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March 24, 1967 - Image 32

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 1967-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Americana Theater to Open in Area

UDC Work-Study Program Set Up for Students

NEW YORK—An overseas work-
study program, under which
American Jewish college students
will work this summer for Jewish
communities overseas, was an-

Bulgaria to Show TV Film
With Yiddish Commentary
on Reichstag Fire in '33

SOFIA, Bulgaria (JTA)—A one-
hour television documentary, with
Yiddish commentary, has been
prepared here by a Jewish tele-
vision producer, for broadcast soon
on the Bulgaria Television Net-
work. The program, "The Reich-
stag Fire," recalls the burning of
the German Parliament building
in Berlin, in 1933, for which the
Hitler government blamed the
Communists, although the con-
flagration had been arranged by
the Nazis as a provocation.
The chief defendant falsely
charged by the 'Nazis with blame
for the fire was a Bulgarian Com-
munist then living in Germany.
Produced by Niuma Belagowski,
in association with some prominent
Bulgarian journalists, the program
features among others Josef Wulf,
historian and West Berlin corres-
pondent of The Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, and author most recently
of "The SS State." Wulf voiced his
commentary in Yiddish on the
steps of the burned-out Reichstag,
declaring that that conflagration
was "the beginning" of the Nazi
rule. "The rest," he said, "follow-
ed, culminating in Auschwitz."

THE AMERICANA THEATER

The newest theater in the metro- lion and sound system are expected
politan area. t he Americana, Green- to be among the finest in the area.
field north of Nine Mile Rd., South-
Nicholas George Theaters in-
field, will open in mid-April. it was clude the Allen Park, Camelot,
announced by Nicholas George Grand Circus and Mai Kai Theaters
Theaters.
and the Jolly Roger, Fort George,
The theater is on a 10-acre site Michigan and Galaxy Drive-Ins. '
providing parking for more than
The opening attraction for the
800 cars. Nearly an acre of park Americana will be Otto Preminger's
Kill be in the area lighted by torch "Hurry Sundown," starring Michael
lights along the circular drive from Caine, Jane Fonda, Diahann Car-
Greenfield to the entrance.
roll. Burgess Meredith and Jim
The front of the theater is high- Backus.
The manager of the Americana
lighted by Mehl protective canopies
will be Bud Leaman, who has been
of white marble aggregate.
transferred from the Mai Kai. Ben
To the left of the lobby area, is
Katlin, a former theater owner,
a lounge with sofas, chairs and a
will he the new manager at the
television set
Mai Kai.
The auditorium seats 1,750. Its
walls will be covered with plush
New Screen Rights
carteting, a new idea in theater
Robert 'L. Lippert has acquired
design to p-oxide better acous-
screen rights to "Requiem For A
tics in a concrete structure and
Fallen Soldier," an original story
to continue the elegance and de-
by Earl Holbrook. Frank Wood
cor of the lobby throughout the
currently developing "Berkeley"
auditorium.
for producer Lippert, prepares also
The screen. described as one of the "Requiem," with Peter Duryea
the largest in the city, will be 65 serving as the model for the prin-
feet wide. Technically, the projec- cipal role of the American soldier. 32—Friday,

CHECKER BAR-E-11

UNDER NEW
MANAGEMENT

RIBS • CHICKEN • SHRIMP

FEATURING FAMILY STYLE BROASTED CHICKEN

Complete Dinner Menu

OPEN 9:30 a.m. 'to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Monday

3 Blks. N. of 12 Mile

Carry-Out Service

Enchanting Oriental Atmosphere

Open Mon. thru Frl. 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m.
Sat. 11 a.m.-II:30 'p.m.; Sun. Noon-10:30 p.m.
Combination Dinners Every Weekday

Spectaltzmg

871

Cantonese Food

Open Daily 11 a.m.-11 p.m. — Sat. 11 a.m..2 a.m.
Free Parking
Carry-Out Service
LI 7-4663
13715 W. 1 MILE RD., OAK PARK

CHINESE-AMERICAAVRESTAURANT
Lunches • Dinners - Carry Out
Di 14460
1916 W. 7 Mile at Wyoming
OPEN: SUN. NOON-10:30 P.M.;
MON thru THURS., 11-10:30 P.M.
FRI.. 11.1 A.M.; SAT.. 11-3 A.M.

