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June 30, 1978 - Image 24

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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24 Friday, Noe 30, 1918

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THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Harvey Prize 'Winner Aiding
the World's Food Resources

TEL AVIV — With the ing the world's food sources to adverse environmen-
world population increasing is fast becoming a vital
tal conditions, while of-
by
two percent a year and necessity. For Tel Aviv
fering high protein con-
Call Stacy Barris
food consumption by 0.4 University Prof. Itzhak
tent and higher yields. .
399-7788
percent per person, increas- Wahl's contribution to-
He then makes available
::.z:;:mmsmnmm:5;ma::::mmizz,,,,,,MMo.,',:mi
wards improving and in-
to the agricultural world
creasing world crop produc-
the seeds of these wild
tion, he is being awarded
species, which are indigen-
ALL HAND MADE
the $35,000 Harvey Prize on
ous to the Fertile Crescent
June 28.
and are progenitors of culti-
The Harvey Prize is
vated wheat, barley and
awarded by the Technion
oats.
only
I %.0%, •
Prof. Wahl explains the
"in recognition and encour-
importance of maintaining
agement of scientists who
genetic diversity in develop-
have made truly outstand-
ing new crops species. With
ing contributions to the
the agricultural efficiency
progress of humanity."
of
the present generation
Prof.
Wahl,
director
of
Tel
SLACKS
and largely for economic
Aviv University's Institute
and agro - technical reasons,
of Cereal Crops Improve-
uniform types of crops,
ment, has been collaborat-
reg. $35.-$50 .
which offer higher yield and
ing with over 30 countries
nutritive value, have been
— "irrespective of their
planted on a wide scale.
political orientation," he
m points out — supplying
Since these crops are bred
24750 Telegraph at 10 Mile,
on a very narrow genetic
germplasm (genetic re-
next to Du nWi Dona
base, they are similar in
Daily to 6 p.m. SUN. 11 - 4 THURSDAY to 8 P.M.1.4 sources for cultivated
*:05Ermi ,-Emi:::amm.sw=m1====si :,"Mwomm:?;,:•na plants) for the improvement
vulnerability, and when
of crops in those countries.
new crop diseases develop
Taking advantage of
which these crops are not
capable of resisting, the
Israel's "natural re-
sources," — age-old na-
damage is far more wide-
spread than if a variety of
tive populations of wild
wheat, wild barley, and
types had been planted.
wild oats — Prof. Wahl
One such example is the
and his associates select
1970 U.S. corn crop, which
and study these wild
suffered a 14 million ton re-
duction when a new race of
species gaining informa-
tion about their protec-
pathogenic fungus wiped
tive mechanisms and
out large acreages.
building reservoirs of
Widening the genetic
germplasm, which con-
base of cereal crops,
tain genetic sources of
while preserving the
most favorable charac-
resistance to disease and

FREE Estimates

FINE TROPICAL SUIT

$1 a=

sr

FINE SPORT COATS
$7950

$1 750m$35

Hf,,f,EtNLi n g i ionnAs

EARLY
DEADLINE

The Jewish Piews

has

an early deadline of
noon today for local

publicity to appear in
the issue of Friday, July
7: Materials not re-
ceived by the deadline
will be withheld and
published the following
week if still timely.

Temple

Emanu-El

Cordially invites you to attend

SUMMER SHABBAT EVE SERVICES

In The West Garden of the Temple (weather permitting)
The services in July will all begin at 8 P.M. They will be conducted
by member families of the congregation. Families are welcome.

July 7 - THE PARR FAMILY
July 14 - CANTOR ROSE AND FAMILY
July 21 - THE FALK FAMILY
July 28 - THE SCHULMAN FAMILY

Temple Emanu-El

14445

West Ten Mile, Oak Park

Rabbi Milton Rosenbaum
Rabbi Lane Steinger

967 4020

-

Cantor Norman Rose
Dr. Stuart Falk, President

teristics, is all-important
in producing crops of the
highest yield and protein
content which are also
disease and weather re-
sistant. Prof. Wahl and
his team of scientists ex-
tract the important gene-
tic material from wild
grain populations, which
have passed the test of
time and demonstrated
continued resistance to
damage.

Synagogue fl Services

ADAT SHALOM. SYNAGOGUE: Services 6:30 p.m.
today and 9 a.m. Saturday. Sandra Shapiro, Bat
Mitzva.
TEMPLE BETH EL: Services 5:30 p.m. today. Rabbi
Schwartz will speak on "American Jews or Jewish
Americans — Where Do We Stand?"
CONG. BETH SHALOM: Services 6 p.m. today and 9 a.m.
Saturday. Daniel Ginis, Bar Mitzva.
BIRMINGHAM TEMPLE: Services 8:30 p.m. today.
Rabbi Wine will speak on "Affluence — Should We
Stop Now?" Temple high school graduates will be hon-
ored.
CONG. BNAI DAVID: Services 6:30 p.m. today and &30
a.m. Saturday. Avery Goldstein, Bar Mitzva.
TEMPLE EMANU - EL: Services 8:15 p.m. today. Gregory

Shaya, Bar Mitzva.

