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July 19, 1974 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1974-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Working Groups on U.S. Aid Pact Weizmann Institute's Pekeris to Get Coveted Columbia Prize
NEW YORK — Chaim Leib the earth's magnetic field. 1929 to 1931 and later taught cal physics group. He held
Set Into Motion on Simon Visit Pekeris,
Distinguished Insti-
With his associates at the

JERUSALEM (JTA)-
Plans to create a cavinet level
committee to handle econo-
mic relations between the
United States and Israel were
approved Wednesday at a
meeting here between Sec-
retary of the Treasury Wil-
liam Simon and Finance
Minister Yehoshua Rabino-
witz.
The set up four working
groups to implement the
agreement and agreed to
meet again in November in
Washington to discuss the
progress of the groups which
will make studies of the pos-
sibilities of American private
investment in Israel, raw
material supplies, technical
aid and expansion of trade.
Israeli officials reported
that Rabinowitz repeated to
Simon the Israeli govern-
ment's request for an addi-
tional $1,500,000,000 in mili-
tary aid over the next three
years, stressing that Israel's
defense burden was very
high.
Simon said, at a meeting
with Rabinowitz and Com-
merce and Industry Minister

Israel Welcomes
Young Leadership
Family Mission

TEL AVIV — Thirty-three
families, including 90 chil-
dren age 4-17, are partici-
pants in the first United
Jewish Appeal Family Mis-
sion. The adults are all mem-
bers of the UJA Young Lead-
ership Cabinet.
The family mission con-
cept was developed to enable
American Jewish families to
share a highly emotional and
educational experience
among themselves and with
Israeli families, to better
understand the basic impor-
tance of Jewish unity and
the American Jewish com-
munity's relationship with
the people of Israel.
It is personal contact de-
veloped along the way that
lends the mission its special
flavor.
Former Russian activists
David and Esther Markish
came to the hotel to visit the
Joel Sprayregens of Chicago
—whom they had met on the
family's last visit to Israel
—and stayed to discuss with
mission members the prob-
lems of Russian immigration
and adjustment in Israel.

A tall, red-checked kibutz-
nik, age 96, gave visitors to
Kibutz Hephziba his own per-
spective on history. He told
how he had set out on foot
from Siberia to Palestine 76
years ago. He walked all the
way to Greece, the old kibut-
znik said, then sailed to
Palestine where he helped
found the agricultural school
at Kineret and Kibutz Re-
havia.

Bulgarian Honor

SOFIA (JTA) — The Bul-
garian government recently
awarded Col. Mayer Albu-
haire Salomon "The Order of
September 9, 1944," for his
service in the Bulgarian
army and his contribution to
the fight against Nazism.

Haim .Barlev, that he hoped
the United States would con-
tinue providing massive eco-
nomic aid to Israel despite
growing opposition in Con-
gress to foreign aid in gen-
eral. He said he believed
that investments in Israel
were economically worth-
while.
Barley asked the American
official for reasonable terms
to buy some $800,000,000 of
equipment in the next seven
years. Barley also asked for
a reduction of customs duties
between Israel and the U.S.
and aid for the development
of industrial research.
Simon arrived in Israel
T u e s (1 -a y night from Cairo
where he had discussions
with President Anwar Sadat
and Egyptian officials.
In a statement replying to
Rabinowitz's welcome at Ben-
Gurion Airport, Simon de-
clared: "I promise you that
we will be helpful in every
way we can with the help
and the assistance that has
been so characteristic of our
relationship these past years
and which reached its peak
during our President's recent
visit here."
He noted that his visit in
the wake of the visits by
Mr. Nixon and Kissinger
"attests to the migh import-
ance by country attaches tc
the exceptionally close ties
which have developed be-
tween our countries in recent
years. Now we stand on the
threshold of a new era in
these relations, as expressed
in the joint statement of June
17 by President Nixon and
Prime Minister (Yitzhak)
Rabin."
Israel was Simon's second
stop on a two-week tour of
the Middle East and Europe.
He left for Saudi Arabia
Thursday and is then sched-
uled to go to Kuwait, West
German y, France and
Britain.
Simons three days of talks
in Egypt reportedly concen-
trated on guarantees for
American investments in
Egypt and liberalization of
Egypt's economic system.
Simon said he had assured
Sadat that he would have an
answer soon on how much
grain Egypt would receive
from the U.S. under the Food
for Peace program, but he
added that Egypt would not
get all the wheat it wants
from the U.S. alone.

