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February 08, 1991 - Image 58

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1991-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NEWS

BLOOMFIELD
DODGE
INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE

NEW 1991

CARAVAN
S
11,995

Fro

48 Mo. Lease Only

$199

per
month

Automatic Transmission, Air Cond., 2.5 Litre Engine,
Rear Washer/Wiper, Rear Defroster, AM/FM Stereo,
Tinted Glass, Dual Horns, Light Package, 5 Pass.,
Deluxe Sound Insulation.

OPEN MONDAY & THURSDAY
9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.

• Plus tax, Ho., destination. Rebates assigned to dealer where applicable. Optional equipment extra. Prior sales excluded.
• • Up from 10% of MSRP down, first payment and refundable security deposit (rounded to nearest S25 increment over payment). Total
payments: Payment times 48. Payment includes consumer rebate, tax, title and insurance extra. Option to buy at lease end at a pre-set
price, S.08 per mile penalty over 60,000 miles. Pay for damage. Subject to approved credit.

bloomfidd

PONTIAC

► d

Dodge

338-9033

DETROIT

258-9113

ON TELEGRAPH, N. OF SQUARE LAKE RD.
IN FRONT OF BLOOMFIELD SQ.

Las Vegas Night

20% OFF

Sponsored by

ALWAYS

Congregation Beth Achim Men's Club

Excluding LeSport sac

21100 W 12 Mile Rd. • Southfield, Michgian

29815 Northwestern Hwy.
In Applegate Square

Donation -- $5.00

Tickets available at the door • (must be 21 or over)

'''f ■

For further information call

352-8670

Proceeds for General Fund — License #M20051

•tO

of Southfield

• PASSPORT •
SPECIAL

$7.95

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Open Thursday
til 8 p.m.

Contemporary
Women's Fashions

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855.4464

HUNTERS UARE • FARMINGTON HILIS

HOURS:
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Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5

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357-1800

Cruisewear
Is Here!

Black Jack — Over & Under — Craps — Roulette
Cash Prizes • 50/50 Raffles • Refreshments Available.

$500.00 per person limit on winnings.

Q1'0

FREE

Municipal
Bonds Listing

Receive Weekly Report

4.G &Iwo& & Sota Inc

I3EST1EN78 !WE 1887

$14.95

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2 sets

(313) 336-9200 1-800-365-9200

'Must Be Done Al The Same Time"

2

Photos per passport (wiih coupon)

10% off on posters

(GrecntotAnnivensories&OcrWivahs)

$18.95 $23.95 $27.95

20%-50% off on Frames

FULL PHOTO SERVICES INCLUDING: BLACK & WHITE, ENLARGEMENTS, POSTERS I

29175 Northwestern Hwy. at 12 Mile Rd. in Franklin Shopping Plaza

58

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1991

cl,

AMERICAN
CANCER
SOCIETY3

Help us keep winning.

Israelis Eye Cost-Cutting
With Atlanta Physician

ELLEN BERNSTEIN

Special to The Jewish News

I

n just two weeks, an
Atlanta ophthalmologist,
voluntarily consulting in
Israel, wiped clean a three
month-backlog of immi-
grants needing critical eye
surgery.
At the same time, the
physician set a cost-saving
precedent for Israel's so-
cialized medical system by
treating immigrants with
same day surgery.
The 87 ambulatory
surgeries, performed by Dr.
Stephen Kutner and Israeli
ophthalmologist Claudette
Keroub, proved to the
government that immigrant
patients with a language
barrier could be operated on
with local anesthesia and
without hospital stays — at
a savings of up to 75 percent.
Until that time, immi-
grants, particularly the
poorly educated Ethiopians,
presented too many com-
munication and accultura-
tion problems to consider
same day surgery, said Dr.
Kutner, who has returned to
his downtown Atlanta prac-
tice.
He added that ambulatory
surgery is new to the Kupat
Cholim, the government-
sponsored medical care
system that services up to 90
percent of Israel's popula-
tion.
Dr. Kutner, who is presi-
dent of the Atlanta Bureau
of Jewish Education, last fall
served for the second time in
1990 as a consultant for
Kupat Cholim.
Dr. Kutner said he was
picked for the assignment
not only for his expertise in
same day eye surgery, but
because of his association
with Ethiopian Jewry. He
was the first Jewish oph-
thalmologist to go into Ethi-
opia on a medical mission to
treat Ethiopian Jews. Since
the 1987 trip, Dr. Kutner
remained active in Ethio-
pian-Jewish affairs.
"The Ethiopian Jews rep-
resent a unique culture of
proven biblical Judaism,"
said Dr. Kutner. "Their
plight and their survival
really touched me. I felt it
urgent that I dedicate my
work to them."
During his first trip to
Israel for Kupat Cholim in
May, Dr. Kutner vol-
unteered for three weeks,

Ellen Bernstein writes for the
Atlanta Jewish Times.

assessing the eye care needs
of about 500 of the many E-
thiopians overwhelming ab-
sorption centers in Northern
Israel. He also saw about
100 Russian immigrants at
the Lin Clinic in Haifa.
In seven 12-hour days, Dr.
Kutner saw immigrants,
mostly over 40 years old,
whose eye problems included
trachoma, cataracts,
glaucoma, infections, blind-
ness from corneal scars and
lid deformities.
What Dr. Kutner found
was that the Israelis were
taking "good care" of the E-
thiopians and Soviet olim.
Among Ethiopian children,
Israeli eye specialists had
completely reversed eye
problems caused by
malnutrition in civil-war
ravaged Ethiopia, Dr.
Kutner said.
But what he also saw was
"that the Israelis are being
overwhelmed by o/im.

Dr. Kutner plans to
form an American
task force who can
advise the Kupat
Cholim on
implementing
cost-saving, same
day surgery in
Israel.

Israeli doctors are working
as hard as they can."
However, due to com-
munication problems and a
dearth of social workers and
translators, "the health care
delivery system broke
down," Dr. Kutner said.
The ophthalmologist add-
ed that Soviets, who lost
their entitlement to health
care when they applied for
exit visas, came to Israel
with a host of untreated and
poorly treated medical prob-
lems.
The three- to six-month
waiting lists for critical
ocular care was so swollen
with the rise in o/im that pa-
tients with advanced
diabetes were in danger of
going blind waiting for
surgery, Dr. Kutner said. He
added that long waiting lists
for specialized procedures is
a problem common to most
countries with socialized
medical systems.
In May, Dr. Kutner asked
the Kupat Cholim to provide
him in September with a
free-standing facility and a
small ophthalmic surgical
team "to do intense surgery
for the waiting list."

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