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May 02, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
COLD AND CLOUDY
TODAY

y tr. tAgan

jDatt

UNITED PRESS
DAY AD NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVIL No. 148.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 2, 1917.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

f

LOUISE HOMER .TO
OPEN -FESTIVAL AT
CONCERTTONIGHT
METROPOLITAN STAR WILL BE
SOLOIST ON INITIAL
PROGRAM
CHICAGO SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA PLAYS
Arthur Middleton Will Take Place of
Hinshaw Saturday
Evening
Mme. Louise Homer, contralto of the
Metropolitanm Opera company, will be
the soloist at the opening concert of
the May Festival at 8 o'clock this
evening in Hill auditorium. This ac-
complished artist, who has become a
favorite in this city, will be heard in
four arias by Gluck, Handel, Meyer-
beer, and Verdi.
The other numbers on the program
will consist of orchestral works played
by the Chicago Symphony orchestra of
70 ;,en, conducted by Frederick Stock,

MICIIIGAMUA TAKES
WHITES INTO CAMP
IN ANNUAL ROUNDUP
When from out the paleface wigwam
From behind the staring moon-face
Comes the slow and solemn six strokes
Telling that the Evening Spirit
Wanders over the woods and meadows
Lights the campfires o the heavens
Then the Michigamua warriors
In their feathers and their war paint
Soon will gather round the oak tree
Round the oak tree called the Tappan
There to greet the trembling paleface
Twelve in number wait the bidding
Of the loud rejoicing redskins
For before they take the long trail
To the lodge of Michigamua
Many trials and many tortures
First must show their strength and
courage
Ere the red man bids them welcome
Ere he calls each paleface "brother"
Ere the peace-pipe smoke together.
EXAMINE MEN WITHOUT
APPLYING TO CHICAGO

PHI BETA KAPPA
CHOO-SES 22 MEN
AND 25 WOMEN
RECORD NUMBER OF SENIORS IS
NAMED IN 1917 ELEC.
TION

ANN ARBOR CLAIMS 13
OUT OF TOTAL OF

471

CANDIDATES REPORT
AT WATERMAN
NASIUM

TO BOARD
GYM-

MME. LOUISE HOMER

Candidates for officers' training
camps can report to the examing board
in Waterman gymnasium without
sending in their applications to Chi-
ca go. This information was given out
by Major Charles W. Castle yesterday
and is according to directions received
by him from the central department
headquarters.
With these new directions on hand
the applicants make out their blanks
in accordance with orders, and report
to Captain J. F. Breakey, 213 East
Huron street, for physical examina-
tion. Those who are accepted can
then report to the examining board at
Waterman gymnasium. Final notifica-
tions regarding the result in each case
will be sent to the applicant by the
commanding officer of the training
camp concerned. The plan is for can-
didates to report at the camps be-
tween May 8 and 14. Men should not
proceed to camp until notified.
The general impression that the of-
ficers' reserve corps is full is contrary
to a telegram received by Mr. Gard-
ner S. Williams from B. F. Gilkeson,
executive secretary of the training
camps association. The telegram
stat that large numbers of well
qualified men will still be accepted
by the camps, but should get their ap-
plications in immediately.

