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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE

ITCHIGAN DAILY

Jie Largest Assortment
fine woolens in the city is here for your inspection. We think you'll
ree that never have you seen classier fabrics. Tailored in our in-
itable style in a suit to your measure, they will make you as smartly
essed as any man in town.

G. H. Wild Company

ng Merchant Tailors

STATE STREET

Lee's .Slotted Throat
TENNIS RACKETS
rho Slater Book Shop
tone 430 336 S. State St.

Bicycles

Switzers'
Hardware

Racketr

Bicycle
Repairing
Hey Fitting
Razor Blade
Sharpening

Base Ball
Goods

awn Mowers

310 State
Only Hardware
Near Campus

i

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

06 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

-. A

We Offer You
CURITY - - SERVICE -- LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo,ooo
Inn Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1864
ain Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huroa
anch Office--
7o7 North University Ave.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars rn on astern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limitea ano axpress Cars-7:35a .
i., 8:xo a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. M., 9:1e
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m and
every two hours to- 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
3:41 pn.-
Jackson Express Cara -( Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. mn. and every; ,two hours
Local Cars ,Mastbound-:35 a. ni, 6:40 a
m. q:eg a. m. and every two hours to 7:os p.
M.. S:e p. in., 9:o5 p. n., 10:50 p. m. to
Y silanti only, 9:20 a. Mn., 9:50 a. Mn., 2:05 p
m., 6:,5 p. m., 11:45 p. m., ix:xo a..m., i:2c
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6 :osa. m., j :S9 a.
M., xe:2e p. M.. 1a:20a. M.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mv."gan. Published every morning except
Mjnday during the university year.
Entered atatheepost-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
()thce: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2.;.; by mail, $s.0e..
Want ad. stations: duarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Pakar.
Phones: Business, 96; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed "o words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are colected at 7:3 o'clock eacz
evening.
John C. B. Parker...,......Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn ...................ity Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald..........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson.... Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson... ..........Women's Editor
Leonard W. Nieter.....Ass't Telegraph Editor
DeForrest S. Rood..........Exchange Editor
Cam bell...Assistant Business Manager
Albert :. Hrn.. Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
C. M. Jicking H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney J. L. Stadeker
L. S. Thompson E. L. Zeigler
Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schermerhorn, Jr.
R. H. Fricken G. O. Brophy
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R. . McDonald
K. L. Wehmeyer Eugene Given
P. W. Gordon Helmuth Maag
E. L. Rice C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
Walter R. Payne Bernard Wvohl
WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1917.
Night Editor-G. 0. Brophy.
UNIVERSITY ALUMNI REUNION
DAY
More than 150 members of the alum-
ni body will spend today in Ann Arbor,
revisiting the scenes of former days,
watching the faces on the campus,
picking up the threads of college life
anew. They are here for the first
University Alumni reunion day.
The idea of such an event has come
from the east. Michigan is the first
of the big western colleges to adopt
what has developed into a tremend-
ous success along the Atlantic sea-
board. We give this innovation our
unqualified support. We hope the
seed planted today may grow with the
coming years until its branches stretch
wherever Michigan alumni are locat-
ed.
To tell just what Michigan is doing,
is the aim of the list of speeches ar-
ranged for the day. In such a gath-
ering there is a wealth of opportunity
for binding the alumni even closer
to the University. We predict that
this opportunity will be so fully ap-
preciated that the time will come
when University alumni reunion day
will be a date toward which the three
great branches of university life-
faculty, undergraduates, and alumni-
will look forward. It will be a time
for the renewal of old ties, the cement-
ing of friendships, and unification of
the view of the goal toward which the
University aims.
THE MAY FESTIVAL OPPOR-
TUNITY
When Loiuse Homer appeatrs on
the platform of Hill auditorium this
evening, the twenty-fourth May Fes-
tival begins. For the next four days
music will reign supreme among the
admirers flocked to Ann Arbor. To
our visitors we give a welcome; and
more than a welcome, we offer an

opportunity.
To the May Festival guests is afford-
ed a chance to see the University ser-
iously at work. Where many people
veiw Michigan only at gala times,
such as the big football game, the peo-
ple who gather here in early May
see the educational wheels grinding
out the gist of learning.
We hope the guests will profit by
the opportunity and carry away - an
impression of Michigan as it really is.
PAY YOUR CLASS DUES
Since a day long before the pres-
ent student can remember, classes
have allowed their due paying scheme
to lie in the rut. The idea of allow-
ing no senior to receive his diploma
until he paid class dues was a step
in the right direction. Since then the
old haphazard system-rather lack of
system-has continued to prevail.
A movement was started on the
campus yesterday to bring another,
more far reaching idea into play. All
literary classes are appealing to their
members to settle their dues to date,
owing to the present unsettled condi-
tions.
In the face of the fact that classes
have expenses during the four years
of college, the vast majority of stu-
dents wait until graduation looms be-
fore giving any thought to class dues.
Serious consideration is being given

