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November 09, 1973 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1973-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Jewish Leaders Insist They're Standing Firm
on Jackson-Mills-Nanik Bill Despite Pressure

By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
JTA Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON (JTA) —
American-Jewish organiza-
tional leaders declared Tues-
day that they will maintain
full support for the Jackson-
Mills/Vanik legislative pro-
posals affecting Soviet emi-
gration policy.
This conclusion emerged at
a meeting- with senators
Henry M. Jackson (D.,
Wash.) and Abraham Ribi-
coff (D., Conn.), the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency was in-
ormed by Capitol Hill
sources.



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The leaders made clear
that there is absolutely no
change in their position of
full support for the legisla-
tion sponsored in the Senate
by Jackson and in the House
by Rep. Wilbur Mills (D.,
Ark.) and Charles A. Vanik
(D., Ohio) and backed by
overwhelming bi-p artisan
support.
Speculation had arisen that
if the proposed legislation,
which bars tariff equality
and credits to the Soviet
Union until it ends emigra-
tion restrictions on any of
its citizens, were to be
dropped, the Soviet govern-
ment would be more amen-
able toward softening its
position against Israel in the
current Middle East crisis.
Despite the contradictions
in the Soviet and American
policies toward the Middle
East, the Nixon administra-
tion steadfastly favors grant-
ing both equal tariffs and
credits to the Soviet Union,
as it had pledged in the
Soviet-American agreement
announced months ago.
The Jewish leaders' meet-
ing with the senators, which
lasted about 40 minutes, cli-
maxed a-round of discussions
they have had in Washington
during the past two weeks on
both the Jackson-Mills Vanik
proposals and the Middle
East situation, JTA was told.

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Administration aides have
been reported to have asked
Jewish leaders not to press,
at present, for passage of a
specific denial of most-
favored-nation status to the
Soviet Union and to take a
hands-off position if congres-
sional leaders desired to drop
Title Four of the trade bill
which bans this status.
Practically, the argument
was presented, the result
would be the same. The
Soviet Union would not have
equality in tariffs either way
since MFN is prohibited to
it under present law. Inclu-

sion of Mills-Vanik legislation
or the Jackson Amendment
in the trade act would serve
to stigmatize the Soviet gov-
ernment anew.
Some Jewish leaders, it
was said here, sympathized
with the administration view
in the light of current Soviet-
American relations and were

*

*

Soviets Allow
4,200 to Leave
During October

Meany Gets
AJC Award

NEW YORK —

George
Meany, president, AFL-CIO,
has been named as the first
recipient of the American
Jewish Committee Demo-
cratic Heritage Award, it
was announced by Elmer L.
Winter, president of the
American Jewish Committee.
• Presentation of the honor
will take place at a dinner
Dec. 17 at the Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel in New York.
The tribute to Meany will
be made by Justice Arthur
J. Goldberg, past president
of the American Jewish Com-
mittee. Theodore W. Kheel,
noted labor mediator and
impartial chairman of the
Trari-sit Industry of New
York, is serving as chairman
of the event.

Jewish Hospitals
Hit by Walkout

LONDON — According to
diplomatic sources in Mos-
cow, it was reported that
4,200 Jews were allowed to
emigrate in October. The
previous record was set in
September, when 3,650 Soviet.
Jews were granted exit visas.
The Soviet Union has
allowed 28,000 Jews to leave
the country so far this year,
sources said.
Meanwhile, Valery Panov,
the ballet dancer whose ap-
plication for a visa to Israel
has been blocked for 19
months, has announced he
and his wife have begun a
hunger strike in protest of
the Soviet government's re-
fusal to let them leave.
The 35-year-old Panov was
dismissed from the Kirov
troupe in Leningrad after he
asked for an exit permit in
March 1972. He said that
since the dismissal, he and
his wife, dancer Galena Ra-
gozina faced "professional
death."
Panov said he was ready
to starve himself "to the
end" and his wife will stop
before she is too weak to
care for him.

NEW YORK (JTA)—A va
riety of emergency proced-
ures were put into effect
Wednesday at the 15 Jewish
hospitals and homes which
were among the 48 voluntary
institutions here hit by a
strike of 30,000 technical ser-
vice and maintenance work-
ers.
The walkout which began
Tuesday was called by Local
1199 of the Drug and Hospital
Workers which represents an
estimated 9,500 workers in
the 15 Jewish institutions
which have some 8,000 pa-
tients, many of them bed-
ridden.
Spokesmen for the Jewish
homes and hospitals like
those of the other affected
facilities said the effects of
the strike might be severe
on the elderly patients.
William Abelow, executive
director of the League for
Voluntary Hospitals and
Homes which negotiates for
the 48 institutions, said that
generally the member insti-
tutions had stopped admit-
ting nonemergency cases late
last week and postponed some
nonvital operations. He added
that some institutions had
sent recuperating patients
home. All outpatient clinics
canceled activities Wednes-
day.

40th Annual Meeting

NEW YORK — The Jewish
Labor Committee will open
its 40th anniversary conven-
tion here Nov. 16 at the
Roosevelt Hotel.
Albert Shanker, president
of the United Federation of
Teachers, and a group of
liberals and educators will
hold a discussion on "Labor
Meets the Press." The eve-
ning session will honor the
founders of the JLC.

prepared to tell congressional
supporters of Jackson-Mills
Vanik that they would not
object to dropping of Title
Four if its congressional spon-
sors desire.
The House is now sched-
uled to debate and vote on
the Trade Reform Act of 1973
next week. The Mills-Vanik
legislation, as presently
amended to the trade act,
prohibits equality of tariffs,
or most-favored- nation treat-
ment, but says nothing about
credits. However, Congress-
man Vanik had been author-
ized by the Rules Committee
to request a House decision
on credits which were elimi-
nated from- the amendment
on jurisdictional grounds in
the Ways and Means Com-
mittee.
The vote on his motion will
test the strength in the House
of the measure as a whole.
The feeling in the Capitol at
present is that the House will
adopt the Mills-Vanik pro-
posal as its sponsors origi-
nally had set forth.

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS
riday, November 9, 1973-19

Christadelphian
Gift to Israel

It was reported from Lon-
don this week that a gener-
ous bequest was made to the
Jewish National Fund by the
late Edwin George Speak-
man, a Christadelphian.

He had made numerous
visits to Israel and became
fond of the Jewish state. In
his will he left a part of the
residue of his estate to the
JNF Charitable Trust, re-
questing JNF to plant trees
on the slopes of Sanhedrya.

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