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June 30, 1978 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1978-06-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, lose 30, 1918 23

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Sga0 POOL
DOCTORS

Cancer Research Is Topic of Tel Aviv University. Pane

TEL AVIV— A panel dis-
cussion on new develop-
ments in cancer research,
which took place at the 10th
annual meeting of the board
of governors of Tel Aviv
University, was a platform
for medical discussion of in-
ternational experts, due to
the unusual composition of
the TAU board of governors,
which includes several
world famous scientists,
among them Prof. Albert

Sabin, who developed the
polio vaccine, and Prof. Sol
Spiegelman, a molecular
biologist and cancer re-
searcher from Columbia
University.
The three panel members
were Prof. Ronald Herber-
man, head of the Im-
munodiagnosis Laboratory
at the National Cancer In-
stitute in Bethesda, Md.,
Prof. Bracha Ramot, of Tel
Aviv University's Sackler

Iranian Invited the Israelis
to Asian Games Meeting

By HASKELL COHEN

(Copyright 1978, JTA, Inc.)

Chaim Glovinsky, execu-
tive secretary of the Israeli
Olympic Committee, has
stated that recent wire ser-
vice stories emanating from
Bangkok and Tel Aviv stat-
ing that the representatives
of the Israeli Olympic
Committee appeared "un-
invited to the Asian Federa-
tion Games Committee
meeting in Bangkok" were
untrue.
Glovinsky said he, Yit-
zhak Caspi and Yitzhak
Ofek were invited to attend
the meeting by Asghar
Paryravi of Iran, first vice
chairman of the Games
Committee and a secretary
of the International Olym-
pic Committee. The invita-
tion was extended to the Is-
raelis at the International
Olympic Committee meet-
ing which was held in May
in Athens.
According to Glovinsky,
the Japanese supported the
Arab delegation in insisting
that Israel be excluded from
the 1978 Games. However,
the Japanese made it clear
to every fellow member that
the Israelis were not to be
excluded from future Asian
Games, and definitely were
not to be dropped from the
roster of countries compris-
ing the Asian Sports Feder-
ation.

It was finally resolved
that the Israelis would
not participate in the var-
ious competitions in De-
cember, but would be ex-
tended an invitation to
the next set of Games,
four years hence. The
reason for the 1978 exclu-
sion, supposedly, is the
inability of Thailand to
provide the necessary
security.

Upon learning of the deci-
sion of the Asian Games
Federation, via wire service
reports, Col. Don Miller,
executive director of the
United States Olympic "
Committee, called
Glovinsky at his home and
received a verbatim report
about what had transpired
at the Bangkok conference.
Miller promised that the
U.S. Olympic Committee
would do everything in its
power to try to get the Asian
group to reconsider.
Miller said he was con-
vinced that Lord Killanin,
of Ireland, the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee
chairman, would remove
the International Olympic
Committee's sanction from
the Games until such time

as the Israelis are permitted
to participate.

School of Medicine and head
of the Hematology Dept. of
Sheba Medical Center, an
affiliate of TAU, and Prof.
Isaac Witz, TAU cancer
immunologist.
While. presenting an
overview of the field of
cancer immunology, Prof.
Herberman issued a stern
warning against the dan-
gers of smoking. He said
that it is estimated that
within two or three years,
lung cancer is likely to be-
come the leading killer in
the world, but that if
everyone would stop smok-
ing, it may be significantly
reduced.

Prof. Spiegelman ob-
The Israelis, however, served that medical cir-
are moving forward suc- cles alone cannot solve
cessfully on another the problem of cancer by
front in international revealing environmental
sports competition. The hazards if society finds
Swimming Federation is these solutions unac-
sponsoring an eight- ceptable. He cited the
nation swimming com- strong tobacco lobby in
petition which will run the U.S. which has suc-
July 2-4 in Tel Aviv. Some ceeded in retaining a to-
of the best swimmers in bacco subsidy despite the
the world will participate known health hazard of
in the various events.
tobacco.

In order to make certain
the meet is conducted prop-
erly, the Israeli Sports Fed-
eration has invited Jack
Abramson, vice president of
the United States Commit-
tee Sports for Israel, a
member of the U.S. Olympic
Swimming Committee and
chairman of the U.S. Mac-
cabia Swimming Commit-
tee, to serve as director of
the meet.

English Jews
to Aid Israel Poor

LONDON (JTA) —
Anglo-Jewry will contri-
bute 2.5 million Pounds
Sterling ($4.5 million) this
year to Premier Menahem
Begin's special fund to re-
house 45,000 slum families
in Israel, the Joint Israel
Appeal announced.
It promised to raise the
money, following an appeal
by Leon Dulzin, Action
chairman of the Jewish
Agency, in addition to its
normal appeal for the next
12 months.

The target represents
Anglo-Jewry's share of
the $47 million already
budgeted by the agency
for the poor families spe-
cial resettlement project
this year. American
Jewry is to raise $36 mill-
ion this year and other
communities, including
Anglo-Jewry, $16 million.

The entire project will
cost $1.2 billion over the
next five years, half the sum
being provided by the Israel
government and half by the
Diaspora.

Economic Revival

JERUSALEM (ZINS) —
The Bank of Israel is pre-
dicting an economic revival
based on the fact that hous-
ing starts in January and
February were up 33 per-
cent over the last quarter of
1977.
Retail sales were up 9.4
percent, unemployment
was down 2 percent, exports
were up 24 percent and im-
ports up 14 percent.

Prof. Arye Szeinberg,
dean of Tel Aviv Universi-
ty's Sackler School of
Medicine, commented,
while puffing on a cigarette,
that recently published ob-
servations suggest a possi-
bility of genetic differences
in susceptibility to lung
cancer due to differences in
activity of an enzyme which
converts material in the
cigarette smoke into car-
cinogenic substances.
By measuring the activ-
ity of the enzyme it thus
might be possible to identify
people particularly suscep-
tible to these substances
and to thus issue a particu-
lar warning to them. The
results relating to the activ-
ity of the enzyme are rather
controversial, but research
conducted by Prof. Szein-
berg's group in Israel tends
to support the existence of
different levels of suscepti-
bility. More research should
be done before final conclu-
sions are drawn, he felt.

Prof. Sabin commented
that in addition to environ-
mental factors which are
hazardous to the health,
there are environmental
factors which appear to be
protective, such as eating
citrus fruits and raw veget-
ables, which appear to have
a protective capacity
against certain types of car-
cinogenic stimuli. He re-
commends that more re-
search be done on such en-
vironmental factors.

Prof. Ramot discussed
research presently being
done in Israel on intesti-
nal lympathic cancer,
which afflicts Arabs and
other non-Ashkenazis
and is prevalent in cer-
tain under-developed
countries.

Prof. Witz discussed the
importance of cancer im-
munology research which
concentrates directly on the
site of the tumor, as an un-
derstanding of the immune
reaction can be crucial in
diagnosis, treatment, and
one day perhaps even pre-
vention of cancer.

John Furman, chairman
of the Israel Cancer Associ-
ation and member of Tel
Aviv University's board of
governors, chairing the
panel discussion, said that
the Israel Cancer Associa-
tion has awarded 162 re-
search grants in the past
five years, totalling
$750,000.

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