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May 06, 1917 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

£1 . !L.J £Yl1.,fA &AL..F.A A 1 £ 1ALd1

VEATHEB CANCELS STILL
ANOTHER BA SEALL GAE

COULD HAVE PLAYED ONLY TWO
OUT OF SIX COLLEGIATE \
CONTESTS
A combination of March weather
and a great enough quantity of rain
to render the use of boats more ef-
ficient than ordinary spikes proved
sufficient to banish any thought of a
baseball game yesterday.
Lundgren was anything but opti-
mistic. Too many contests have al-
ready been held up by the frigid
weather, and the spring drive of rain
clouds. Like Steve Farrell, the base-
ball coach is beginning to wonder if
the weather man is not slipping some-
thing over on him this spring.
Already enough games have been
called off to have made it a poor sea-
son for the schedule which came so
nearly to being started. Six games of
the season's total would have been
run off had the schedule been played.
Of these six,\four of them probably
could not have been played.
Yesterday's game will be played off
tomorrow. Parks, Glenn, or Lush are
the choices of Lundgren. One of thea
will be loaned to the freshmen to help
Ruzicka in his task of subduing the
Vrarsity.
NORTHWESTERN TAKES 5-1
GAME FROM INDIANA TEAI
Evanston, Ill., May 5.-Northwestern
won from Indiana on the home field,
5 to 1, and avenged the Hoosier vic-
tory at Bloomington. Crissman, the
Purple slab artist, held the visitors
to four hits and struck out fifteen men.
Indianasstarted the scoring in the
first inning, when Nelson counted on
' errors by Purple fielders. Thereafter
the Hoosiers were helpless. Wee Wil-
le's men bunched hits in the fifth and
seventh for five runs. Pattie Driscoll
got only one hit, a two bagger, but
Indiana strategy passed him on two
of his four trips to the plate. Nor-
man who follows Driscoll in the bat-
ting order, gathered two safe blows.
BEARDSTOWN WINS NINETEENTH
ILLINOIS PREP TRACK EVENT
Jacksonville, Ill., May 5.-In a sea
of mud and water Beardstown won
the nineteenth annual field and track
meet of the Western Illinois High
School league on Illinois field yester-
day with a total of 53 points. Jack-
sonville was second with 43, and
White Hall third with 13. Wright of
Beardstown and Hull of Jacksonville
were the stars. Wright won the 50,
100, and 220-yard dashes and finished
second in the high hurdles. Hull won
the 120 and 220 hurdles and the 440-
yard run.
May Rearrange Interclass Schelule
Almost a complete rearrangement of
the schedule for interclass baseball
will be made necessary on account of
the weather of the past week. Games
scheduled for Friday and yesterday
could not be played. No teams have
entered in addition to the 10 previously
announce. The schedule will be given
another start next week.
Noh Pitrhes One-Hit Ball Game

Thinking of What They .Iight
Have Done-the Reason 's Clear
Possibly we are overworking our Michigan has no Eddie Collins or
imagination. Possibly we are not. At Nap Lajoie on second, but for a sopho-
any rate it seems that Coach Lund- more, Dancer has proved capable of
working with Brandell. He can't run
gren, who handles Michigan's baseball- the bases as Bill Niemann can, but has
ers, should experience severe pain shown enough to be kept on the sack
every once i a while. all season in the face of strong com-
For let it he known to all who care petition.
to rea d that Micigan has a great base- Brandell has a happy faculty of tak-
hail tem th year--on paper at least. in; care of everything hit within a
Pn the loss of Morrie Dunne has left inle of him. When Bran is feeling

quite sn outit of sluggrs.
(Anring a lie l3ound Spillers
Looking over the list of hill men,
udgre ca't count all his capable
urlers on one hnd, using his thumb
in the lhargain. Miller and Robins.
the former parularly, had success-
ul seasons last year. Both were
,es and the latter had but lit-
le experience before entering the Un-
iversity. Nothing else except reason
ives the impession that bth would
Oae st ' o inreg rfashion
ihis spring.
But these are only two. Parks and
Glenn came up from the freshmen
with enviale records behind them.
Both have shown those records to be
earned. Lush has shown a world of
stuff, and a knowledge of pitching
technique. Saunders looks better
every time out. On an ordinary corps
of corner workers, he should be a star.
Then the coach has Ohlmacher.
The Man Behind the Willow
Behind the bat, Mattson has proved
a capable first string receiver since
Dunne left school. Haidler needs ex-
perience and is quiet, but is learning.
Smalley Morrison is a scrapper and a
comner. The graduation of Mattson will
give Morrison his big chance in 1918.
Both Birmingham and Newell are
first class men at corner number one.
jirmy has shown himself the better
hitter, but Newell is in a class alone
as a fielder. If there had been games
this ymar, Lundgren might have had to
si p la te in the morning to make up
for U at he lost during the night in
trying to figure the respective merits
of his first basemen.