toward devolving a campus "pay dues"
days. It should receive support.
In the interim, pay your class dues
today.
This section ofthe country seems to
be imbibed with the spirit of pota-
triotism.
France presented the United States
with the Statue of Liberty, Germany
with th.e statue of Frederick the Great.
Michigan is going to have an ambu-
lance unit after all. Are you sailing
June 2?
Have you stopped to think that Ann
Arbor will be dry one year from to-
day?
EXPERIENCED TEACHES
DESIRED IN YUCATN
MEXICAN GRADUATES OF AMERI-
CAN UNIVERSITIES TO BE
GIVEN PREFERENCE
Yucatan, Mexico, is appealing to the
United States for experienced teach-
ers from our standard universities,
colleges, and normal schools to carty
on its educational work, according to
Dr. Gregorio Torres Quintero, head
of the the educational department of
that country.
Mexican graduates of American uni-
versities will be shown preference for
these positions, with Europeans of
Latin origin second choice. All appli-
cants must have a thorough knowl-
edge of Spanish, as the teaching will
be done entirely in that language.
Successful applicants for these posi-
tions will take charge of the industrial
training, agricultural training, house-
hold arts training, commercial, high,
normal, elementary, kindergarten, and
continuation schools in Yucatan.
Any who are interested in this work
are requested to call at the office of
the committee on appointments in
room 102 Tappan hall, between the
hours of 1:30 and 3 o'clock, excepting
on Saturday.
1ntercolegtate
Yale: A summer camp for Yale
men under the required reserve of-
ficers' age is being urged by Professor
McCabe, who is in charge of a battery
of the training corps. The men would
be ready in a short time to take com-
missions in the army and navy and so
should be trained, according to the
professor.
Illinois: Seventy-five students with-
drew from the University of Illinois
in one day to enter the reserve officers'
training camp at Fort Sheridan. The
number leaving is increased daily.
Indiana: An aero science club has
been organized to study bomb throw-
ing, aerial photography, wireless teleg-
raphy, the gyroscope, and engines.
The members will probably enroll in
the government aerial corps if needed.
Washington: tuns have been is-
sued to the faculty training squad and
the manual of arms will be taken up
immediately. Fifty instructors are en-
rolled in the corps and it is the
"crack" company of the university.
Princeton: Friends of the univer-
sity have presented the president with
a sum of money to be apportioned

among the faculty men whose salaries
are below $3,000. The financial crisis
expected will be the cause of want,
according to the doners' ideas.
Utah: One hundred and eleven stu-
dents have left the university to work
on fares since the announcement that
credit will be given to those answer-
ing the government's call.
COMMITTEE ON APPOINTMENTS
FILL 14 TEACHING POSITIONS
The committee on appointments
which is placing teachers for the com-
ing school year, has announced the
following appointments: Mildred A.
Hatch, '17, Northville, Mich., language
department; Dona C Boyle, '17, Har-
bor Springs, Mich., English depart-
ment; Theodore P. Bishop, '20M, Wa-
tertown, S. D., science department;
Mrs. Lyda H. Johnson, '14, Highland
Park, Mich., French department;
Harry E. Mutchler, '17, Royal Oak,
Mich., principal; Elna H. Nelson, '17,
Highland Park, Mich., history depart-
ient; James W. Hoge, '17, Marine
City, Mich.,- mathematics department;
William G. Towle, '17, Dryden, Mich.,
superintendent; Evangeline L. Brad-
ley, Coldwater, Mich., biology and gen-
eral science departments; Ethel Vail,
'17, Birmingham, Mich., history depart-

g¢p '
n 7'
:

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - EFFICIENCY
enlent and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
eased With Our Service. Two Offices
105 . Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
Ia typewriter from
. D. MORRILL
322 South State Street
will furnish you an Instruction
k free of oharge. You will be a
it beore you know it.
PLAI N
lOP SUEY 30c
FRIED RICE, (plain), 25c
At All Times
t
Everyday have Fresh Home-
:ade Hot Rolls served here-2
olls and Butter-5c.
Open 11 A.M. to 1 A.M.
:higan Ian 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 948-R
women

Take your Amateur Finishing
TO

Rube L

G ,t oar Rceve tioli Oxt of
yT,- ED Lb OLF
Our Stocki Is comzipleto anidi
Prices oRwgh
*}a
VNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
11 ilililfililllliilllitf i!111111111|!1111111111||illitillilifilili A

wain
Twenty-two remarkable photo-
graphs of the Greek Play. Come
in and see them.
713 E. VNIVERSITY
IR Alarm Clocks
S RF $1.00 up
Fountain Pens-
Waterman and Conklin
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MODERN BARB SHOP
332 State St.
A Particular Place
for Particular People.
FRANK C BOLCH, Prop,
MICHIGAN WOMEN MAY COMPETE
FOR ELLEN RICHARDS PRIZE
Thesis Must be Based Upon Research
In Biological, Chemical, or
Physical Science
Michigan women interested in la-
boratory research may compete for
the Ellen Richards research prize of
$1,000.
The thesis must embody new observ-
ations and conclusions based on inde-
pendent laboratory research in bio-
logical, chemical, or physical science.
Papers published before 1916, or thesis
presented for a degree are ineligible.
Articles presented for competition
must be in the hands of Dr. Lillian
Welsh, Goucher college, Baltimore,
Md., before Feb. 28, 1918. The title
page of each manuscript must bear
an assumed name, and the writer must
send with it, a sealed envelope con-
taining her application blank super-
scribed with her own name.'
I can duplicate any lens. J. L.
Chapman, Optrometrist and Jeweler,

