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March 21, 2018 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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Beginning in January 2020,

all
University
of
Michigan

Greek life organizations will
transition to a winter semester
rush process, according to a
University press release.

The move comes a semester

after the Interfraternity Council
suspended all social activities
for two months after reports
of hazing and sexual assault.
Allegations
included
hazing

that placed fraternity recruits in
near-death situations, drugging
members
in
undisclosed

fraternity
chapters
and
a

number of claims of sexual

misconduct involving fraternity
brothers.
At
a
closed
IFC

meeting in November, members
urged each other to vote for the
ban so as to avoid sanctions from
national bodies.

Starting in the 2019-2020

school
year,
students
will

need to have completed at
least 12 academic credits at
the University and be in good
behavioral
and
academic

standing to be permitted to
rush. This policy is already in
place at many other universities,
including Indiana University.

Neither IFC nor Panhellenic

representatives responded to
requests for comment.

“We have studied the impact

of recruitment practices on
first-year
students
in
the

first semester on campus and

Aiming
to
highlight

marginalized
students
on

campus and promote social
acceptance, LINK: Connecting
Cross-Cultural Gaps Through
a Common Language, a talent
showcase hosted by student
organizations
Redefine,
the

Vietnamese Student Association
and Zeta Omega Eta at the
University of Michigan, was
held Tuesday evening.

The showcase, which featured

speakers, dance groups, spoken-
word, art, film and comedy,
among other art forms, drew
about 100 students, faculty and
community members. Before
the speakers took the stage,
attendees were able to browse
photography exhibits and visual
art from over 40 different artists
who
aimed
at
representing

diversity among humanity.

The event began with a

dialogue between two students,
featuring a video that voiced
the necessity of stripping away
labels. In comparing labels to
the cars we drive, the video
explained we should focus on
what’s on the inside rather than
what is initially seen by the
outside observer.

“Who would you be if the

world never gave you a label,
never gave you a box to check?”
the video narrator said. “Would
you be white, Black, Asian,
Mexican,
Middle
Eastern?

No. We would be one. We’d be
together, no longer living in
the era of calling human beings
Black people or white people.
These labels that will forever
blind us from seeing a person for
who they are, but instead seeing
them through the judgmental,
prejudicial, artificial filters of
who we think they are.”

Hawra Altaee, a University

alum and clinical therapist, was
the first speaker at the event and
detailed her experiences fleeing
from violence during the Persian
Gulf War. Altaee was born in
Iraq amid the war, and explained

when she was an infant, her
family fled to Saudi Arabia
where they were promised a
few weeks in a refugee camp.
Instead, they were forced to
remain for four years with
limited living conditions in
the desert. In 1995, her family
was given the opportunity to
be randomly selected to come
to the United States and as she
continued her academic career,
her experiences led to a passion
for social work.

Altaee encouraged attendees

to recognize the choices given
between allowing struggles to

stop or halt future endeavors
versus
using
them
to
our

advantage. She highlighted the
ambition she saw in the room
and gave her best wishes to
those present in pursuing future
goals, however large or daunting
they may initially seem.

“We have a choice as to

whether we allow our struggles
and our circumstances and
our hurdles to motivate us
or whether we allow them
to be a chip on our shoulder
and to hinder us,” Altaee said.
“Everybody in this universe

The University of Michigan’s

Central
Student
Government

convened
Tuesday
night
to

discuss issues of gender inclusion
and the promotion of the use of
green books. The penultimate
meeting of the seventh assembly
centered most of its discussion
on the upcoming CSG election,
which will determine the newly
elected representatives for next
year’s assembly.

The meeting began with the

reintroduction and the passing
of various resolutions. These
included a resolution to promote
green books, a resolution to fund
the remaining amount of the CSG
AirBus deficit and a resolution
to
encourage
gender-neutral

language where appropriate.

The meeting then moved into

executive communications, in
which CSG executives delivered
some of their final announcements
to the current assembly. CSG
president Anushka Sarkar, an LSA
senior, confirmed the installation
of Wi-Fi on the Diag, as well as a

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Wednesday, March 21, 2018

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SEVEN YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

‘U’ Greek life
to delay rush
beginning in
Winter 2020

Carol Anderson talks new book
about racial divides, disadvantages

See RUSH, Page 3A

CHRIS FCASNI/Daily

Carol Anderson discusses her book “White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Nation’s Divide,” at Forum Hall in Palmer Commons Tuesday afternoon.

ADMINISTRATION

Policy aims to improve 1st year climate
after allegations of widespread hazing

MAYA GOLDMAN &

RIYAH BASHA
Daily News Editor &

Managing News Editor

“White Rage” explores reactions of white population to Black freedom struggles

Speaking on systemic barriers

in
place
throughout
U.S.

history, to African Americans’
advancements in society, was

Emory
University
professor

Carol Anderson, who highlighted
her book “White Rage: The
Unspoken Truth of Our Nation’s
Divide” as part of a talk hosted by
the Donia Human Rights Center
at the University of Michigan
Tuesday.

“It is the presence of black

people
who
achieve,
who

aspire, who refuse to accept
subjectation, the presence of
black people who demand their
civil rights,” she said as she
began the talk, explaining the
factors that contribute to white
rage.

Anderson
built
upon
this

notion
by
describing
how

the quality of education and
segregated
school
systems

have fundamentally impacted
African-American students. She
explained how even though the
Brown v. Board of Education
decision desegregated schools

NESMA DAOUD

For The Daily

CSG talks
green book
usage, fair
campaigns

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

2nd last assembly meeting
concluded with reps urging
all to get votes ‘cleanly’

DANIELLE PASEKOFF

Daily Staff Reporter

IBRAHIM IJAZ/Daily

Arabesque dance team TeamLoyal performs dabkeh at Redefine’s cross-cultural event Link in the Union Ballroom
Tuesday.

Over 100 students participate in LINK,
cultural showcase fostering social unity

Speakers. dance groups, art, and film presentations highlighted marginalized voices

JORDYN BAKER
Daily Staff Reporter

Purple Squirrel
Statement contributor

Yoshiko Iwai reflects on

her experience overloading,

overworking and

overextending herself as a

University student.

» Page 1B

See WHITE RAGE, Page 3A

Shannon Briscoe, a senior

secretary in the Admissions
Office of the University of
Michigan’s
Law
School,

currently drives to work from her
home in the Whitmore Lake area
of Livingston County. Google
Maps estimates this trip to take
around 20 minutes, pending
traffic. For Briscoe and others in
similar situations, the Ann Arbor
Area Transportation Authority’s
proposed express bus service
carrying commuters from this
area to the University’s campus
and downtown Ann Arbor would
be a valuable alternative.

“I currently get off of the

freeway now at the Eight Mile
exit, which is where the proposed
stop for it is,” Briscoe said. “I
definitely would leave my car
there and take this service into
and out of Ann Arbor, depending
on the times of day it is offered.”

If implemented, this service

would run on U.S. Route 23,
connecting a Park & Ride Lot
on Eight Mile Road with top

See BUS, Page 3A

AAATA to
implement
new US 23
bus service

CITY

For commuters, route
offers valuable alternative
to driving into campus

ELIZABETH LAWRENCE

Daily Staff Reporter

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

Check out the
Daily’s News
podcast, The
Daily Weekly

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 95
©2018 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See DIVERSITY, Page 3A

statement

THE MICHIGAN DAILY | MARCH 21, 2018

See FAIR, Page 3A

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