right, the second and third basemen
don't overwork thetaselves. They don't,
have to. The hurler merely pitches
and grabs halls in front of him. The
left fielder don't play in very close
either. And on occasions, all pitchers
and pitching look alike to the cap-
tain.
Heinie Horwitz is a dangerous man
to wield the willow in a pinch. He
also is a handy man to have on the
bases. Horwitz plays third.
Suffice it to say that the outfield
contains three veterans - Niemann,
Reem, and Walterhouse. All three are
good hitters, and cover the ground in
bunches. Batsmen have to hit 'em
high and far to get a real clout. Coop-
er is a sub, capable of stepping in at
any time.
Looks Better Than 1914 Team
The team as it would have lined up
this year looks better than the one
which took down the championship
in 1914. Aside from Sisler the hurl-
ers seem better, and other depart-
ments are as a whole made up of
veterans and youngstersof ability.
Bran is the only shining genius in the
lot. The others are pluggers, the kind
that get better and show better every
time out. It is not too muclf to say
that the corps of moundsmen are easi-
ly the best that Michigan has ever
had.
The gang is not one of those that
hit 'em a mile on regular occasions.
They hardly need to when the flingers
make the opponents look like they
might as well be wielding tooth picks.
Do you wonder why Lundgren feels
those twinges at frequent intervals?

PLAY FiNALHOUND IN
-TENNISTOU MENT
EtGBERT .AND WESTBROOK DUEL
IN SINGLES FOR CHAM-
PIONSHIP
Finals in the spring tennis tourna-
ment in both singles and doubles will
be played tomorrow.
Egbert, semi-finalist in the fall
tourney will hook up with Westbrook
for the singles championship. In the
doubles, Egbert and Bartz will en-
gage Westbrook and Kelsey. The sin-
gles will begin at 2:30 o'clock, and
the other contest starts immediately
after the individual match is decided.
Close matches and fast play are
looked for in each struggle. The four
players rely principally upon a fast
driving game down the sidelines, a
good kind of play for spectators to
watch.
First struggles in the interclass
round-robin are to start tomorrow aft-
ernoon, following the completion of
the championships. Teams for the
class matches are now being chosen.
STUDENTS LEAVING MAY KEEP
IN TOUCH WITH UNIVERSITY
Union Wrectors Vote to Send Men
News of Ann Arbor Events
Each Week
Michigan students leaving the Uni-
versity to enter any branch of mili-
tary service, or to work upon farms,
will still be able to keep in touch with
Ann Arbor.
At the meeting of the board of di-
rectors of the Union yesterday it was
decided to send such men Michigan
song books, a weekly digest of Uni-
versity events, and news of other men
in government service. A resolution
was passed by the board thanking
those girls who have assisted the
Union in indexing letters for the in-
telligence bureau.
It was moved" and passed that the
King's Daughters be permitted to in-
stall a postage stamp machine in the
lobby of the club. All profits derived
from this will go to the organization,
which will use the funds for preven-
tion of tuberculosis and general char-
ity.
Not to Wear Robes at Commencement
Lawrence, Kan., May 5.-Putting
aside the pomp of previous &mmence-
ments, the faculty of the University
of Kansas will not appear in robes
at this year's ceremonies.
2,300 Michigan Training Volunteers
in a 36 in. picture. Special for Mon.,
Tues., and Wed., 50 cents. No orders
taken after 6 p. m. Wed. Carl Daines.
-Adv. 6

American League
W.
Boston ............10
Chicago .............11

New York ...........
St. Louis..........
Cleveland............
Detroit............
Athletics..........
Washington........

\How They Stand

8
9
9
6
6
6

National League
W.
New York............8
St. Louis ...........11
Chicago............11
Philadelphia......... 8
Cincinnati ...........11
Boston .............. 6
Brooklyn............4
Pittsburg............ 7

7
8
10
9
9
10
L.
5
7
9
7
11
7
7
13

L.
4
8

Pct.
.714
.579
.533
.529
.474
.400
.400
.375
Pct.
.615
.611
.550
.533
.500
.462
.364
.350

YESTERDAY'S GAMES
American League
St. Louis.................1
Chicago..................0
Other games postponed.

5
1

1
2

National League
Cincinnati ...................7 10
jChicago ........ ...........4 8

0
2

Other games postponed.
Equip Boathouse to Train Students
New Haven, Conn., May 5.-The
Yale boathouse is being equipped to
train students for the naval coast de-
fense reserve. When the work is com-
pleted 200 more men can be called out.
Naval Reserves to Receive Colors
Colors will be presented to the
Seventh and Eighth divisions of the
Michigan naval reserve by Mrs. J. T.
Brodhead and Mrs. Humphrey Grylls
of Detroit. Willis Brodhead, '17E, and
Humphrey M. K. Grylls, '17E, are en-
rolled with the reserve.
ONE DOLLAR
SUNDAY DINNER
12:34 to 2:30
Cream of Celery Soup
Relishes
Braised Shoulder of Veal
Roast Leg of Lamb
Baked Trout
Mashed Potatoes Green Peas
Lettuce Salad
Apple Pie, Cheese
Fruit Sherbet
Ice Cream, Cake
Tea Coffee Milk
The Renellen Hospice
A Place of Distinctive Service
337 E. LIBERTY ST.

