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December 13, 1985 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1985-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

38 Friday, December 13, 1985 THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

T

a nd

ANALYSIS

DESIGNER SHOES

FORMERLY JAMIE MARX SHOES

r

3 DAY SALE!

1

FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY ONLY

$3 9 00 & $4 9 00

s • • • • • • 41 . I

Ny 0

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C and T DESIGNER SHOES 1

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Sunset Strip

values
t o $300

e
g 1

$5

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WE HAVE PURCHASED THE ENTIRE INVENTORY OF JAMIE MARX
AND ADDED MORE FAMOUS NAMES FOR THIS SALE.

• Evan Picone
• Sergio Rossi
• La Marcia

• Andrew Geller
• Mignani
• DeLiso

• Charles Jourdan

EXTRA SPECIAL ...
FINE GROUP OF MIA FLATS & OTHER CASUALS

C and

19 99

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reg. to $110.00
FINAL CLEARANCE

29504 Northwestern

in the Sunset Strip

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DESIGNER SHOES

BE A WINNER, PLAY

• Natalie Ferrario
• Anne Klein
• Clio Bottier

• J.B. Martin
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THE CLASSIFIEDS

Call The Jewish News
Today

354-6060

HA-KOL: THE JEWISH VOICE

presents

ONE PEOPLE, MANY VOICES:
JEWISH ETHNIC MUSIC IN AMERICA

a production of the

NATIONAL
FOUNDATION
FOR JEWISH
CULTURE

on

FM 102

Sundays, Dec 15, 22, 29, 1985
January 5, 1986

4:30-5:00 p.m.

Downtown and Uptown

Port II of a series celebrating NJFC's 25th
anniversary features the music of Al Jol-
son, Irving Berlin, Benny Goodman,
Sophie Tucker, Eddie Cantor, Gus Kahn,
George Gershwin, Cantors Yossele

Rosenblatt and Jan Peerce, jazz musi-
cians Mezz Mezzropw and Ziggy
Ellman, The Weavers, Connie Francis,
and the Borsch Belt parodies of Allan
Sherman.

Narrated by actor/folksinger Theodore Bikel

Series supported in part by grunts from the National Endowment for the Arts, Consolidated
Edison of New York, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting through the NPR Satellite
Program Development Fund and the Arts and Performance Fund.

Sponsored by

Jewish Community Council

in cooperation with

tee

Pollard Price-Tag

Continued from Page 1

media.
Israeli offiCials have been
anxious to try to remove the
matter from such high public
visilibity.
Inouye, a strong supporter of
Israel and the ranking minority
member of the Senate Appro-
priations Subcommittee on
Foreign Operations, did not di-
rectly refer to the Pollard case
in explaining his decision to •
drop the initiative at this time.
Instead, he cited strict
budgetary problems in Congress
and fresh assurances from Sec-
retary of State George Shultz
that the Administration would
itself study other means to ease
Israel's foreign debt repayment
problems.
The Administration had op-
posed the Inouye amendment as
"budget busting." It had noted
that Israel was already slated to
receive $3 billion in economic
and military grants in the 1986
fiscal year foreign aid bill. Be-
yond that assistance, Congress
passed earlier this year a
supplementary, two-year $1.5
billion economic package for Is-
rael.
The Wall Street Journal said
Israel's supporters in Congress
had looked for "a graceful way
to pull back" from the Inouye
proposal.
Israeli officials, who had
warmly welcomed the Inouye
plan as representing a major
long-term bonanza for Israel's
ailing economy, privately ac-
knowledged that the decision to
withdraw the amendment was
the first "tangible" damage
caused by the Pollard case. They
expressed hope that Inouye
would revive his initiative next
year.
had the Inouye amendment
passed this year, Congressional
observers said, there almost cer-
tainly would have been even
more significant economic sav-
ings for Israel in the long run.
The initial saving for Israel next
year — as envisaged in the ill-
fated Inouye proposal — was to
be followed in subsequent years
by additional amendments
aimed at reducing the interest
rates on other outstanding
loans.
All of that is now going to
have to wait until the dust set-
tles from the Pollard business,"
a pro-Israeli Congressional
source said.
The State Department,
meanwhile, has defended the
decision to name its legal ad-
viser, Judge Abraham Sofaer, as
the head of the U.S. delegation
sent to Israel this week to inves-
tigate the Pollard scandal.
Spokesman Charles Redman,
asked Monday at the daily news
briefing whether Sofaer was a
Jew or Zionist, replied: "It's not
my role to comment on those
kinds of questions."
But when pressed about
Sofaer's background, Redman
said: "The State Department
feels that officials with the State
Department will conduct their
business in a thoroughly profes-
sional manner, and there's abso-
lutely no question whatsoever
that Judge Sofaer and other

people participating in this
delegation will not do so on a
pat basis."
Sofaer, a former New York
state judge, presided over the
Ariel Sharon versus Time mag-
azine libel trial before joining
the State Department last
summer. He was widely praised
for his handling of that case. He
is Jewish and a frequent visitor
to Israel.
Joining him in the delegation
were other senior officials of the
State Department, Justice De-
partment, the FBI and the U.S.
Attorney's Office for the District
of Columbia.
The State Department again
said Monday that it expected Is-

Israel is anxious to
maintain the
tradition of
diplomatic
immunity for its
officials while at the
same time offering
some degree of
cooperation.

rael to fully cooperate with the
delegation. "We intend to pur-
sue fully this case," Redman
said, adding that the U.S. has
been assured of the full cooper-
ation of the Israeli authorities."
That, he added, "continues to be
the ground rules under which
we operate."
Redman also confirmed that
Minister Without Portfolio
Moshe Arens, a former ambas-
sador to the U.S., met last
Thursday evening in Washing-
ton confidentially with Secre-
tary of State George Shultz. "It
concerned the Pollard case," Re-
dman said. But he declined to
elaborate. "I can't characterize
any further that meeting on
Thursday night."
Shultz met with Arens two
weeks earlier, on the night Pol-
lard was arrested outside the Is-
raeli Embassy in Washington.
That session had been prev-
iously scheduled, long before the
U.S. civilian naval intelligence
analyst was picked up on es-
pionage charges. During that
first meeting, the two men dis-
cussed the case in some detail
although other issues were also
reviewed.
This second session was exclu-
sively devoted to the logistics of
the U.S. visit to Israel and other
aspects of the affair.
Shultz and Arens established
a close, personal friendship dur-
ing Arens' tenure as ambassador
in Washington. Both are known
to have extremely high regard
for each other.
Shultz, in announcing the
visit at a news conference last
Friday, said "We have every
reason to believe that the issues
involved will be resolved satis-
factorily."
The Secretary, responding to a

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