100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

March 30, 1984 - Image 28

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1984-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

28

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Friday, March 30, 1984

ENTERTAINMENT TAILORED TO YOUR NEEDS
PROFESSIONAL SOUND,
ULM
LIGHTS, Dl S, M.C.'S

D.0 „E.,
WHERE EVERYTHI N G IS

DISCOUNTED. EVERYDAY

DISCOUNT OFFICE
EQUIPMENT

FOG

4icsif AND MUCH MORE

1991 COOLIDGE, BERKLEY
548-6900

• Sweet 16's
• Bar Mitzvas • Weddings
• Bat Mitzvas • Birthdays
• Reunions
• Organizational and High School Dances
• Parties For All Occasions

Telephones Are
Our Only Business!

See 2 line phones
demonstrated
Open House
Sun., Mar. 25, 1-4

CALL ABOUT OUR REASONABLE RATES

Don Eizen, Jerry Eizen, Adam Gottlieb

Phone 24 Hours
Any Hour — Any Day

r

iu

352-8288

851-6138

Na m on IN IN I.

No IN

am

RINE

so IN

SPECIAL
ENROLL NOW SAVE $$$$
I North-West Beauty College

I

28386 Franklin Road

Southfield. Michigan 48034

22128 Coolidge, Oak Park, MI 48237

548-9383

A Complete Cosmetology Course

Learn

I

• Hair cutting
• Make-up
• Permanent Waves

• Hair Styling
• Manicuring
• Hair Coloring

I

ESIGN-1T

Custom Laminated Furniture.

Bring in this coupon for
a free haircut or manicure
North-West Beauty College

Residential & Commercial

I

Graphic Wall Design

KEITH SCHARE

Designer

Hours: Tues.-Sat. 9:00-4:30

EN=

471-3223 -

INIIM111111111111111111•11111•1111•1111.11111a

y t

This Passover; experience a
delightful change bf taste:
Dry Chablis and DryBurgundy,
new from Manischewitz.
Made for wine drinkers
who prefer the popular
taste.of dry wines, both are
Kosher for Passover and,
of course, the year round.
Celebrate PassoVer
with the wines that will
become as welcome a tra-
dition as Manischewitz
DRYCHABLIS
traditionalyVineS: new
Manischewitz Dry Chablis
and Dry Burgundy.
Ask your vine merchant
to be sure to order them
in time for PassoVer.

MANISCHEWITZ

MANISCHENT?

r""r4757-7—
%,:f4A4111.

le

stmq dry^

47,



••••

. ■ ;:



AMERICAN

[RYBURGOIA

A reIreShingly dry red :able '••••''

.

, '1h

Ac .,

ti

.VAISCHI

anischeultt

© 1984 Monarch Wine Co., Brooklyn, NY 11232

"

Soviet delegation visiting in Israel
denies 'Jewish' question in • USSR

Tel Aviv (JTA) — A
four-man official Soviet
delegation which visited Is-
rael last week as guests of a
public committee of repre-
sentatives of Israeli police
movements said before re-
turning to Moscow that
"there is no such thing as a
Jewii question in the
Soviet Union."
They also said that pro-
gress in solving the Israel-
Arab conflict depended on
Israeli concessions, and that
Soviet policy in the Cher-
nenko era would remain
exactly as it had been in the
past.
Delegation head Yuri
Barabash, chief editor of the
Sovetskaya Kultura Soviet
Culture) newspaper • and
president of the Soviet
Committee for Solidarity
and Friendship With the
Palestine People, said the
delegation had tried to give
Israelis the "true picture"
about Soviet Jewry.
He said the incorrect view
of the position of Soviet
Jewry was due to people
who do not have "accurate
information" on the subject
or have an anti-Soviet bias.
In Washington, Con-
gressman John Porter (R-
Ill.) distributed to each
member of Congress a "ter-
rifying account" of
present-day anti-Semitism
in the Soviet- Union that has
been smuggled out of that
country.
titled
piece,
The
"Documentary Evidence of
Anti-Semitism in the Soviet
Union Today," was written
by Candidate of Sciences
Ivan Frederovick Mar-
tynov, a Russian Christian
Orthodox citizen. Martynov
renounced his post-doctoral
degree with the demand
that this letter be published
in the Soviet Union.
Porter said he issued the
document along with Cong.
Tom. Lantos (D-Calif.) so
that members of Congress
could use the information in
their work on behalf of
Soviet Jews. Porter is foun-
der of the Congressional
Human Rights Caucus.
The document was
printed by the Chicago Ac-
tion for Soviet Jewry and its
distribution to Congress
coincided with the Interna-
tional Day of Concern for
Soviet Jews.
Martynov's appeal is a re-
sponse to Russian journalist
Lev Korneyev, whose anti-
Semitic tracts include
numerous books magazine
pieces and newspaper arti-
cles that have been pub-
lished with approval of the
Soviet government.
As recently as Jan. 19,
1984, Korneyev's byline ap-
peared on page one of
Pravda on an article warn-
ing that Soviet •Jewish ac-
tivities of any type Would
not be tolerated, Porter
said.
Porter .also pledged his
assistance to the wife of a
recently arrested Soviet
Jewish refusnik during a
telephone conversation
.with her at her home in
Riga, Latvia.
Porter promised Tatania

