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November 22, 1991 - Image 62

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ISRAEL

One-of-a-Kinds, Floor Samples
and Discontinued Quality Home
Furnishings.

Fashion And Function Meet In This Sleeper Loveseat
And Matching Chair.

B. Matching Chair Is Also
Available In Teal And
Copen (Blue/Grey).
30" x 30" x 29"H.
Compare At $289,
Our Price 11"1

A. The Nova Sleeper
Loveseat Is Available In
Teal And Copen (Blue/
Grey). 58" x 30" x 29"H.
Compare At $485,
Our Price 179 •

165

WZPS/Doug las Gu thrie

t

A traffic bottleneck at Jaffa Gate.

Traffic Congestion
Jams Jerusalem

The Quality You Have
Come To Expect From
The House Of Denmark
At Closeout Prices, And
A Variety That Will
Keep You Coming Back.
Quantities Limited.

SIMON GRIVER

Special to The Jewish News

Featured Products
Subject To Prior Sale.

Only at Keego Harbor 3325 Orchard Lake Rd.
(1 Mile North of Long Lake Rd.) 682-7600

TWO GREAT STORES
ONE GREAT SUNDAY

SALE

Nov. 24, 12-5 PM

30 % OFF 30•50%
OFF

All 2 Piece

"ON THE GO WEAR" ALL HANDBAGS

1-,b51yri6 Intimate Apparel

APPLEGAT E SQUARE
NORTHWESTE RN & INKSTER

353-5522

111
0

Edo n it

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357.1800

91ovi crile dales

"CERAMIC TILE SPECIALIST"

Direct Importers of Italian Ceramic Tile

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Complete Tile Store From Start To Finish

SAVE 10% ON YOUR PURCHASE

with this ad

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Novi Commerce Center • 40500 Grand River • Novi

Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Open Wed. till 7 p.m., Sat. 9-1 p.m.

62

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1991

D

espite its elevated
status, Jerusalem is
not immune from
mundane problems like traf-
fic congestion. While the flow
of vehicles in Israel's capital
is not as heavy as in London,
New York or even Tel Aviv,
the Holy City is, nevertheless,
confronted with a range of
unique problems as it sets
about building a network of
highways fit for the 21st
century.
In the first place, new high-
ways must not violate the ci-
ty's delicate religious, ethnic
and political sensitivies, as
was the case some ten years
ago with the road to the
northwestern suburb of
Ramot. The Orthodox com-
munity felt that the tho-
roughfare passed too close to
the religious neighborhood of
Sanhedria, and, consequent-
ly, motorists using this route
on the Sabbath were the tar-
gets of stone-throwing Or-
thodox demonstrators.
Another controversy was
the highway to Ma'ale
Adumim, southeast of Jeru-
salem. For several years
Mayor. Teddy Kollek refused
to agree to the construction of
the section of the highway
leading into Jerusalem
because he disagreed with the
Likud's policy of building
outer metropolitan suburbs
like Ma'ale Adumiin, which
are beyond Jerusalem's city
limits. The new section of
Highway Number One bet-
ween French hill and the ci-
ty center was held up by op-
ponents for more than 20
years. Many felt that the
route of the road, which strad-
dles the pre-1967 division of
the city, would be a reminder

of where the wall once stood.
In addition to these sensi-
tivities, Jerusalem's topogra-
phical and geological location
makes road-building an ex-
pensive business. Roads must
wend their way around hill-
sides or be blasted through
the mountainside. Digging
through solid rock to lay
water, sewage and electricity
infrastructures is also
expensive.
Aesthetic considerations
also add to costs, as with the
highway linking Ramot to the
western entrance of the city
and the new road skirting
Beit Hakerem, which have
been neatly terraced into the

Many felt that the
route of the road
would be a
reminder of where
the wall once
stood.

hillside. Rafi Davara, adviser
to Mayor Kollek, once
estimated that meter for
meter new highways in
Jerusalem cost five times that
of Tel Aviv.
"On top of all these special
problems," says Itche Gur,
spokesman for the Jerusalem
Development Authority,
which is responsible for im-
plementing the city's
highway blueprint, "there are
the universal problems: traf-
fic bottlenecks which can
choke the city, especially dur-
ing peak hours, and road ac-
cidents. Residents, of course,
are eager to see new highways
that overcome these problems
but are also reluctant to have
them built near their own
homes. Environmentalists,
too, are lobbying increasing-

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