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January 05, 1990 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1990-01-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INSIDE WASHINGTON

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Loan Is First Rate.

CURRENT APR MAX. LOAN
TO VALUE

Franklin Savings

12.25%

80%

National Bank of Detroit

12.50%

75%

Manufacturers

12.50%

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Standard Federal

12.50%

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Comerica

12.50%

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Michigan National Bank

12.50%

75%

LOWEST RATE & HIGHEST LOAN LIMIT

The chart says it all. Even the largest financial institutions
in Metro Detroit don't offer the LOWEST RATE and the
HIGHEST LOAN LIMIT like Franklin Savings Bank.

PLUS ... There are NO ANNUAL FEES or closing costs
that can cost 100's of dollars at other banks.

*Applications now being accepted for our variable rate home
equity plan adjusted monthly according to prime + 1.75%
to a maximum Annual Percentage Rate of 18.0% effective
11-26-89.

+ Other offers may apply based on first mortgage relationship.

CALL (313) 358-5170

Franklin
Bank

SAVINGS

SOUTHFIELD GROSSE POINTE WOODS BIRMINGHAM

FDIC - Insured

hillside

(F.)

furniture
clearance center

contemporary for less

LOTS OF LEATHER STYLES & COLORS TO
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DINING RMS., DINETTES, BEDROOMS,
LAMPS, PAINTINGS AND MUCH MORE!

HOURS: MON, THURS, FRI 10-9 & TUES, WED, SAT 10-6

ORCHARD MALL Maple at Orchard Lk. Rd. 855-4065

28

FRIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1990

Democratic Party Chief Brown
Heading Delegation To Israel

JAMES D. BESSER

Washington Correspondent

perience there convinced me
personally that we must
make it ever clear that

T

he American Israel
Public Affairs Corn-
mittee (AIPAC), a
group that knows the value
of trips to Israel for key
policy-makers, has landed a
big fish in this quiet winter
season.
Scheduled for a trip in the
next few weeks is a group of
Democratic consultants and
Ron Brown, chairman of the
Democratic National Com-
mittee.
It will not be the first trip
for Brown, whose election to
the top party post made
some Jewish activists
uneasy because of his
association with former
presidential contender Jesse
Jackson.
In a speech to the Con-
ference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations in June,
Brown referred to his
previous visits to Israel as
pivotal experiences. "My ex-

Rep. Wolpe:
Urges South African break.

Israel does not stand alone
in the community of
nations."
Also on the travel circuit
in these last days of the
winter recess is Rep. Howard

Wolpe, D-Mich., due in
South Africa where he will
discuss the sensitive ques-
tion of Israeli-South African
military ties. Wolpe has
been a leader in Congress in
attempting to mobilize the
Jewish community here to
urge the Israelis to make a
clear break with the
Pretoria government.
Wolpe is scheduled to meet
with anti-apartheid activist
Rev. Allan A. Boesak, who
recently accepted an invita-
tion to address the March
convention of the American-
Arab Anti-Discrimination
Committee (ADC).
Wolpe's trip also comes in
the wake of recent comments
by South African Ar-
chbishop Desmond Tutu,
who urged the Jewish people
to "forgive" the Nazis for the
Holocaust. Tutu's com-
ments, which came during a
recent pilgrimage to Israel,
has troubled the community
of anti-apartheid activists
here — many of whom are
Jewish.

D.C. Rep In 1990
Is O.U. Goal

The Orthodox presence in
the rough-and-tumble of na-
tional affairs continues to
grow by leaps and bounds.
Last week, one of the new
players in this high-stakes
game was in town for a
round of meetings that may
have an impact on a number
of important issues in corn-
ing months.
William Rapfogel, exec-
utive director of the Or-
thodox Union's Institute for
Public Affairs, portrayed his
group as representing a
middle road in Orthodox ac-
tivism.
"I think there is a great
silent majority of Orthodox
Jews who are not necessarily
`right wing,' " he said.
"These are thoughtful
people who want to think
these issues out, work them
out in a way that is good for
everybody."
The institute, he sug-
gested, is moving toward a
"think tank" approach to po-
litical activism. "What we
want to provide is careful
analysis of the issues, not
just simple reactions to
events. Too often, we've been
simply reactive."
Rapfogel confirmed the
long-rumored intention of
the OU to open a

Washington office, but
declined to provide a date.
"Opening a Washington of-
fice is a goal. Perhaps in a
year or a year and a half.
We'd like to see a part-time
representative in
Washington sometime in
1990."
An OU presence in
Washington would provide a
distinctly different Orthodox
perspective than the one
offered by Agudath Israel of
America, the vocal Orthodox
group whose Washington of-
fice has played a role in
issues like the recent debate
over child care legislation.

"It's important for people
to understand that the Or-
thodox community is as non-
monolithic as any other part.
of the Jewish community,"
Rapfogel said. "It's a very
broad based community;
that's part of the difficulty in
putting together an
organization like this one."

Rapfogel also argued for
more Orthodox involvement
in pro-Israel activism. "For
too long, there has not been
an Orthodox presence in
these issues," he said. "This
is something we need to
change."

Lewis Leaves D.C.
For AJCongress Post

Washington soon will lose
one of its most prominent
Jewish activists when Ann
Lewis, a top political consul-
tant, departs for Boston.
Lewis, who advised Jesse
Jackson during his 1988
campaign and worked to
bridge the gap between
Jackson and the Jewish
community, recently took
over as chair of the
American Jewish Congress

Commission on Womens
Equality.
As usual, Lewis has big
plans to raise the group's
level of activism.
One of Lewis' goals in 1990
will be to reach out to Jewish
women in Eastern Europe.
"We want to be sure that the
planning for Soviet im-
migrants coming to Israel
will include explicit prepa-
rations for women. When

1

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