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October 20, 1989 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

COOKING

Mon.-Sot. 9-9
Sun. 12-5

WE HONOR ALL OTHER COMPETITOR COUPONS!!

Jumbo

U.S. #1

PISTACHIOS

CASHEWS

Reg. $4.99

Reg. $5.99

Red or Natural

NOW

$3.49 NOW $3.49

Extra Fancy Mixed Nuts
No Peanuts

Reg. $4,99

NOW

$3.49

59*,,

RICE BRAN $1.29 lb.
CORN BRAN $1.29 lb.

MOTOR CITY
MUFFINS

1.00 OFF

Hearty One-Dish Meals
For Sukkot Dining

Sparkling Water Process

with coupon
Expires 11-3-89

ETHEL G. HOFMAN

ir

Special to The Jewish News

OAT BRAN

We Carry

$

o li_lsUDI
e f O o r F FLE t C
.10N
ee0sUt o R r C

with coupon
Expires 11-3-89

with coupon
Expires 11-3-89

with coupon
Expires 11-3-89

CADILLAC
COFFEE

MIXED NUTS

EE
DUY I GET I FRI

•Coffee • Peanut Butter
*Chocolat Parfait • Coffee Mocha

Save

$

with coupon - Expires 11-3-89

FLOUR
10 4 lb. Limit .

JOLLY RANCHERS 99' lb.

Reg. $3.59 lb.

s 2.99 lb.

or

12 oz. White Tortilla Chips
or
12 oz. Corn Tortilla Chips

Keopplingers Bread Outlet
at Reduced Prices

SUGARFREE
PARTY COOKIES

NOW

WYANDOT
12 oz. Cheese Balls

with $5.00 purchose

SUGAR
19 4 lb. Limit

We now Carry
Greenfield Noodles in Bulk

with $5.00 purchose

Come in and see our fine selection of Halloween Candy!

Orchard 12 Plaza
27885 Orchard Lake Rd. at 12 Mile Rd.

553-2165

A new choice for the frail elderly

Independent Living with
Supportive Services

A new caring alternative for
the frail elderly is now
available at the exciting new
and elegant West Bloomfield
Nursing and Convalescent
Center.

• Deluxe semi-private or private
mini suites all with private
baths and a beautiful view of
a courtyard or wooded
grounds.

• Town Center Plaza with a
It's called Independent Living
snack shop, beauty salon,
with Supportive Services. It's
flower and gift shop and an
the choice between
old-fashioned ice cream parlor.
independent living and skilled
nursing care for the elderly
• Fine dining in an elegant
person who needs the
dining area with meals
essentials of living such as
prepared by an executive chef
housekeeping service, meals,
and served by a courteous,
laundry service and
friendly staff
medication, if needed.
Licensed nurses are on duty 24
hours a day.
• Exciting and varied activities,
planned and supervised, to
Residents in this program can
keep residents involved and
enjoy a relaxed, elegant
happy
atmosphere that includes:

Honor us with o visit. Weekdays 9 o.m-8 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday, noon-5 p.m.

An Affiliate of William Beaumont Hospital

• Pastoral and weekly Sabbath
services provided by Rabbi
Moshe Polter

.111
11A"Sta9 6445 West Maple • West Bloomfield, MI

Phone: 661-1600

OefieP-

To/From: Metropolitan From/To: Any Address
in Southfield
Airport
Lathrup Village
Two Hours Notice or Less
Bingham Farms
For $15.00 /person
Mon .-Fri. • 6 a.m.-6 p. m . (lesaur,y
* * SPECIAL WITH THIS AD *. *

For

Mon. pick-up

Ride from metro to any north area address $12.00

Comfort • Safety • Reliability

64

Exp.
12/31/89

CAGITST 7 7 ° -$ 41 ;6E2 J N

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1989

I

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0

he day was warm and
sunny, a beautiful be-
ginning to the High
Holidays. So it was that after
Rosh Hashanah services, my
spouse and I strolled around
the wooded synagogue
grounds and came upon the
four posts. These posts, the
base for the community suk-
kah, made me think ahead to
Sukkot, the joyful holiday
which follows, the somber,
thought-provoking Days of
Awe.
Sukkot is called zeman
simhateinu, the season of re-
joicing. The most important
ritual is eating in a sukkah
(some people also sleep in it),
a temporary structure made
of four walls and a roof. Its
flimsiness is to remind us
of the huts in the desert
where the Israelites
wandered for 40 years.
The building of a sukkah is
a family affair and takes
place right after Yom Kippur
so that it is ready to be used
for the first time on Sukkot
Eve. Adults and children
gather cornstalks, gourds,
cranberries — and anything
else they can lay their hands
on — to build and decorate.
Although carpets and rugs
may be used for the walls, the
roof must be made of
something that has grown
and been taken from the
ground; evergreen branches
and cornstalks are popular
since there must be enough
covering to ensure more
shade than sun but not so
much as to prevent the stars
being seen. (There's always a
willing farmer who allows a
carload of cornstalks to be
taken from his field.)
One of my favorite customs
is taken from Sephardic
friends. Their most ornate
chair (or an ordinary one
covered with a tapestry) is set
aside in the sukkah for the
ushpizin, symbolic guests.
These "guests" are Abraham,
Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses,
Aaron and David — all were
wanderers or exiles. One is
invited each day to eat in the
sukkah, the custom relating
to giving shelter and food to
the poor. This is a perfect
opportunity to also invite
those who who have no family
at home or don't have a suk-
kah of their own.
Sukkot also marks the
harvest, the final gathering of
fresh produce before winter
sets in, and this inspires
special dishes for the holiday.

Whatever is in abundance
can be transformed into quick
and tasty dishes. I prefer one-
dish meals so that there's less
to carry from the kitchen to
outdoors. And because these
dishes are planned around
vegetables, they're a good
start to the dietary guidelines
for healthy Americans.
The recipes which follow
are all one-dish meals to be
eaten in the sukkah. All you
need to add are some rolls,
fruit for dessert and a
beverage of your choice.

This may be made up to two
days ahead and refrigerated.

SUKKOT POT AU FEU

2 tablespoons vegetable
oil
2 large onions, peeled
and sliced
1 medium eggplant,
peeled and cut in 11/2
inch dice
2 large tomatoes, cut
coarsely
1 apple, unpeeled, cored
and cut into 12
wedges
1 /2 cup tomato sauce
% cup fresh basil or
parsley, coarsely
chopped
11/2 teaspoons cumin
1 /4 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon sugar or
honey
1 pound ground turkey

In a large, heavy skillet,
heat oil. Add onions and cook
for 2 minutes over low heat.
Do not brown. Add eggplant,
tomatoes, apple, tomato
sauce, basil, cumin, pepper
and sugar. Cover and cook
over low heat for 5 minutes.
With wet hands, roll ground
turkey into small balls about
11/2 inches in diameter. Ar-
range on top of vegetable mix-
ture in skillet, cover and cook
over medium heat for 10
minutes. Stir gently and con-
tinue cooking covered for 20
minutes longer or until
turkey balls are cooked.
Serves 4 to 6.

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