100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 2016 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

michigandaily.com
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Monday, February 22, 2016

ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE YEARS OF EDITORIAL FREEDOM

Michigan won the 2016 Big Ten
women’s swimming and diving title

» INSIDE

Making a splash

Researchers could
contribute to future
travels to the planet

By KEVIN LINDER

For the Daily

NASA recently funded a

University of Michigan design
for spacecraft thrusters as part
of its Next Space Technologies
for Exploration Partnerships
(NextSTEP). The NextSTEP
program encompasses various
projects, all aimed at bringing
humans closer to manned
missions to Mars.

The project at the University

is led by Aerospace Engineering
Prof. Alec Gallimore, who was
named the next Engineering
dean Thursday.

His design, called the X3,

is the thruster component of a
larger propulsion system called
the XR-100, which is the project
of major aerospace engineering
firm Aerojet Rocketdyne. NASA
awarded $6.5 million to Aerojet
Rocketdyne for the XR-100, $1
million of which has been given
for work on the X3 thruster

Noting current
events, speakers

emphasize impact on

citizens

By RACHEL COHEN

Daily Staff Reporter

On Friday, a group of panelists

from Flint, Detroit, Highland
Park and Muskegon Heights
spoke at the University to discuss
water access and management in

communities of color as part of an
event for Black Heritage Month.

Each panelist had a different

expertise
including
research,

science, political and activist
backgrounds. All of the panelists
agreed, however, that water is
a public good that should be
available for every person to
access.

Leon
Howard,
program

manager in the Office of Multi-
Ethnic
Student
Affairs
and

moderator of the event, said the
Office of Multi-Ethnic Student
Affairs wanted this event to

address concerns about water
access in communities of color and
to delve into why the management
of water has tremendous impacts
on communities.

“We wanted to do a panel

focused on water access and
management in communities of
color because of what was going
on in Flint and other places across
the state when it comes to being
able to access safe water,” he said.

One of the topics of the panel

was the ongoing effect of water
crises
as
well
as
long-term

Wolverines keep
intensity up all
week, hold off

Indiana for victory

By COLE ZINGAS

Daily Sports Writer

Saturday night, in a unified

leap, the Michigan women’s
swimmers,
divers,
coaches,

trainers,
and
the
Big
Ten

Championship trophy splashed
into
the
pool
at
Canham

Natatorium,
capping
off
a

victory years in the making.
Over the course of the four-
day Big Ten Championship
meet, the Wolverines beat out
the 12 other Big Ten teams and
claimed their first Big Ten title
since 2004.

“The only way to put that

in words is to cry for joy,” said
Michigan coach Mike Bottom.

The Wolverines dominated

the meet, leading from the
second
day
on.
After
the

100-yard freestyle, in which
freshman Siobhán Haughey set
a pool record with a time of 47.71

and senior captain Ali DeLoof
finished third, the meet was all
but over. And after the 200-yard
butterfly, with two events still
remaining, the Wolverines had
put themselves out of the reach
of second-place Indiana, the
only team within 400 points of
the Wolverines.

However,
DeLoof
didn’t

always know that Michigan
would accomplish this much.
Three years ago, DeLoof was a
freshman struggling through
weeks of 20 hours of practice
in the pool. It was Bottom’s first
year with the program, and the
team finished sixth in the Big
Ten. DeLoof helped the team
to improve over the next two
years — placing fifth in the Big
Ten in 2014 and third in 2015 —
but taking the next step was still
somewhere in the distance for
the Wolverines.

“We imagined it at the

beginning of the year, but it was
always just a possibility,” said
sophomore Clara Smiddy.

Even just a few days ago,

DeLoof — who was named first-
team All-Big Ten on Saturday
— didn’t know if she would be

Residents discuss
frustration with

government, burden

on families

By LARA MOEHLMAN

Daily Staff Reporter

As national media attention

and
a
state
and
federal

declarations of emergency over

Flint’s water crisis draw eyes to
the city’s community, residents
are tasked with continuing to
live within the city’s bounds,
feeling the crisis’ effects.

On
a
Friday
afternoon,

Saginaw Street — the city’s
main drag — is quiet, with
several residents walking into
the restaurants and shops that
have survived the economic
hardships that have plagued the
area since the closing of a nearby
General Motors plant almost

seventeen years ago.

On the University of Michigan-

Flint campus, a few students
linger in the Harding Mott
University Center watching T.V.
on communal screens, eating or
paging through thick textbooks.


Signs around campus tell

students the water is OK and safe
for them to drink. Students rely
on state-issued purifiers on each
faucet and drinking fountain to
protect them from any possible
lead in the city’s water supply

while on campus.

Cody Worswick, a sophomore

computer science major from
Marysville, Michigan considers
himself
fortunate.
Before

enrolling at the University’s
Flint campus, his mother was
aware of the dangerous water
quality within the city’s limits,
he said, and bought him a filter,
which he uses for all of his
drinking water.

Worswich said he doesn’t

After FOIA, body
has data but must
wait for University

approval

By JACKIE CHARNIGA

Daily News Editor

LSA senior Cooper Charlton,

Central Student Government
president, said Sunday that
course evaluation data could be
released for student use as early
as fall 2016.

The organization has gained

the data from a Freedom of
Information
Act
request,

Charlton said, but cannot release
it until it secures approval from
the Provost’s office.

CSG has been advocating for

the release of course evaluations
since Charlton’s party, Make
Michigan, took office this fall.
Charlton said two committees
led by Sean Pitt, LSA junior and
CSG chief of staff, and Anushka
Sarkar, LSA junior and CSG

chief programming officer, have
submitted reports to the office
of the Provost regarding the
construction of a new course
evaluation instrument and a
new release policy. If approved,
the University of Michigan will
release the course evaluation
data.

This is the first time CSG

has submitted a FOIA request
for course evaluations since
2011, according to Pitt. He
wrote in an e-mail that the
recommendations
formed

by the committees will be
considered by the University in
determining what information
will be collected and released
from course evaluations, and are
not directly related to the FOIA
request.

In
2011
and
prior,
the

Michigan
Student
Assembly,

now known as CSG, regularly
filed Freedom of Information
requests
to
release
course

evaluation data for a course
selection advice site. Pitt said
though these efforts have fallen

AMELIA CACCHIONE/Daily

Burton resident Raymond Blake speaks about how he has seen the effects of the water crisis firsthand as a volunteer for Catholic Charities at Flint on Friday.

AMELIA CACCHIONE/Daily

Terry Thompson, School of Public Health assistant professor, speaks about water access and communities of color
during a panel at Hatcher on Friday.

INDEX
Vol. CXXV, No. 78
©2016 The Michigan Daily
michigandaily.com

NEWS......................... 2A

OPINION.....................4A

CL A SSI FI EDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A

SUDOKU..................... 2A

A R T S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 A

SPORTS MONDAY........1B

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
Freshman Haughey guides M to title
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/SECTION/SPORTS

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 or e-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

WEATHER
TOMORROW

HI: 38

LO: 18

CSG makes
progress on
release of
course evals

In Flint, impacts of crisis
apparent in day-to-day life

Michigan wins
B1G title, ends
12-year drought

Panel looks at links between
race, access to clean water

‘U’ project
funded by
NASA for
Mars trip

ACADEMICS

SPORTS
RESEARCH

See EVALUATIONS, Page 2A
See FLINT, Page 3A

See NASA, Page 3A
See PANEL, Page 3A
See SWIMMING, Page 2B

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan