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by the wayside in past years,
the
current
assembly’s
two

committees have put a particular
emphasis on obtaining this data
again.

However, the push to release

the data has sparked concerns
on campus, namely from faculty,
over potential biases and impact
on tenure. In October, the
Faculty Senate voted to delay the
public access of the numerical
evaluation data.

In response to the concerns,

CSG exceutives pointed to a
report released by the University
of Michigan Learning Analytics
Task Force, created in 2013 by
former Provost Phil Hanlon at
request of the Senate Advisory
Committee
on
University

Affairs. According to the report,
there is virtually no correlation
between
student
grades
and

perceived workload and biases
based on gender, race, ethnicity

or citizenship status in regard to
course evaluations. Chaired by
Physics Prof. Tim McKay, director
of the LSA Honors Program, the
task force was operated for three
years and consisted of faculty
members from several schools
and colleges.

Certain other parameters have

also been put in place regarding
the effects of the data release for
the instructors. Pitt said first-
year instructors will not have
their evaluation data released
publically.

Sarkar and Pitt said their

committees are the result of a
three-way partnership between
the CSG Executive Committee,
University
Provost
Martha

Pollock and the Faculty Senate.

“As Cooper and the rest of

the Executive Committee have
promised, students will now have
access to previously unavailable
information to improve their
course
selection
process,

including evaluation data, by
backpacking for the fall of 2016,”
Sarkar and Pitt wrote in a joint

e-mail.

Pitt also noted that along with

the course evaluation data, the
University is working on another
tool to aid in course selection. The
Academic Reporting Toolkit 2.0
is a website that aims to be a one-
stop shop for the course selection
process. Pitt said the tool will
contain information about not
only the professors who taught
the course and when, but also
the students who had previously
taken it — including their majors
and grades of an average student.

Pitt
said
CSG
executive

committee’s push for the release
of course evaluations stems from
recognizing the high cost of
University courses and wanting
students to be supplied with as
much information as possible
when selecting their courses.

“Students
are
paying

thousands of dollars for each and
every course that they take here,”
Pitt wrote. “Most are taking out
major student loans and many
are working between classes just
to be here. When we recognized

how little reliable information
there was to help students select
the courses that they spend so
much time and so many resources
on, we knew we had to make a
change.”

Pitt said during a CSG meeting

last
semester
that
releasing

course evaluation data will allow
students to form expectations
of courses without resorting
to third-party sources like the
website
RateMyProfessors.com.

In a later interview, he noted
that as an out-of-state student, he
and many others have particular
interest
in
accurate
course

information.

“Each course I take here costs

thousands of dollars and I’m
spending so much time and energy
to be able to be a student here
and it’s important that I can take
courses that actually contribute
to my growth and education,” Pitt
said. “I only have two sentences
to look at on the course selection
website, that doesn’t really give
me a basis from which to make a
decision.”

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HBD TO TWO AMAZING FRIENDS,
CLAIRE ULAK & CLAIRE ERWIN.
puzzle by sudokusyndication.com

Group hopes to
provide better

services for traveling

students

By MEGAN DOYLE

Daily Staff Reporter

On Sunday night, the Central

Student
Government
Detroit

Congress held a sparsely attended
monthly meeting in the Michigan
Union.

The
Detroit
Congress,

sponsored by the Commission
on Detroit Engagement, aims to
bring together various student
organizations and initiatives that
work in and with the city of Detroit
to collaborate and discuss Ann
Arbor’s connection to the Motor
City.

CSG
members
noted
that

attendance was down due to
sickness, as noroviruscontinues
to be present on campus. Three
student
organizations
were

represented at Sunday’s meeting:
Detroit
Revitalization
and

Business Initiative, Detroit Urban

Debate Education and Trotter
Multicultural Center organizers.

The
meeting
was
chaired

jointly by LSA sophomore Dylan
Bennett and LSA junior Rohin
Patel, co-chairs of the Detroit
Congress. Despite the low turnout,
Bennett said there are several
other student organizations who
have attended previous Detroit
Congress
meetings,
including

Detroit Partnership, JDs in the D
and Seven Mile Music.

Two of the three organizations

were new to the Detroit Congress,
according to Patel who said he
believes the lack of attendance
overall did not keep them from
having a productive conversation.

Sunday’s
meeting
focused

primarily
on
the
issue
of

transportation
difficulties
for

students traveling between Ann
Arbor and Detroit.

Several representatives voiced

concern that their organizations do
not have the resources to transport
people to and from Detroit.

Students who want to get

involved in Detroit are often
asked to drive their own cars to
downtown
Detroit,
attendees

said. They may also be asked
to pay for taxi cabs or Zipcars.
The organizations often have
the funding to reimburse their
members for their travel expenses,
but this places a financial burden on
those members to pay money out of
pocket before being reimbursed.

Currently,
the
University

runs the Detroit Connector, a
bus system that takes students
from the Central Campus Transit
Center to three different locations
in downtown Detroit which runs
four days a week.

However, LSA junior Alexis

Lowe, the representative from
Trotter
Multicultural
Center,

pointed out that because the
Connector requires an Mcard,

Detroit residents cannot utilize the
transit system to get to Ann Arbor.

“Because we hold cultural

events at Trotter, I think it’d be
really beneficial for Detroiters to
come up here for that,” Lowe said.

