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October 24, 1986 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1986-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Friday, October 24, 1986

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

CAPITOL REPORT

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DOORS"

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WOLF BLITZER

Summit Flop Bodes III
For Soviet-Israeli Accord

W

ashington — The
failure to produce a
sweeping U.S:Soviet
arms control agreement at
the Reykjavik summit has
certainly resulted in a more
chilly relationship between
the two superpowers.
As a result, there is scant
hope in Washington for any
immediate improvement in
the plight of Soviet Jewry. It
is also unlikely that the
Soviet attitude toward Israel
and the Arab-Israeli peace
process will significantly
mellow.
Authoritative U.S. officials
maintain that Soviet Jewish
emigration is still being held
hostage to the state of
American-Soviet relations.
When ties between Wash-
ington and Moscow are on the
upswing — as they were in
the mid-1970s during the
golden days of detente —
emigration visas are granted
in relatively large numbers.
But when the relationship
sours, as has been the case in
recent years, the exit permits
dwindle to a trickle.
At Reykjavik, there had
been an opportunity for a
dramatic turn-around on
arms control. By all accounts,
the two sides were on the
verge of signing an historic
agreement. That would have
automatically improved East-
West ties.
But the talks collapsed
without any agreements. As
a result, there is little pros-
pect right now for a visit to
the United States by Gor-
bachev — something an-
ticipated for later this year or
early next in advance of the
meetings in Iceland. At their
Geneva summit in 1985, the
two men had agreed to hold
back-to-back annual sum-
mits, first in the U.S. and then
the Soviet Union. In the
weeks leading up to such a
visit, the Soviets were ex-
pected to ease up on the Jews.
But now, all of that is up in
the air.
The Soviet Union's release
of David Goldfarb and two
other Soviet Jewish "re-
fuseniks" in recent days was
not part of any formal U.S:
Soviet agreement, Secretary
of State George Shultz said.
Other U.S. officials express-
ed doubt that the release of
what they called some "to-
ken" people signalled a
significant easing of the
overall plight of Soviet Jewry.
The Secretary, interviewed
on NBC's "Meet the Press,"
said that Gorbachev was cer-
tainly aware of the likelihood
of huge anti-Soviet demon-
strations being planned to
coincide with any visit by the
Soviet leader to the United
States.
"He certainly is aware [of it]
because he has certainly been

told directly," he said. "Of
course, we will welcome him
here to the United States and
he'll be treated with the
respect and dignity that he
deserves, but there won't be
the kind of warmth out there
in the American public that
we'd like to see because of the
human rights problem."
In an article published in
The New York Times, Shultz
said that the human rights
issue was "front and center"
at the Iceland summit. "Per-

There is little
prospect now for a
visit to the U.S.
by Gorbachev,
something that
had been expected
before the summit.

haps never before has the
Government and interested
groups and inidividuals in
this country cooperated so
extensively in preparing for
such a meeting," he said.
"In Reykjavik, the Presi-
dent drew heavily on mater-
ials provided by the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
and other organizations. It
made for a strong and con-
vincing presentation. We
believe the Soviets will con-
sider it carefully. We hope it
will have an impact in the
months ahead."
There is now a massive
public relations campaign
underway by Washington and
Moscow. Both sides are try-
ing to explain their versions
of the truth. President
Reagan, Secretary of State
George Shultz, and other Ad-
ministration officials are
making themselves available
for all sorts of unusual on-the-
record briefings. Their mes-
sage is the same: the Soviets
were to blame for the failure.
In Moscow, of course, the op-
posite case is being made.
Gorbachev personally is
leading the charge there.
The President and his ad-
visers, after some initial ex-
pressions of deep disappoint-
ment, are now trying to sug-
gest that all is by no means
lost. The arms control spec-
ialists can continue the pro-
cess in Geneva. The U.S. is
ready to take up in Geneva
where the talks in Reyjavik
left off.
Reagan's top aides have
continued to press that line.
But so far, their efforts have
met with only mixed results.
The Soviet Union is con-
sidering a new U.S. proposal
aimed at creating a "formal"
framework for dealing on a
"regular" basis with human
rights and humanitarian
issues, including Soviet

c

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