100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 15, 2019 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

8

Thursday, August 15, 2019
The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com
NEWS

By Gary Larson
(c)2019 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
08/15/19

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

08/15/19

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

Release Date: Thursday, August 15, 2019

ACROSS
1 “Cheers” cheer
5 Lyft or Uber
8 Makes fun of
13 Melville’s “Typee”
sequel
14 Seafood delicacy
15 “Oh, darn!”
17 E-cig user’s
package
19 Dollhouse
accessory
20 Playground retort
21 ER “Now!”
23 “What fun!”
24 Place for an
apian colony
27 Married person
30 “Furthermore ... ”
31 Keats’ “Sylvan
historian”
32 Actor McShane
and novelist
McEwan
35 Fields of study
39 Come to a
compromise
... and a
homophonic hint
to what each of
four long answers
contains
43 Offspring
44 Merrie __
England
45 Alumna bio word
46 “Argo” setting
48 One of the four
Evangelists
51 Self-arming
protection system
56 May, to Peter
Parker
57 North-of-the-
border brand
58 Kick to the next
level
62 Scribe
64 Beach party with
shellfish
66 Inhumane one
67 The whole lot
68 Frank
69 Flows slowly
70 Chi follower
71 Gridiron play

DOWN
1 Super star
2 “Rubáiyát” poet
Khayyám
3 One may be tied
around a saddle
horn

4 Chinese dish
with pancakes
5 Torah holder
6 Composure
7 Picayune
8 Fisher-Price
parent
9 Need to pay
10 “Mommie
Dearest”
mommie
11 Buckwheat dish
12 Ranch critter
16 Goblet part
18 Outback hoppers
22 Cut down to size
25 Teutonic
turndown
26 Morales of “La
Bamba”
27 Basic math
homework
28 Help the chef
29 Draft card
designation
33 More than
apologizes
34 Org. with
Canadiens and
Canucks
36 Poet St. Vincent
Millay
37 Astro or Angel
38 Car radio button

40 Drawstring
alternative
41 Crucifix letters
42 Painted Desert
landform
47 Heads off
49 Airport
conveyance
50 1997 chart-
topper for
Hanson
51 Bear hands
52 Mysterious glows

53 Like some
remarks
54 Music licensing
fee-collecting
org.
55 Takes it easy
59 Nickname for
Haydn
60 Hawaiian strings
61 Rollerball items
63 Ability to pick
things up?
65 Boxing legend

CENTRAL CAMPUS,
FURNISHED rooms for students,
shared kitch., laun
dry., bath.,
internet, rent from $700 and up. Call
734‑276‑0886.

FOR RENT

Classifieds

Call: #734-418-4115
Email: dailydisplay@gmail.com

Admissions more selective, new data shows

First-year acceptance rate decreased, average ACT score increased compared to last year’s admitted students

Early numbers from the University
of Michigan Office of Undergraduate
Admissions show a lower first-year

acceptance rate and stronger ACT
and grade point average scores
compared to last year’s admitted
students.
The first-year acceptance rate
decreased by 0.08 percent, while
the transfer student acceptance
rate increased by 3.3 percent and

the number of transfer applications
decreased from last year. The
admitted students’ average GPA rose
by 0.02 points and ACT test scores
rose by one point in the middle 50th
percentile ACT score range, while
the SAT test scores see no noticeable
change.

LSA freshman Sukainah Khan
wrote in an email to The Daily she
believes high test scores and the
increasingly
competitive
college
process correlate with the use of
prep books and tutors, which are
primarily available to higher-income
students.
“Increasing
test
scores
definitely
indicates
an
upward
trend in academic excellence and
competitiveness, but it also brings
a certain degree of uniformity to
the student body,” Khan wrote.
“Certain academic results correlate
to demographic factors that have
contributed to students’ ability to
succeed. There’s a reason why a large
percentage of the student body at UM
comes from high-income families.”
LSA sophomore Isabella Yockey
attended Northville High School,
a school that regularly sends a
high percentage of students to the
University. She said the school
offers a multitude of resources to
keep students on the college track,
such as counselors, tutors and
representatives from the University.
“At Northville, they took a lot of
pride on their SAT and ACT scores,”
Yockey said. “They offered a lot of
help with raising your scores, in the
counseling office they offered a lot
of resources to find tutors and go to
classes. ... We worked really close
with our counselors to make sure we
were on the right track.”
Yockey said she believes the

help Northville offered her gave
her an edge when applying to the
University. She said she thinks
in-state high schools who are unable
to offer as many resources may be at
a disadvantage from an admissions
perspective.
“I think it’s unfair in the sense that
the schools don’t have the resources
to give their students,” Yockey said.
“I think that since (Northville) is a
wealthier area, the biggest difference
is that we were able to be given those
opportunities.”
Business sophomore Ariana Khan
agrees with Sukainah Khan, stating
in an email to The Daily she believes
test-prep classes play an important
role in the increase in test scores.
To
combat
this
socioeconomic
disparities in college applications,
Ariana Khan created RealU, a
company that gives low-income
and first-generation students an
opportunity to receive mentorship
from a college student.
“Many lower-income and first-
generation students did not have
the opportunities and access to
connections of experienced adults in
their field of interest,” Ariana Khan
wrote. “For this reason, many of the
students feel lost in the application
and college search process. We hope
to make the college search process as
easy as possible to ensure students
can enter college confidently.”

MICHAL RUPRECHT &
JIALIN ZHANG
Daily Staff Reporters

ALEC COHEN/Daily

Read more at michigandaily.com

Back to Top

© 2023 Regents of the University of Michigan