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February 22, 2017 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily

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If University of Michigan

College
of
Engineering

researchers
continue
to

prototype
their
innovative

work, you might soon be
receiving
packages
from

someone other than a mailman
— instead, a robotic bird.

The University will be the

first institution to program
and test “Cassie,” a robot with
the mobility of a bird and
the potential to transform
efficient energy usage. The
robot, created by the Agility
Robotics program at Oregon
State
University,
will
be

arriving at the lab belonging
to Jessy Grizzle, professor of

electrical
engineering
and

computer science. Grizzle has
also worked on robot bipeds
— machines that use two legs
to walk — similar to Cassie,
which takes the form of a large
bird. Grizzle is well-known
throughout
the
nation
for

his work on bipeds and has
collaborated with Oregon State
University before — which is
why Cassie will be tested by his
lab.

Grizzle
said
Cassie’s

inventors did not plan on
its
aviary
appearance,
but

tweaked their design when
mathematics proved that the
robot would perform better
with this form.

“Agility
Robotics
started

City
Council
voted

unanimously
Tuesday
to

postpone an initial vote on an
ordinance intended to protect
Ann Arbor’s undocumented
residents, citing a need to
tighten exceptions originally
provided in the ordinance.

The ordinance comes after

an executive order signed
by President Donald Trump
in January providing for the
removal of federal grants for
“sanctuary
jurisdictions,”

which the order defines as
jurisdictions that refuse to
assist
federal
agencies
in

identifying
and
detaining

undocumented
immigrants.

Additionally, implementation
memos for the order released
Monday expanded the federal
government’s
authority
to

allow lower jurisdictions to
carry out the duties of federal
immigration agencies.

At the Feb. 6 meeting

of City Council, members
unanimously
passed
a

resolution directing the city
administrator to review the
executive order and “provide
advice
regarding
possible

options or actions the city
might take to protect the
rights of the city and persons
within its jurisdiction.”

The ordinance proposed

Tuesday
would
prohibit

city employees from asking
residents
about
their

immigration
statuses,
but

provides several exceptions to
the prohibition. According to
the ordinance, city employees
would be permitted to inquire
into a resident’s immigration
status while assisting federal
law
enforcement
in
the

investigation of a criminal
or civil offense, or while
processing
an
arrested

person.

Ann Arbor resident Jessica

Prozinski said the exceptions
defeated the original purpose
of the ordinance, opposing it

on those grounds.

“The resolution, I believe,

had good intentions, as far as
strengthening Ann Arbor’s
don’t-ask-don’t-tell
policy,”

she said. “This resolution, I
think, has actually become

During
Central
Student

Government’s
Tuesday

meeting, a resolution to support
the
creation
of
a
Middle

Eastern and North African
racial category on University
of Michigan documents passed
unanimously.

LSA
Rep.
Devin
Jones,

SAFE member — one of the
four authors who identifies
as ME/NA — brought up the
discrepancies in how he was
classified in the U.S. census and
other
demographic
surveys.

Though
he
is
Palestinian

and the other authors of the
proposal were Lebanese, Jones
said they were all technically
classified as “white.” Jones
argued
the
demographic

surveys did not take Middle
Eastern heritage into account.

“In 1944, all Arabs were

marked as white in the United
States because whiteness was
a prerequisite for citizenship,”
Jones said. “That changed in
1952, but the status for Arab
Americans and others who are
Middle East and North African

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Wednesday, February 22, 2017

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-SIX YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

INDEX
Vol. CXXVII, No. 35
©2017 The Michigan Daily

N E WS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

O PI N I O N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S U D O K U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

CL A S S I F I E DS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

S P O R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Engineering
professor to
test bipedal,
robotic bird

Debbie Dingell highlights impact of
Affordable Care Act to crowd of 100

See ROBOT, Page 3A

ROBERT BUECHLER/Daily

Rep. Debbie Dingell (D–Dearborn) discusses the impact of the Affordable Care Act on students at Weill Hall on Tuesday.

RESEARCH

Jessy Grizzle, in collaboration with those
at Oregon State, will test the prototype

RASHEED ABDULLAH

Daily Staff Reporter

Current political discourse in GOP could repeal act which provides medical care to millions

Rep.
Debbie
Dingell
(D–

Mich.) accompanied a panel
at the University of Michigan
Ford School of Public Policy
Tuesday night to discuss the
impacts
of
the
Affordable

Care Act. The panel, hosted by
the University of Michigan’s
chapter of College Democrats
along with Progressives at the
University of Michigan, also
answered public questions to
an audience of approximately
100
students,
faculty
and

community members.

Panelists began by laying

out
facts
about
the
ACA

itself,
explaining
that
20

million previously uninsured
Americans
gained
health

insurance because of the act.
In
Michigan,
the
“Healthy

Michigan” plan reduced the
number of uninsured citizens
by 50 percent, allowing nearly
700,000 people in Michigan

to
gain
health
insurance,

according to Dingell.

The panel comes during a

time of concerns surrounding
a
possible
repeal
of
the

ACA from GOP lawmakers.
Panelists described the idea
of “repeal and replace” as
more of a slogan than a plan

JORDYN BAKER
Daily Staff Reporter

See CSG, Page 3A

CSG passes
resolution
for ME/NA
recognition

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

Middle Eastern authors
said they had to put ‘white’
on demographic forms

RHEA CHEETI
Daily Staff Reporter

JOSHUA HAN/Daily

Ann Arbor resident Kathy Griswold speaks about road crossings at a City Council meeting on Tuesday.

Concerns over federal funding delays
immigration ordinance at City Council

Residents and council believe previous legislation had too many exceptions

ANDREW HIYAMA

Daily Staff Reporter

michigandaily.com

For more stories and coverage, visit

See CITY, Page 3A

See DINGELL, Page 3A

Coach Jim Harbaugh traded

in his headset for a microphone
Tuesday night to judge the
annual Mock Rock charity
talent show at the University
of Michigan Power Center for
the Performing Arts, where
more than 200 students and
community
members
came

to
watch
student
athletes

help raise money for the local
mental health organization
Fresh Start Clubhouse.

Mock Rock is an annual

fundraising event organized
and led by the Student-Athlete
Advisory
Committee
and

the Ginsberg Center where
each year, the organizations
determine a local beneficiary
to donate the funds the show
raises to a place they feel
aligns
with
the
students’

passions.

Various
varsity
student-

athlete teams came together
to create original talent acts to
perform in front of their peers
to help fundraise money.

Last year, the organizations

chose to donate all proceeds

See ATHLETES, Page 3A

Student
athletes
perform
for charity

CAMPUS LIFE

Annual talent show,
benefit Mock Rock judged
by coach Jim Harbaugh

DYLAN LACROIX
Daily Staff Reporter

Looking in the Mirror
statement

The Push to Change History on Campus

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