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June 21, 1968 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1968-06-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Civil War Medal of Honor Winners

TH/S /5 THE
CONGRESSIONAL
MEDAL a cHONOR,
THE H/Gliesi
UN/TED STATES
M/L/TARY
OECoRATIOA!
AWARDED FOR,
GALLANTRY AT
THE R/S1.< of
1./FE.,

t.f7'

AND THIS /S LEOPOLD KARPELES,
FIRST AMER/CAN ✓EW 70
RECE/VE TH/S GREAT HONOR .

BORN IN PRAGUE /4/4933, KARPELES CANE ro
TEN yEARC LATER-
THE CMIITED STATES MI /85-0.

D/D YOU HEAR THE NEWS,)
"--- - __
LeoPoLD? THERE'S
WAR BETWEEN T,YE 1
.STATES./
-.

4

4,130t/E AND BEYOND

TR4' CALL of ot/rY.

FOR FOUR YEARS, lc,4RPELEs

FOUGHT His COUNTRY:5 BATTLE.

KARPELES, YOU& WON
YOUR SERGEANT'S
STR/PES TODAY/

THANK YOU, 5/R. BUT,,,

MOST OF ALL, I'D LIKE
TO CARRY THE

UN/ON FLAG/

NNE./ /4/4- 2L

ADD ONE WORD —
YO!/ ARE NOW

COLOR SERGEANT'

KARPELES/

I I'

iwpezEs THOUGHT lea REACHED
THE TOR THEN ON MAY 6, /(5'65',„

Zwr SGT. IcARPELEs REFUSED To
LEAVE. MORE THAN THAW,,

zer's

SAVE OUR COUNTRY
FIRST! DON'T RETREAT 1
RALLY ROUND THE FLAG,

MEN./

LATER, Sc;?: KARPELES WAS CALLED
TO WASH/A/Oro/V.

AT THE BATTLE OF THE
W/LOERNESS, HE RALL/ED
THE TROOPS AND CHECKED
THE Apt/ANC/NG ENEMY.
FOR THIS BRAVERY...

FoR THIS BRAVERY
D/0 SGT. LEOPOLD
KARPELES REcE/VE
H/5 COCINTRY IS
hi/GI/EST AWARD,
THE CoNGRESS/oNAL.
MEDAL OF
HONOR .

This cartoon and story are reproduced from "A Picture Parade of Jewish History" by Morris Epstein,
published by Shengold Publishers, New York, by special arrangement with the author and publishers.

The Civil War has been called the Union Army, but the other four
the Brothers' War. It was actually fought for the Confederacy.
On the eve of the Civil War there
that in many cases, for Jews as
well as non-Jews. Take the Jonas were about 175,000 Jews in the
family, for example. Abraham United States. Many had made
Jonas, a friend of Abraham Lin- *heir way as peddlers, with packs
coln, had five sons. One was in on their backs, to all sections of

Rah Announcements

June 15—To Dr. and Mrs. Shel-
don Stoffer (Phyllis Raub), for-
merly of Oak Park, now of Lex-
ington, Ky., a daughter, Lori Beth.
*
June 15—To Dr. and Mrs. Ger-
aid M. Letzer (Barbara Bertin),
4424 Stoney River, Birmingham, a
daughter, Kim Ilene.
* *
June 14 — To Dr. and Mrs.
Murray J. Gould (Ellen Black-
man of Los Angeles), now resid-
ing in Oakland; Calif., a daughter,
Tamara Lynn.
*
June 14—To Mr. and Mrs. Em-
ery Grosinger, (Roberta Kirstein),
22882 Pontchartrain, Southfield, a
son, Eric Bradley.

June 9—To Mr. and Mrs. Har-
vey A. Gallison (A nn Karen
Schwartz), 19230 Magnolia, South-
field, a daughter, Tracey Lyn.

*

*

*

June 4—To Dr. and Mrs. Phillip
Goodman (Judith Brenner), former
Detroiters of Tampa, a daughter,
Lisa Hope.
* *
June 4—To Mr. and Mrs. Jay A.
Stevens (Gloria Parzen) former
Detroiters now of Des Plaines, Ill.,
a son, Craig Michael.

May 24—To Mr. and Mrs. Alan
Silver (Susan Green), 24772 Rens-
selaer, Oak Park, a daughter, Feli-
cia Beth.

4:

*

*

May 19—To Mr. and Mrs. David
McColl (Ronna Feiler), 3825
Crooks, Royal Oak, a son, Daniel
Louis.
*
*
May 18—To Mr. and Mrs. Ber-
nard Lis (Betty Langnas), 18767
Goldwin, Southfield, a son, Kevin
Rodney.
* * *
To Mr. and Mrs. David M.
Kahrnoff (Patricia Barnett), 24011
Ithaca, Oak Park, an adopted son.

A good imitation is the most per-
fect originality.—Voltaire.

the country. Jewish communities
were fairly well organized, and the
first representative American Jew-
ish body, the Board of Delegates
of American Israelites, had been
formed.
In 1860, Lincoln was elected
President and the slavery question
boiled over. Southerners, who grew
cotton, felt that slavery was nec-
essary and proper. Since North-
erners were not cotton growers,
they could see slavery as the evil
it was. Jews as a body took no
action for or against slavery, al-
though many prominent Jewish
leaders stood in the front ranks
of the anti-slavery movement.
On Feb. 4, 1881, the South
withdrew from the Union. The first
shots were fired at Fort Sumter in
South Carolina on April 12. The
Civil War had begun.
North and South, Jews rushed

to the colors, and many reached
high positions. Judah Philip Ben-
jamin, U.S. Senator from Louisi-
ana, was appointed Secretary of
State in the South and was called
"the brains of the Confederacy."
Senator David Yulee of Florida,
who announced the secession of his
state, had been the first Jew to
serve in the United States Senate.
The first Surgeon General of
the Confederacy was David de
Leon, and the Quartermaster Gen-
eral was A. C. Meyers. Frederick
Knefler attained the highest rank
of any Jew in the Union forces.
Volunteering as a private, he was
repeatedly cited for bravery, and
became a brigadier general, with
temporary rank of brevet major
general.
There were thousands of un-
decorated and forgotten heroes,
and there were seven Congression_
al Medal of Honor , recipients,
whose recorded acts of bravery
are a permanent part of American
history.
The medalists were Leopold Kar-
peles; Benjamin B. Levy, for sav-
ing a vessel; Abraham Cohn, for
rallying troops under fire; David
Obranski, for gallantry at Shiloh
and Vicksburg; Henry Heller, for
bravery at Chancellorsville; Abra-
ham Grunwalt, for valor. in Ten-
nessee; and Isaac Gans, for cap-
turing an enemy flag.
In Washington today, souvenirs
of Karpeles' life are displayed in
the Bnai Brith Exhibit Hall. In
our capital, too, is the National
Archives Building. On it is an in-
scription which links our lives to
those who died so that our coun-
try might be whole again.
The inscription says: "What Is
Past Is Prologue."

34—Friday, June 21, 1968
THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

Bernstein's First Podium
Leonard Bernstein became as-
sistant conductor of the New York
Philharmonic Orchestra at the age
of 25 in 1943.

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