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November 15, 1991 - Image 103

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-11-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE ❑ GIFT GUIDE

Sittin' Pretty has that really special
Hanukah gift

that is, it starts to
disintegrate in their equip-
ment, many companies will
opt to halt the transferring
process. This is not only to
protect their delicate equip-
ment but also to save what is
probably the sole copy of your
film.
"Films today are not shot
on to a wall and videorecord-
ed but rather they are elec-
tronically transferred via a
digital process," says Shelly
Brodsky, associate producer
at Video Protection in Farm-
ington Hills, a company that
does their transferring on the
premises.
"Whenever you transfer
film to video you lose quality,"
she says. "But by doing it
digitally, you lose the least
amount possible."
Their average charge is
eight cents a foot and they
claim not to have a minimum
charge. They transfer sound
movies as well and if your
movies are silent, they will
lay down a musical sound-
track. This runs about $15
per two hour videotape.
In addition, they will allow
you into their studios to nar-
rate your own movies. The
charge varies but it may be
worth the price to you in the
future to have heard your

grandmother recount a
special family event in her
own voice.
Generally, they clean up
your films, taking out the
black spots, the out of focus
sections or the parts you want
deleted.
"Because we do our own
work, we try to work with our
customers and call them if we
have questions about a par-
ticular scene or sequence,"
says Brodsky.
No matter where you go to
have your movies changed to
sparkling video, you will ap-
preciate the ease in slipping
them into your videorecorder
for viewing and, afterward,
storing them on a bookshelf.

One more suggestion:
videotapes are easy to copy
and you can take advantage
of this in several ways. First,
you can surprise your grown
. children or other relatives
with their own copies of these
momentos. Also, make a copy
for yourself and keep it in
your storage vault at your
bank or some other safe place.
Making an extra copy en-
sures that in the event some-
thing happens to your house
or just the tape, you can still
preserve these precious
memories of your life.



Chanukah Books
For Kids Of All Ages

BARBARA GOLDBERG

Special to The Jewish News

S

pell it Chanukah,
Hanukkah or even
Channukah, the 25th
of Kislev is almost here. The
age-old story of the miracle of
the oil that burned for eight
days and eight nights will be
celebrated in Jewish homes
throughout the world as Jews
everywhere retell the heroic
tale of the Maccabees fight for
religious freedom.
Tired and hungry, Hershel
of Ostropol looks forward to
coming to the next village on
this first night of Chanukah.
Expecting to find bright
candles, merry songs and
platters of latkes, he finds in-
stead silence and darkness.
The villagers are afraid to
celebrate Chanukah because
of the goblins that haunt the
old synagogue on the hill and
prevent the Chanukah
menorah from being lit. Her-
shel decides to help the
villagers by outwitting the
goblins. "If I can't outwit a
few goblins, then my name
isn't Hershel of Ostropol."
This original Chanukah tale
Hershel and the Goblins by
Eric Kimmel (Holiday

House), beautifully illustra-
ted by Trina Schart Hyman,
is sure to please the 3-8-year-
old set. Other Chanukah
boOks for preschoolers
include:
Just Enough is Plenty: A
Hanukkah Tale by Barbara
Diamond Goldin (Viking Kes-
trel). Recommended for ages
3-8, this Chanukah tale is a
wonderful read-aloud for the
whole family to share. In
classic Yiddish folklore tradi-
tion, the value of helping
those in need is stressed —
"always having something for
the stranger who knocks on
our door." Set in a Polish
village, a needy family with
barely enough for their own
Chanukah, welcome a poor
peddler into their home. The
next morning the peddler is
gone, but he has left gifts for
the family. Could the peddler
really have been Elijah the
Prophet?
Beni's First Chanukah by
Jane Zalben (Holt). The
warmth and joy of Chanukah
are celebrated by a young
bear and his sister. For ages
4-6.
Rainbow Candles: A
Chanukah Counting Book
(Kar Ben), a boardbook with
rounded edges by Myra

• Ceramic art • Sculptures • Clocks • Contemporary wall decor
• Glass art • Crystal • Floral arrangements

Always 20% off
Sittin' Pretty

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Hours: M-Sat. 9-6, Thurs. 9-7, Sun. 12-4

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— Buses Saturday and Sunday
— Classes for all skill levels

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"Teaching KIDS to Ski is our Business"
Call Harvey Rubenstein
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Gift Certificates

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Call 349 5163 For Details

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SAVE THIS SECTION ..

Your reference to the area's best gift ideas for the holidays.

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