RE 'Y UT JUIFIED
T k
I E)ERA L LT XA)E COMMiSSION
FJI)S SUPiLY IS A1)E-
QUA TE
Waington, May 5.-Prevailing re-
tail prices of anthracite coal are un-
waranted and the supply for next
season is aequate, the federal trade
in.a
coimission stated today in a prelim-
inary report based on a partially com-
pletod investigation ordered by con-
gres s last winter.
The conmmission warns consumers
against buying larger quantities of
coal than usual this summer, saying
there are symptoms now of such a
buying panic as that which enabled
speculatos last winter to force prices
above normal. No good reason exists,
says the report, why May prices should
not be subject to the usual summer
discount, but "if the public is again so
deceived as to indulge in a scramble
for coal, the favorable sitit'on may
e nullified ."

St. Louis, May 5.-Ernie Koob,
fo~merKaamaoo ouhpa ad eel May Mfeasures rshmnen Tomorrow
lege rival of Sisler, today hurled the Dr. George A. May will start remeas-
Browns to a 1-0 victory over Row- uring freshmen tomorrow. His hours
land's White Sox sluggers. Koob al- are from 10 to 12 and from 2 to 4
lowed but one hit. o'clock in Waterman gymnasium.

VILLANOVA BLANKED
Peinsy Hitters Slam in.Three Runs to
Opponents' Zero
Philadelphia, May 5.-Pennsylvania,
after a six-inning scoreless battle, fell
on the flinging of Vincent Molyneaux
of Villanova at Franklin field today
and three runs came whizzing over the
plate in the seventh chapter. The
final score was: Pennsylvania, 3; Vil-
lanova, 0. Ad Swigler pitched a good
game for the Quakers and his fielding
was remarkable. He covered all the
infield in front of him and twice
blighted developing attacks by Villa-
nova. Molyneaux was in great form
and only two hits were made off his
work until Pennsylvania broke the ice
in the seventh.
Ward Hinkson acted as captain of
the Quaker nine in the absence of
Howard Berry. He made a circus
catch of a fly from Dougherty's bat
in the first inning, robbing the batter
of at least a double. Pennsylvania
had a chance to score in the first in-
ning, but Jimmy Todd, who was on
third base, was fooled by Molyneaux's
pitching motion. Todd started for the
plate and was nipped as he dived for
the 'rubber. Johnny White followed
this by singling to center.
Pennsylvania.......0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 *-3
Villanova..........000Q00000-0
Canadian Tennis Champion Killed
Victoria, B. C., May 5.-Bobbie
Powell, tennis singles champion of
British- Columbia for several years,
was killed in action in France on
April 28, accordirfg to word received
here today. Powell was an attorney
and was private secretary to the lieu-
tenant governor of British Columbia
from 1900 to 1904. He founded the
North Pacific Lawn Tennis associa-
tion in 1904. The following year he
won the tennis championship of Scot-
land.
In 1908 Powell was the captain of
the Canadian tennis team which com-
peted in the Olympic games in Eng-
land and represented Canada in the
Davis cup games in Chicago in 1912.
Powell enlisted in the Forty-eighth
Canadian battalion at the outbreak of
the war, was appointed lieutenant, and
went overseas with that body.
G. C. Grismore and Mae White Engaged
Announcement has been made of
the engagement of Grover C. Gris-
mere of the Law school faculty, to
Miss Mae A. White, '13, M. A. '17, of
Detroit. Miss White was formerly a
teacher in the Battle Creek high
school.
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
St. tI

Hartnell

601 E. W llam $t.

BETSY ROSS SHOP
Now located conveniently in
NICKELS ARCADE

Candies

Sodas

Ice Cream

(Fountain service after May 15th)

E
i
a

H

Developing 1Oc

Printing 3c to 5c

IrA

When You See
'the~~r

Think of Curtains, made to measure,
best materials used, and satisfaco10
guaranteed.
PILBEAM & MARZ CO.

8 Hlour Service
KODAK FINISHING
and Enlarging
Films left before 9 A. M., ready same day at 5 P. M.
Films left before 7 P. M. ready next day at NOON. Print
orders left before NOON, ready same day at 5 P. M.
SPECIAL PRICES ON DEVELOPING 6 OR MORE
FILMS or PRINTING 50 or more pictures.
EASTMAN KODAKS, FILMS AND SUPPLIES
RESULTS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. GIVE
US ONE TRIAL AND BE CONVINCED
Arcade Floral Shop

720 Peter Smith
Bldg.
Detroit, Mich,

31 No. Main Street
Ann Arbor, Mh
Phone 2380

6404 Utica Ave.
Cleveland, Ohio

KODAKS
Phone 600

FLORISTS

Cor. Arcade and Maynard

Tees the HiohRevt 'lunit.,

GROUPS

-, _____ . r ' __ '

ll

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