Open I1 a.m. to
3 a.m. Deily
Famous Chop Suey • Cantonese Food • Steaks • Chops • Sea Food
EASY PARKING
CARRY OUT SERVICE
TO 1-7550
322 W McNIchots, SM. Woodward & Second

WING HONG

Chinese-American Restaurant

18203 W. 10 Mile Rd. at Southfield
353-6417

Restaurant
Delicatessen

DANNY'S

(formerly Joey's)

DELICATESSEN-
RESTAURANT

CHOICE LIQUORS
BANQUET FACILITIES

Specializing in
Family Dinners
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
Mon. thru Fri. 11-10:30 p.m.
Sat. 10 - 1 a.m. Sun. 12 Noon-I0 p.m.

Parking Facilities , . . Carry-Out Service

7101 PURITAN—Open all a.m. to 3 a.m.—UN 1-3929

PARADISO CAF E

BUSINESSMEN'S LUNCH SPECIAL

VANNELLI'S

Restaurant & Cocktail Lounge

10 a.m. to 9 p.m.

• Luncheons • Dinners

PRIVATE ROOMS FOR
BANQUETS AND PARTIES

Famous for American & Italian Food
For Over 25 Years
• Steaks • Chops • Seafood
15300 Woodward
Free Parking
TO 9-6040

M ID-EASTERN

50 MANCHESTER
PHONE TO 6-4333
HIGHLAND PARK

ALI BABA

Off Woodward
Open Daily 3 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Sat. 6 p.m. to 2 a.m. Closed Sun. & Mon.
Specializing In Shiskcbah. Stuffed Grape Leaves, Steaks and Chops.
Entertainment Nights. No Cover. No Minimum

PANCAKES AND WAFFLES

GOLDEN GRIDDLE

PANCAKE HOUSE

Home Of The
GOLDEN WONDER WAFFLE

• 42 Varieties of 'Pancakes &
Featuring Parfait Ples•—Key Lime,
Waffles
12 Delicious Varieties of Eggs & e'c•
Omelets
6:30 a.m. to 1 a.m. Sun. thru Thurs.
• Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Fri. 'til 2:30 a.m. Sat. 'til 3:30 p.m.

3017 N. WOODWARD, Royal Oak

549-2900

POLYNESIAN

LUNCHES - DINNERS
PASTRIES - WAFFLES AND
OUR SPECIAL FRENCH TOAST
Carry-Outs, Distinctive Buffet Trniy Catering .
Finest Corned Beef Sandwiches and
Sandwich Combinations
Amok, Parking

UN 3-3298

OPEN DAILY 7 a.m. to I a.m. — Sat. to 2 a.m.

Closed Tuesday
• Breakfasts • Lunches • Dinners • Sandwiches
Complete Carry-Out Service
Your Host—GEORGE FINK

25290 Greenfield, N. of 10 Mi. Rd.

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK



Seven Days a Week

19171 Lirernols at 7 Mile

Banquet room available
Fine American and Italian Food

..
.,pe n daily 11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.
COCKTAIL BAR
CLOSED SUNDAYS
17632 WOODWARD — North of 6 Mile
TO 9-3988

Cantonese

DELICATESSENS

EMBERS

ITALIAN FOODS

Specializing in Pizza Pie and Famous Italian Foods

Specializing in Cantonese Cuisine

HOA KOW INN

l i t 10

ENTERTAINMENT NIGHTLY AFTER 2 A.M.



MARIA'S PIZZERIA

Private room for parties — Businessmen's Lunches
Ii, Harvard Row Shopping Center at 11 Mile and Lahser Rd.
Orders To Take Out
356-4750

HOUSE of
CHUNG
KOW KOW INN

Delivered "HOT" — UN 4-7700
20050 Livernois, Just South of 8 Mile

EL 6-9222

CHINESE FOODS

-

THE DETROIT JEWISH NEWS

BARBEGUE

Mcg

EMPRESS
GARDEN

New Rosenberg Role
Stuart Rosenberg has been signed
by Paramount to a four-picture
deal. A former television director,
he made his feature film debut with
Warners forthcoming "Cool Hand
Luke" and is currently preparing
for the same studio's filmization of
"The Job Hunter."