TEMPLE ISRAEL: Services 8:30 p.m. today. Rabbi Loss

will speak on "When Rabbis Meet." Stanford Megdall,
Bar Mitzva. Services 11 a.m. Saturday.

TEMPLE KOL AMI: Services 8:30 p.m. today. Rabbi Con-

rad will speak on "Halakha: A Bond of Unity Among

American Jews?" Services 10:30 a.m. Saturday. Ken-
neth Stitelman, Bar Mitzva.

CONG. MISHKAN ISRAEL NUSACH H'ARI: Services

9 p.m. today and 9 a.m. Saturday. Rabbi Gottlieb will
speak on "Theory and Practice."

Regular services will be held at Cong. Bais Chabad of
Farming-ton Hills, Cong. Bais Chabad of West Bloomfield,

Cong. Beth Abraham Hillel Moses, Cong. Beth Achim,

Cong. Beth Isaac of Trenton, Temple Beth Jacob. Cong.

Beth Jacob-Mogain Abraham, Cong. Beth Tefilo Emanuel
Tikvah, Cong. Beth Tephilath Moses of Mt. Clemens, Cong.
Bnai Israel-Beth Yehudah, Cong. Bnai Jacob, Cong. Bnai
Moshe, Cong Bnai Zion, Cong. Dovid Ben Nuchim,
Downtown Synagogue, Livonia Jewish Congregation,
Cong. Shaarey Shomayim (10 Mile Jewish Center), Shomer
Israel (13440 W. Seven Mile), Cong. Shaarey Zedek, Cong.
Shomrey Emunah, Cong. T'Chiyah Young Israel of Green-
field, Young Israel of Oak-Woods and Young Israel of
Southfield.

First Bay Area
Jewish Guide

SAN FRANCISCO—The
first Jewish Guide to the
San Francisco Bay Area has
been published by Hillel
Academy of the East Bay,
located in Oakland.
The 200-page guide cov-
ers the Bay Area from
Salinas to Santa Rosa and
east to Livermore. All kinds
of resources and services are
listed including museums,
Tel Aviv University has libraries, social services, ar-
also established a tists, entertainers,
germplasm bank and parks synagogues, newspapers,
for wild grain populations to book stores, and many other
safeguard and preserve the, facets of the Bay Area
valuable genetic treasures Jewish community. In-
of these wild cereal crops.
cluded are vignettes of early
U.S. Agriculture De- California Jewish history
partment expert for inter- and explanations of Jewish
national affairs, Quentin traditions.
West, recently cited past
Copies may be ordered
successful agricultural from Hillel Academy of the
cooperation as sound East Bay, 330 Euclid, Oak-
reasoning for establishing a land, Calif., 94610. There is
joint U.S.-Israel Trust Fund a charge.
for further cooperative re-
search and development.
Youth Body Seeks
He told a U.S. House ap-
propriations subcommittee WZO Membership
that the discovery of plant
NEW YORK — The Na-
resistance to crown rust in tional Youth Commission of
Israeli wild oats "has led di- the United Synagogue of
rectly to the development of America unanimously re-
rust-resistant oat varieties solved to apply for member-
which now occupy about ship status in the World
one-third of the oat acreage Zionist Organization — the
in the southern United first component of the Con-
States."
servative movement to take
Israel's wild barley has the step, which adds 32,000
led to "superior barley var- to the membership rolls the
ieties" for U.S. producers, WZO-Youth Division.
said West. This wild grain
United Synagogue of
material was discovered America's youth division is
and studied by Prof. Wahl comprised of United
and his Tel Aviv University Synagogue Youth and
associates in collaboration Kadima, the former for high
with the scientists of the school students, and the lat-
U.S. Department of Ag- ter for youth in grades five
riculture.
through eight.

Synagogue Holds
Classes on Ethics

The sisterhood and men's
club of the Downtown
Synagogue will sponsor a
series of adult education
classes on Jewish ethics be-
ginning 10:30 a.m. Sunday
at the synagogue.
The sponsoring commit-
tee is headed by Dr. Eugene
Stone, cultural chairman.
Joseph Weiss, president of
the men's club and vise
president of the synagogue,
will represent the men's
club. Mrs. Fred P. Sweet,
president of the sisterhood,
will represent the women's
group.
The classes will take

place one Sunday a month,
and are open to the public
without charge.

Beth Moses
Sale Completed

The sale of Beth Moses
Synagogue at Evergreen
and Seven Mile Rd. was
completed Friday. The

building was sold to the
Crosstown Missionary Bap-
tist Church.
Final ritual services will
be held July 8 at the Everg-
reen building. The congre-
gation is now part of Cong.
Beth Abraham Hillel Moses

in West Bloomfield.

Convention Head

NEW YORK — Prof.
David Sidorsky of Columbia
University, chairman of the
American Zionist Youth
Foundation has been named
chairman of the American
Zionist Federation biennial
convention.
The meeting will be held
at Grossinger's Hotel Nov.
12-14.

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