University in Buffalo
Offers Yiddish Class

BUFFALO (JTA)—An in-
troduction to Yiddish Course
will be offered next fall by
the State University of Buf-
falo for the first time. Dr.
Philip Veit, professor in the
Germanic and Slavic depart-
ment, will teach the course.
He said the department
hopes to stimulate ethnic in-
terest in' the language and
also to serve students in
linguistics. He said that while
the course is not listed with
the university's Judaic stu-
dies department, students
may use it as a credit toward
their degree in Judaic Stu-
dies.
Dr. Veit said the Yiddish
course was organized in re-
sponse to student demands
for it.

tute Professor at the Weiz-
man Institute of Science at
Rehovot, has won Columbia
University's 1974 Vetlesen
Prize in the earth sciences.
Columbia President Wil-
liam J. McGill said Dr. Pe-
keris was cited as "an out-
standing pioneer in the ap-
plication of advanced beth-
ods of applied mathematics
to the solution of a wide
range of fundamental geolo-
gical and geophysical prob-
lems."
The Vetlesen Prize—a gold
medal and $25,000 — recog-
nizes - "achievement in the
sciences resulting in a clear-
er understanding of the earth,
its history, or its relation to
the universe." It has been
called the Nobel Prize of
the earth sciences.
Dr. Pekeris is known for
his studies of convection
within the earth, propaga-
tion of sound in layered
media, tides computed on a
global scale and certain
properties of the helium atom.
His work on the modes of
free oscillation of the earth,
the Vetlesen jury note d,
"will certainly become a clas-
sic."
He has also worked on the
quantum theory of two-atom
molecules and the theory of

Weizmann Institute, Dr. Pe-
keris designed and construct-
ed three computers, among
the fastest in the world of
their type and, the jury
stated, "uniquely fitted foi
geophysical problems."
His classic paper on the
"Theory of Propagation of
Explosive Sound in Shallow
Water" in 1948 guided much
later research in seismology,
and his calculations of fre-
quencies at which the earth
vibrates when jarred by
earthquakes also provided a
foundation for rapid advances
in seismological science.
In 1959, with an associate
at Weizmann institute Dr.
Pekeris computed heights and
times of the occurance of
ocean tides on a global basis
and using the computers at
the institute.
A U.S. citizen, Dr. Pekeris
joined the Weizmann Insti-
tute as head of its depart-
ment of applied mathematics
in 1949. He relinquished this
post in 1973 when he was
honored by the school with
the title Distinguished Insti-
tute Professor.
Born in Lithuania, Dr.
Pekeris is a graduate of the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, where he was a
Guggenheim Fellow from

geophysics. In 1941 he be-
came a staff member of the
Division of War Research at
Columbia University and in
1945 he was named director
of the university's mathemati-

this post until his move to
Israel in 1948.
The Vetlesen Prize will be
presented to Dr. Pekeris at
an awards dinner in New
York Oct. 24.

20—Friday, July 19, 1974

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Police Minister Warns Increase
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JERUSALEM (JTA) — Po- I ginning of the year crime has I
lice • Minister Shlomo Hillel increased steadily and in a
has warned the Knesset that noticeable degree. "We are
any cuts in the police budget passing through a character-
in line with the new economic istic and difficult. post-war
policy may hamper police phase now," he said.
protection of citizens from
"Potential offenders have
criminals and terrorists.
amassed considerable quanti-
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He said the damage which ties of firearms as a result I
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Hillel, making his annual
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the problems that budget cuts erations, said • the ministry
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Hillel indicated that the a new crack border police
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can be postponed, but not operations.
protecting citizens.
Israel's police deparment
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Hhe said that since the be- also has purchased lightarms
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of Yeshiva U. Dies

NEW YORK (JTA) — Dr.
William A. Rosenthal, dean
of Yeshiva University's
Wurzweiler School of Social
Work and associated with its
school since its beginnings
in 1957, died July 12 at his
home in Staten Island at age
54.
A veteran social worker
andn educator for 25 years,
Dr. Rosenthal had been a
member of the Wurzweiler
School since 1962. He was
appointed assistant professor
in 1966 and associate pro-
fessor of social work in 1970.
In 1972, he was named act-
ing dean and in 1973, dean.
During the 1968-69 aca-
demic year, he seiwed as
consultant at Bar-Ilan Uni-
versity school of social work.
As consultant, Dr. Rosenthal
aided Rockland Community
College in formulating a cur-
riculum for its Human Serv-
ices Program, which has a
unique relationship with the
Wurzweiler School.

1974
CITY TAXES

ALL 1974 CITY TAX BILLS
HAVE BEEN MAILED

A number of properties are listed on the 1974 tax rolls as
OWNER UNKNOWN. If you have failed to receive your tax
statement, please request duplicate by phone, 224-3560, by
mail, or in person at the City-County Building as interest must
be added if not paid by August 31, 1974. TO FACILITATE
PHONE CALLS IT IS REQUESTED THAT THE WARD NUMBER
and ITEM NUMBER BE lKNOWN.

FIRST HALF DUE
AUGUST 15

ROBERT J. TEMPLE
TREASURER
CITY OF DETROIT

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