Rabbi Marvin Hier, at podium, dean of the Simon
Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, was joined by several
hundred concerned citizens as he issued a strong statement
calling for the release of AnatOly Shcharansky and other
Soviet refusniks. The event, co-sponsored by the Women's
Campaign for Soviet Jewry, was one of many protest rallies
held around the world to mark the seventh anniversary of
Shcharansky's imprisonment. In addition to the emotional
pleas and speeches, a symbolic drama was also part of the
rally.

Zunshine during the call
from his Washington, D.C.
office that he would protest
her treatment by Soviet
authorities and ask for the
release of her husband
Zachar.
She said that she is being
followed by the KGB and
that agents had recently
roughed her up. She de-
scribed her situation as
dangerous and said that a
friend has been warned that
his legs will be cut off if he
helps the Zunshines.
Zachar was arrested in
Moscow on March 4 when he
renounced his Soviet citi-
zenship and was then
charged with-spreading
anti-Soviet propaganda and
defaming the Soviet state.
He is being kept in pre-trial
isolation.
The Zunshines for four
years have been denied
emigration to Haifa, Israel,
on the grounds that the
aunt and uncle they plan to
live with are not close
enough relatives.
Zachar lost his job as a
physics professor last sum-
mer under a Soviet rule that
refusniks are the first to be

cut when there is a reduc-
tion in force.
Mrs. Zunshine was re-
turned to her home Friday
after her disappearance two
days prior. Taken by three
KGB men, Tatania was in-
terrogated for three hours
and advised to stop working
on behalf of her husband.
Her internal documents,
confiscated on March 13,
have still not been returned
to her.
further
was
She
threatened with Article 65
of the Latvian Criminal
Code (Article 70 of the Rus-
sian Criminal Code) for.
"anti-Soviet slander."
Other Riga refusniks
tied to the case. include Ale-
xander Baiter. his wife,
Polina, and her mother
were both warned that Ale-
xander must stop helping
Zachar. Evgeny Baiter, who
was badly beaten on Feb.
24, left the hospital where
he was recovering from se-
vere injuries, afraid that
Soviet authorities would
place him in a psychiatric
hospital, •due to his remote
connection. the case.
Zunshine was recently
seen in the Riga prison.

Election set for July 23

Jerusalem (JTA) —
Likud and the Labor Party
agreed Wednesday that
elections will be held on
July 23. The government
and opposition promptly
signed an agreement
whereby the government
will call the Knesset into
special session early next
week for the first reading of
a bill to dissolve the Knesset
and approve the election
date. A special session is re-
quired because the Knesset
began its Passover recess
Wednesday.
The bill in question is the
Labor motion for early elec-
tions which the Knesset ap-
proved last Thursday by a
61-68 margin. It must pass
three readings to become fi-
nal.
The law requires a 100-
day interim from the time
the Knesset votes to dis-
solve itself until election
day. But the two sides agree
to shorten that period to 60

days. Within that time
frame, all- civil servants and
commissioned officers in the
armed services must submit
their resignations if they
wish to run for elective
office.
The July 23 date repre-
sents a compromise reached
after several days of hard
bargaining between Pre-
mier Yitzhak Shamir and
Labor Party Chairman
Shimon Peres.
Labor wanted the shor-
test possible campaign, end-
ing before Israelis go abroad
for their summer vacations,
and proposed some im-
provement by next fall,
argued for elections at the
end of October.

It is customary in some
communities to sprinkle the
Sabbath halla with raisins
and seeds as a reminder of
the manna that fed the
Children of Israel in the
desert.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan