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February 22, 2017 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily

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NEW SUDOKU WHO DIS?
puzzle by sudokusyndication.com

2A — Wednesday, February 22, 2017
News
The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

After bipartisan pressure,

the Michigan state legislature
modified its initial proposal
from
one
which
would

completely
eliminate
the

state’s 4.25-percent income
tax to one that will gradually
lower the tax to 3.9 percent
over four years.

This change occurred after

nine
university
presidents

from public schools across
the
state,
including
Mark

Schlissel, president of the
University
of
Michigan,

gathered Tuesday morning in
front of the House chamber
to lobby against the original
proposal.

The university presidents

were
concerned
the

elimination of the income tax

would lead to constraints in
the state’s budget, potentially
a gap of more than $1 billion
in the first fiscal year and
subsequently
decrease

university
funding.
The

presidents
cited
concerns

such
as
higher
education

inaccessibility and the rising
cost of a college education as
reasons for opposing the bill.

Schlissel
expressed

concern the tax cuts would
prevent
universities
from

providing higher education
at a manageable cost for
families across the state. He
also said the proposal would
negatively affect community
infrastructure.

“Our fear is that if the

resources available to state
government are constrained
by such a large tax cut, we
won’t be able to maintain
accessibility to a great higher

education at the same cost
now,” Schlissel said to the
Detroit Free Press. “Families
are already struggling to pay
for college, and we don’t want
to
make
those
challenges

greater. It’s not just higher
ed, it’s community colleges,
it’s schools, it’s infrastructure
we’ve promised our fellow
citizens we’re going to take
care of. It’s the aid we return
to our cities that allows them
to provide services to our
fellow citizens.”

According to the Detroit

Free Press, Gov. Rick Snyder
had also expressed concern
over the original tax plan and
the loss of revenue, remarking
that the situation should be
researched more thoroughly.

“The governor is always

open
to
new
ideas
and

welcomes the discussion on
tax reform,” Anna Heaton,

Snyder’s
press
secretary,

told the Free Press. “For this
particular proposal, there
would need to be concrete
data to demonstrate that
there is adequate revenue
from sources besides the
income
tax
to
ensure

services for residents and
investing in our statewide
infrastructure would not be
adversely affected.”

In
a
press
release

following the announcement
of
the
change
Synder

expressed his pleasure with
the change.

“I appreciate that House

leadership took seriously
my concerns about the long-
term impact of the proposal,
but I still have a billion
dollars worth of concerns
because there has been no
plan presented as to how
this will affect residents
and
their
communities

statewide.”

On Wednesday morning,

420 Maynard St.

Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327

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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter terms by students at the
University OF Michigan. One copy is available free of charge to all readers. Additional copies may be picked up at the Daily’s office
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REBECCA LERNER
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ALEXA ST.JOHN
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Assistant News Editors: Kevin Biglin, Caleb Chadwell, Heather
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CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Poetry Reading

WHAT: Author Amorak Huey,
a Grand Valley State University
professor, will read from his
poetry collection “Ha Ha Ha
Thump.”

WHO: Crazy Wisdom Poetry
Circle

WHEN: 7 p.m.

WHERE: 114 S. Main St.

Kotaro Fukuma Guest
Recital

WHAT: Kotaro Fukuma, an
award-winning international
concert pianist, will perform a
“Home Country” set.

WHO: School of Music, Theatre
& Dance

WHEN: 7:30 p.m.

WHERE: Earl V. Moore, Britton
Recital Hall

Social Area Brown Bag

WHAT: Join Daniel Molden,
a visiting professor from
Northwestern, presents on
understanding self-regulation
failure based on recent research.

WHO: Department of
Psychology

WHEN: 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

WHERE: East Hall, Room 4464

Holocaust Survivor
Speech



WHAT: Holocaust survivor
Roma Solent will give a talk
on his memories from the
Holocaust.

WHO: Jewish Graduate Student
Union

WHEN: 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

WHERE: Munger Graduate
Residences

University Symphony
Orchestra

WHAT: Conductor Christopher
Kendall will lead a performance
of two works by Arthur Honneger.
The winners of a concerto
competition will also perform.
WHO: School of Music, Theatre
& Dance

WHEN: 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.

WHERE: Hill Auditorium

Science Cafe

WHAT: This month’s cafe will
discuss our climates of the
past and future and discuss the
mechanisms of these changes
with Environmental Science
Professor Chris Poulsen

WHO: Science Cafes

WHEN: 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

WHERE: Conor O’Neill’s Pub, 318
S. Main St.

Faculty Author
Celebration

WHAT: Faculty who wrote
monographs published last year
will present their work and be
honored.

WHO: University Library
WHEN: 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

WHERE: Hatcher Graduate
Library, Gallery 100

RC Community Forum

WHAT: An open space to inform
students and faculty about
campus climate and community
concerns.

WHO: Residential College

WHEN: 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.

WHERE: East Quad Residence
Hall

Tweets
Follow @michigandaily

Planet Blue

@UMPlanetBlue

@UMich sustainability
progress spans education,
research & operations. View
highlights from #UMich200.

Dr. Mark Schlissel
@DrMarkSchlissel

@umich ranked No. 1 in
nation with 7 #SloanFellows,
the ‘most promising’ early
career scientific researchers.

Madison Marie Jones
@Maddie_Jones515

Remember life before
Snapchat filters?? I don’t
want to

Michigan Basketball

@umichbball

Are you @chadtough? V-O-
T-E for @JohnBelein in
#Coaches4Charity

Last week at a trail leading into

Nichols Arboretum, University of

Michigan medical student Daniel

Nadelman stumbled upon a dead

deer. Nadelman told MLive that

at first glance the deer appeared

to have been shot as a part of the

city’s cull from Jan. 30 to Feb. 6.

However, city officials say it was

not killed during the cull.

The Ann Arbor cull sparked

opposition from many residents.

At a City Council meeting

last January, many residents

chanted, “Stop the shoot,” and

organized a number of protests

and demonstrations against the

planned shoot. The latest cull

removed 96 deer from parks

and nature areas on University

properties, with an additional

54 female deer being sterilized,

according to an article on the city

of Ann Arbor’s website.

The remaining carcass

appeared to be partially eaten,

according to Nadelman. Tom

Crawford, Ann Arbor’s chief

financial officer, who oversaw the

deer cull, said each deer killed

during the cull was removed last

Thursday, leading him to believe

this one died of other causes.

Because of the dead deer’s

proximity to the train tracks, it

might have been hit by a train, yet

other possibilities still remain.

The deer could also have been

attacked by a predator or shot by

an outsider.

Nadelman also speculated

this was the same doe he had

seen before in the Arb with three

fawns.

“Several months ago, three

fawns were born in the Arboretum

and I watched them with their

mother every day until the hunt

began,” Nadelman said in the

MLive article.

- KEVIN BIGLIN

ON THE DAILY: DEATH OF DOE REMAINS A MYSTERY

HALEY MCLAUGHLIN/Daily

Independent scholar Ekaterina Mishina discusses the relationship between Presidents
Trump and Putin at a U.S.–Russia relations panel at the School of Social Work on Tuesday.

U. S . AND RUSSIA

MI legislation to reduce rate of
income tax following opposition

Plan to reduce income tax to 3.8 percent after university presidents vocalize concerns

KAELA THEUT
Daily Staff Reporter

See TAX, Page 3A

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