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September 09, 1989 - Image 112

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1989-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Classically styled natural
golden Russian sable coat.

112

STYLE

she continues. "It's usually shown in
short evening jackets and boleros, and
in long coats for evening."
The traditionally styled coat is
generally loose-fitting and easy-to-wear.
But the details vary. The coat may have
notched lapels, a tuxedo front or a side
closing; a shawl collar or a mandarin
collar; patch or slit pockets. "We are
seeing minks worked diagonally and
horizontally and, sometimes, both pat-
terns are mixed in the same coat," says
Lili Glassman. "We're also seeing more
natural and less exaggerated shoulders."
Coats are getting shorter, too. The
52-inch ankle-length is still standard, but
now on the market are a 48-inch mid-
calf length and, even newer, a 41-inch
length.
"Designers are showing the mid-calf
length more and more because not all
women can wear the really long ankle-
length," Blye says. " They want women
to have other options. The 41-inch long
coat falls about one to two inches
below the knee. It has already been
shown in Canada and Europe, but was
new this year in the United States
shows. It will take awhile for consumers
here to get used to it."
A top quality, full-length mink coat
runs about $8,000 to $12,000 retail, and
the price depends on factors such as
male versus female skins, number of
pelts used, where the coat is produc-
ed, and when the skins were bought at
auction. The fur industry is aware of the
changes in merchandising and the
numerous outlets for purchasing furs
besides a furrier's, but Blye has a war-
ning for consumers: "You don't get
gold for the price of silver." To assure
you are getting what you pay for, "you
have to go with the reputation of the
furrier."
So popular is mink — for its versatili-
ty, durability and color range — that,
says Blye, "you have mink, and then
you have the others." Among the other
furs, raccoon turned up in all the col-
lections. "It's very popular with first-
time (fur) buyers. It's a 'wear
everywhere' fur, and well priced."
Long-haired beaver, another versatile,
affordable fur, is also popular with first-
time buyers. Sheared beaver accepts
dye well, so it was shown in fashion col-
ors like red and loden green as well as
natural shadings.
"Raccoon and beaver were shown in
classic styles — duffle coats with
hoods, traditional coats. Consumers
who want those furs want classic styl-

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