Lowe added that this would fill

the Connector during hours when
it is less-used by University of
Michigan students. She suggested
implementing a small fee for use by

2A — Monday, February 22, 2016
The Michigan Daily — michigandaily.com

THREE THINGS YOU
SHOULD KNOW TODAY

The
Michigan

women’s swimming
team won the Big

Ten Championship for the
first time since 2004.

>> SEE SPORTS ON 1B

2

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Film screening

WHAT: Prof. Teresa
Satterfield will host a
screening and discussion of
the film “The New Latinos.”
WHO: Latina/o Studies
WHEN: 6:30 p.m. to 8:30
p.m.
WHERE: Ann Arbor
Downtown District Library,
Multi-Purpose Room

Lecture on the
War on Terror

WHAT: Professor Amira
Jarmakani will host a lecture
on the representation of
Arabs and desert romances
in Western popular culture.
She will discuss this in the
context of U.S. imperialism.
WHO: Arab and Muslim
American Studies
WHEN: 11:30a.m. to 1 p.m.
WHERE: Angell
Hall, room 3222

Former Florida Gov. Jeb
Bush
(R)
announced

Saturday that he will
drop out of the race for

the GOP’s nomination after a
flagging campaign, the BBC
reported. He came in fourth
in Saturday’s South Carolina
primary.

1

Diversity
town hall

WHAT: The UM Library
will hold a town hall to
discuss how it can promote
inclusion, diversity, equity
and accessibility to the UM
community.
WHO: University Library
WHEN: 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
WHERE: Hatcher Graduate
Library, Gallery (room 100)

Bomb blasts in the
Syrian
cities
of

Homs and Damascus
Sundy
have
killed

more than 100 people,
the
BBC
reported.

The Islamic State has
claimed
responsibility

for both attacks, which
targeted areas populated
by Alawite and Shias.

3

Workout class

WHAT: Rec Sports will
organize a class that
combines zumba, yoga
and strength workouts, in
support of National Eating
Disorders Awareness Week.
WHO: Department of
Recreational Sports
(Rec Sports)
WHEN: 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
WHERE: Central
Campus Recreation
Building, room 2275

Art show

WHAT: Students, faculty
and staff of North Campus
will present their art and
poetry in this annual
showcase. Some works
will be published in the
Blueprint Magazine.
WHO: Maize Pages
Student Organizations
WHEN: 10 a.m. to 11:59
p.m.
WHERE: Duderstadt
Gallery

Biotrash talk

WHAT: Prof. Sarah
Hodges will host a lecture
on the contemporary
history of health care and
the afterlives of medical
garbage in Chennai, one of
the newest health hubs in
India.
WHO: Center for South
Asian Studies
WHEN: 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
WHERE: Tisch Hall, room
1029

Stress
workshop

WHAT: This workshop will
examine the cognitive and
emotional aspects of stress
and worry, and prescribe
evidence-based methods
for general wellness.
WHO: Mary A.
Rackham Institute
WHEN: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
WHERE: Rackham Graduate
School,Earl Lewis Room

ON THE DAILY

ALLISON FARRAND/Daily

Toledo resident Liu Hua leads protests on the Diag on Saturday
to protest the manslaughter conviction of Peter Liang, a former
NYPD officer who fatally shot Akai Gurley, a Black man, in
Brooklyn in 2014. Rallies in support of Liang occurred across the
country on Saturday. His supporters say that he has been made
a scapegoat for police brutality while other, often white, police
officers with similar cases have not been convicted.

Swiping right on

that potential suitor is
becoming more common
among American adults,
according to a new Pew
Research Center survey.

The national survey

of over two thousand
adults found about 15% of
American adults report
using online and/or mobile
dating sites, compared to
11% in early 2013.

A large part of this

spike in online dating is
connected to the increase
in dating apps like Tinder,
Bumble, Grindr and
Zoosk, especially with
high smartphone use
among young people.

This overall

increase is particularly
distinguishable in two
age groups: 18- to 24- year
olds and 55- to 64- year
olds.

In early 2013, only

about 10% of the first age
group reported having
used online dating; today,
the number has nearly
tripled to 27%.

The number of users is

growing across the range
of American adults. The
proportion of 55- to 64
year olds who use online
dating has doubled from
6% in 2013 to 12% in 2015.

The study also looked

into whether the outcome
of online dating sites is
the stereotypical one-
night-stand or if they truly
create relationships. 29%
of respondents reported
they know someone
who has married or
entered into a long-term
partnership with someone
they met via online dating.

The survey also said

college graduates and
users from middle-to-
high-income populations

are more likely to
know people who have
entered into a long-term
relationship that began
online. Nearly half of
the college graduates
know someone who has
entered into a long-term
partnership or marriage
with someone they met via
online dating.

Data also showed

digital dating has received
mostly positive reviews;
a majority of users agree
that it is advantageous
over other ways of meeting
potential partners.

80% said that online

dating is a good way to
meet people; more than
60% say that it allows
people to find a better
match and is much more
efficient and easier than
other means.

-DESIREE CHEW

Juried Art
Competition
reception

WHAT: The winners
of the Juried Art
Competition will
receive their awards and
showcase their work.
WHO: Center for
Campus Involvement
WHEN: 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan
League, Hussey Room

DELANEY RYAN/Dailly

Central Student Government president Cooper Charlton presents recent CSG initiatives at the University’s Board of
Regents meeting in the Michigan Union on November 19, 2015. (Delaney Ryan / DA)

CSG Detroit Congress looks at
transportation between cities

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