March 24, 1967

CHICKEN

SMORGASBORD Wed. & Fri.
29501 NORTHWESTERN

nounced by Charles H. Jordan ,
Joint Distribution Committee ex-
ecutive vice president.
Many will serve as summer re-_
placements for vacationing com-
munal workers in France, Italy,
Morocco, Tunisia, Iran and Israel.
Some will be working as counsel-
lors in day camps and summer
camps. Others will be assigned to
children's centers, transit camps,
and other JDC-supported installa-
tions, or in JDC offices. In all in-
stances the applicants will have
to be fluent in the language of the
country to which they are assigned.
Although most of the openings are
for girls, there will also be a few
assignments available for male stu-
dents.
The students will be paid local
wages in the areas where they will
be stationed. Fare 'to and from
the country is to be paid by the
students.
Male college students are also
being invited to apply for a uni-
versity mission being organized by
the United Jewish Appeal. The
UJA study mission, which will
consist of a limited number of
male students, will entail a cost of

LI 7-4533

OPEN MO SN
A . T 7H ,T
RU L F2 RIA
. :T m IL 12 P.M.

s
• Dinners
• Breakfasts Clo se •d Lunches
After-Theater Specialties
TRAY CATERING A FEATURE
17244 W. 7 MILE RD.
Special Children's
15 •LOCKS E. OF SOUTHFIELD)
Menu

Delicatessen-Restaurant

273-4130

CHIN TIKI

WEALhigMEXCrisTI4Tiral-lutTNIST

OPEN 7 DAYS 'TILL 2 A.M.

• Exotic Tropical Cocktails and Food
• Buffet Luncheons
2121 CASS (N. of Gd. River)
962-1434

SEA FOODS

CLAM SHOP

TR 4-2870

Serving Oysters, Clams, LOBSTERS, Steaks and Assorted Sea Foods

Music by Muzak

CARL'S

CHOP HOUSE

2,675 E. GRAND BLVD.

STEAKS. CHOPS. ETC.. I

3020 GRAND RIVER.-

Parking.

TE 3-0700

Private Banquet Rooms for wedding parties. Serving
the World's Finest Steaks. Chops and Sea Foods for
more than 26 years. All Beef aged in our cellars.

$1,185 per student. The students
will visit France, Germany, Austria,
Poland, Morocco and Israel where
they will hold discussions with
local college students and be brief-
ed by local Jewish leaders on prob-
lems confronting the Jewish .com-
munity. They will also tour and
study various services and agen-
cies supported by UJA funds, and
other sights of interest.

Danny Raskin's

LISTENING

0
S

T

SANFORD DECKER, young
sculptor, now practicing at the
Common Grounds of Arts, is the
mold master of the beautiful statue
in Dan Laven's Central Heating
office ... a bronze scholarly man
sitting on a high stool . . . All
casting was done by Sandy and
the marble base completely pol-
ished by him . . Sandy is a stu-
dent of the Society of Arts and
Crafts and Wayne State U., where
he is completing his academic
studies ... Next stop is Cranbrook
for his master's degree.
• • •
SAM WILSON took time out
from his busy C.P.A. duties during
income tax time to appear last
week, on TV show "Juvenile
Court" over Channel 4 . . . Sam
took the part of a drunken car-
penter who keeps losing his job
and can't support his family, so
oldest son gets into trouble . .
Sam finally learned what "pre-
empt" means in TV . . . Was to
have appeared at an earlier date,
but show was cancelled for an-
other program . . . Vic Hurwitz.
producer of the program, is a
client of Sam's.
• s •

A CHINESE KOSHER dinner
(a la Jennie Grossinger) is the fare
for the cabaret night by Livonia
Jewish Congregation, at the syna-
gogue, Saturday night . . . it's the
shule's. annual fund-raising affair.
with Jimmy "Groucho" Rachleff
emceeing, plus four acts . . . Ed-
die Schwartz, chairman, has tickets
... Call him at KE 7-7974.
• • •
MARTIN BAND, builder, and his
interior decorator wife, Sue, took
their two daughters, Brenda, 10,
and Leslie, 8, to see a matinee per-
formance of "The Bible" . . . On
the ride home, the girls were ques-
tioning their parents about the dif-
ferent characters, such as how old
they were, was the whole earth
really all water, and so on . . .
Thinking this was a good oppor-
tunity to get their little minds to
think through problems and stimu-
late their curiosity, Sue told them
that they should question anything
they hear or read . . . "For in-
stance, figure this one out. If
Adam and Eve were supposed to
be the only two people in the whole
world, how could their son, Cain,
go to another land and find himself
a wife?" . . . A moment of dead
silence followed, and the profound
thought came from little Leslie .. .
"He walked !"
• • •
ON VACATION IN Massachu-
setts, Marion and Roy Katz were
shown the local sights by a vener-
able citizen of the little town they
were visiting . . . His pride and
joy was a neat monument mark-
ing the Spot where the original
settlers had a bloody encounter
with the Indians .. . "Who won
the battle?" asked Roy innocently
... The venerable citizen regarded
him with some disguest, then an-
swered slowly, "Well, sir, the In-
dians didn't built the monument."

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