Sanitary
Dry Ci eanlng Co.
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
Suits
Made to Measure
$15 and up
Phone 2225
UNION BUREAU FILES
9,00 'INDEX CARDS
20,000 Hae Been eeeeied by Com-
R1ittee; 3ore Help
Needed x
About 20,000 index cards have been
received by the intelligence bureau at
the Michigan Union but only 9000 of
these have been filed to date.
More girls and men are needed to
aid in the work of filing although
there has been a crew who have re-
ported regularly for duty. The girls'
work in the atternoon has been under
the direction of Helen B. Bates, '18,
while Glenn Coulter, '18L, and Abra-
ham S. Hart, '17, have had charge of
the men's work in the evening.
Following is the list of girls who
have been working regularly: Gert-
rude Brock, '18, chairman; Catherine
Connell, '18, Hope Ferguson, '19, Alice
Worcester, '19, Lucile Duff '19, Ruth
Ely, '19, Hazel Selby, 18, Alice Leon-
ard, '20, Alice Burtless, '18, Ruth
Butler '17, Margaret Walsh, '19, Helen
Hughes, '19 Mary Thomson, '19, and
Dorothy Durfee., '19.
hOME NURSERY CL ASSES IN
CAIIRWE OF JIELEN SELILMAN, 10
Courses of 15 Lessons Each; Maximut
Cost, $5.00; Announce
Schedule
Classes in home nursing which be-
gan this week are n charge of Helen
Sellman, '06, former assistant superin-
tendent of the Saginaw general hos-
pital, who has just come from private
duty in Ypsilanti.
Two three-hour and five two-hour
courses of 15 lessons each are offered
and the maximum cost will be $5.00.
The classes meet at the city Y. W. C.
A. rooms and as more than 100 have
already registered for them few places
are left.
The schedule of classes follows:
9-10:30 Monday and Friday; 9-10:30
Tuesday and Thursday; 10:30-12 Mon--
day and Friday; 10:30-12 Tuesay and
Thursday; 2-3:30 Tuesday and Thurs-
day; 4-5:30 Tuesday and Thursday,
and 9-10:30 Saturday; 7:30-9 Tuesday
and Thursday, and 10:30-12 Saturday.
Y. M. C. A. Eletiton to be Held Today
Votes for the election of Y. M. C A.
officers for the year of 1917-18 will be
received in Lane hall and at the west
corner of the Library where abllot
boxes will be placed from 8 o'clock
to 7 o'clock today.
Ballot cards have been sent out to
all members and the bax at Lane hall
already contains a number of them.
All members of the organization are
urgently requested to cast their votes.
Rugs perfectly cleaned, washed, and
sized without injury. Koch & Henne. ft
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Paekard Academy. tU

ES

..

WE GU ARANTEE
$300.00
to college students for a full
summer's work. For full infor-
mation write
TE NATIONAL )JAP CO.
Indianapolis, Indlana

Bathing Caps
40c &, 50c
at
fJUARRY DRUG COI'S.
Prescription Store
Cor. S'ate & N. University

I:

Penny Wise
andaq
Pound Foolish
Our customers figure
their shoe bills by
the year and not by
the pair.
As a result, they ex-
perience economy-
plus style, comfort,
and distinctive de-
signs in footwear.
Footwear for . .
Men and Women.
A. J. UBY
INC.
NICKELS
ARCADE
PHONE 795-J
PROSPECTIVE PROFESSIONAL
STUDENTS MIUST APPLY SOON
Applications to pursue the combined
lit-medic, lit-law, and lit-dent cur-
ricula must be in the hands of the
registrar by May 15, or they will not
be given consideration. Up to date
but 12 applications have been, handed
to Registrar Arthur G. Hall, whereas
there are usually 100 presented to him
by this time. The rule that these ap-
plications must be presented by May
15 will be strictly adhered to this year,
the registrar says.

'. W. C. A. cabinet meets at 4:15
lock today at Newberry hall.
'irst rounds in the tennis tourna-
nt should be completed by tonight.
unor and senior baseball squads
. practice today and tomorrow.
arn and needles for the knitting
sses can be purchased at the office
he director in Barbour gymnasium.
.rcade tickets and money must be
ned in by members of the Girls'
e club to Grace Raynsford, '18, at
Library before 9 o'clock this morn-
Wt-of-town visitors attending the
y Festival are invited to use the
t rooms and parlors of the Martha
k building any afternoon between
ad 5:30 o'clock.
unior Engineers pay class dues. in
gineering Society rooms today from
12.-Adv. 2
atronize Daily Advertisers.

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