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June 04, 1993 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1993-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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by foreign manufactur-
ers.
Yet others fear there
may be local negative
impact of an accelerated
movement of manufac-
turing jobs to Mexico
under a free trade agree-
ment with Mexico,
Canada and the United
States.
Michigan's unemploy-
ment rate is 6.7 percent,
slightly below the
national 7 percent aver-
age. Economist David
Sowerby said indicators
show the economy will
turn around from the
recent recession. But, he
warned, that does not
mean these graduates
will have an easy time
securing work.
The U.S. Department
of Labor estimates that
20 percent of all college
graduates from the
1980s are working in
jobs today that do not
require degrees.
The figure is double
the percentage it was in
the 1960s, when a col-
lege degree virtually
guaranteed a decent job,
said David Hecker, an
economist with the U.S.
Department of Labor.
"What we are seeing
in 1993 is a recession on
top of a long-term sur-
plus of graduates," Mr.
Hecker said. "Clearly the
message is that a college
degree in itself is no
longer a guarantee. But
without it, you can't be
in the competition.
"These days, even now
that the recession is
over, you still have to
really sell yourself to get
a first job," Mr. Hecker
said. "Things will
improve, but the situa-
tion is unlikely to
improve to the point
where there is a job for
every college graduate."
Baby boomers have
grown up, and many are
walking away with
lucrative early retire-
ment packages from big
corporations. But the
jobs - mostly those in
middle management -
are not being filled as
corporate America con-
tinues the massive
downsizing that began
two years ago.
"The issue is not so
much whether or not
they will get jobs," said

Nurenberg,
executive director for
Jewish Vocational
Service in Southfield.
"We are talking about
dreams. They just may
not get their dream jobs
right off the bat.
"There is a lot to be
said for education," Ms.
Nurenberg said. "But if
you go through college
without concentrating on
employability, you may
be in for a rude awaken-
ing.
"If you can combine
your education with
skills that are mar-
ketable, the probability
of securing your dream
job is much greater," she
said.
JVS keeps no statistics
on the numbers of recent
college graduates who
use the service for career
guidance and placement.
But staffers have noticed
some trends.
"We are seeing those
who graduated last year
and still don't have the
jobs they had hoped for,"
said Rosemary Doyle,

Barbara

"We are seeing
those who
graduated last
year and still don't
have the jobs."

JVS supervisor of career
development."Some
graduates are too gener-
al in what they want to
do, and others are too
focused. Competition is
just tough."
Placement counselors
said those entering col-
lege must begin getting
on-the-job experience
while still in school,
opening doors for future
jobs. They should pay
better attention to shifts
in the labor market, and
they must take advan-
tage of networking,
internships and the cor-
porate back-door routes.
"In the past, experi-
ence was nice," Ms.
Nurenberg said. "Now it
is a necessity."
Dawn Oberman, a sta-
tistical services special-
ist with the College
Placement Council in
Bethlehem, Pa., said
choices today for the col-
lege graduate are limit-
ed.

Students have to work
harder to find that first
job, she said. They can
no longer depend upon
the recruiters, who
planned to visit 11 per-
cent fewer schools this
past year.
"We are seeing that
eight months after grad-
uation, large percent-
ages do find employ-
ment," Ms. Oberman
said. "Students will get
jobs. They may not be in
the location they want at
the salary they had
hoped for or at first
directly related to their
majors.
"But this does not
mean they will come out
of college and flip ham-
burgers," Ms. Oberman
said. "By having a
degree, they still will be
one step ahead. This
means their lifelong
potential is greater for
getting into executive
positions."
Jayson Raitt is more
than willing to pay his
dues. Last month, he
graduated from the
University of Michigan
with a bachelor's degree
in communications. This
week, he is moving to
California, where he has
a place to live. All he
needs is a job in film
production.
Despite the market, he
is convinced he will find
something. During col-
lege, he worked for Walt
Disney Pictures on cam-
pus as a film promoter.
"I have a plan," Mr.
Raitt said. "The job mar-
ket is tough, but I am
confident because I've
done a lot of legwork,
and I've tried ever since
getting out of high
school to gain as much
experience as I could in
the film industry.
"I am anxious," he
said. "But I will find
something."
Some of Mr. Raitt's
friends are going to law
school and medical
school in the fall. Some
haven't spent much time
thinking about their
futures.
"I should be worried,"
Mr. Raitt said. "But I
have been working hard
trying to get in touch
with people, and I am
willing to start at the
very bottom." El

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