and include Dvorak's Overture
"Othello," Brahms' Symphony No. 3,
F major, Opus 90, "A Dance Rhap-
sody," by Delius, and ,the symphonic
poem, "Finlandia," by Sibelius.
New Addition to List
Another prominent artist has been
added to the list of soloists in the per-
son of Arthur Middleton, bass-bari-
tone, of the Metropolitan Opera com-
pany, who has been engaged to- sing
at th'e Saturday evening concert in
place of Hinshaw, who is unable to be
present owing to illness.
Mr. Middleton, besides being a suc-
cessful operatic singer, is one of the
best known concert and oratorio sing-
ers in America. His operatic reper-
tory includes most of the operas which
are being presented at the present
time. The very fact that he is to
reach Ann Arbor from Kansas City
shortly before the concert Saturday
evening, and will sing the role as-
signed to him without rehearsal,
speaks well for the training and mu-
sical equipment' of this young Ameri-
can singer. This will be Mr. Middle-
ton's first appearance in Ann Arbor.
Wombs Dropped
On Neutral Village
Dutch City, Zierikzee, Laid in Ituins
by Big Aeroplane
Raid
Amsterdam, May 1.-The Dutch vil-
lage of - Zierikzee, near the Belgian
frontier, was laid to utter waste Sun-
day night, by, bombs droppel from an
aeroplane. The aviators nationality
and his reason for dropping bombs
on a neutral unprotected city have
not been established.
There were several casualities, five
according to one report. "The whole
village is in ruins," declared the Tele-
graaf today. The Telegraaf joined with
other Dutch papers in demanding an
immediate inquiry to establish the
identity of the raiding party. Nearly
all newspapers insist, from the loca-
tion of the city, it is evident the bombs
were not dropped by mistake, but rath-
er by design.
. Toastmasters to Give Farwell Banquet
In honor of John C. B. Parker, '17,
and Harold A. Fitzgerald, '17, who
leave for Fort Sheridan in the near
future, Toastmasters will hold a fare-
well banquet Friday evening . at the

Honored Students Selected from 654
Possibilities by
Society
Forty-seven members of the senior
class, the largest number in the his-
tory of the local chapter, were elected
to Phi Beta Kappa, the literary honor
society, at a meeting of the members
held yesterday afternoon. Twenty-five
of those elected are women and 22
men.
There were 654 considered for elec-
tion this year while last year 36 were
chosen out of 521 considerations, 23
men and 13 women. Ann Arbor leads
the cities represented with 13 of the
newly elected members claiming her
as home. Four are from Detroit and
three from Grand Rapids and Toledo
respectively.
Following is the list of those elect-
ed:
William T. Adams, Ann Arbor;
┬░Yancy R. Altsheler, Louisville, Ky.;
Jeanette Armstrong, Ann Arbor; Leav-
itt J. Bulkley, Detroit; Ruth Butler,
Frankfort; Lillian Carnegie, Detroit;
Ralph M. Carson, Ann Arbor; Helen
L. Champion, Detroit;- Jean Paul
Cooley, Erie, Pa.; Marie Cronwell, Ann
Arbor; Adele L. Crandall, Ann Ar-
bor; Cecil F. Cross, Wayne; Stanley
L. Fildew, Pontiac; Irma Hazel Gid-
dings, Lawton; Mildred A. Hatch, Ann
Arbor; Margaret Henkel, Mt. Clem-
ens; Rollin C. Hunter, South Lyon;
Philip M. Hoff, Honesdale, Pa.; Harold
M. Johnston, Hillsdale; Anita M.
Kelley, Kenwood, N. Y.; Bernice K.
Krueger, Toledo, O.; Helen L. Krueger,
Toledo, 0.; Howard S. Liddell, Erie,
Pa.; Albertine G. Loomis, Grand Rap-
ids; Alva J. McAndless, Capac; La-
vinia G. McBride, Ann Arbor; James
W. Mack, Gary, Ind.; Francis F. Nes-
bit, Washington, D. C.; Helen Pratt,
Chelsea; Josephine H. Randall, Ann
Arbor; Margaret R. Reynolds, Ann
Arbor; Harold W. Rosenheim, Detroit;
Irene F. Russell, Ann Arbor; Claude
W. Schutter, Ann Arbor; Harold J.
Sherman, Toledo, O.; Olga E. Shink-
man, Grand Rapids; Paul E. Steketee,
Grand Rapids; Amanda Streeper,
Wayne, Pa.; Harold B. Teegarden,
Greenville, 0.; Ethel Vail, La Porte,
Ind.; Harriett K. Walker, Ann Ar-
bor; A. Philip Warriner, Fort Wayne,
Ind.; Lester A. Waterbury, Chicago;
Frances A. Way, Battle Creek; Ingle
B. Whinery, Grand Rapids; Alice Y.
Wieber, Houghton, and Annetta L.
Wood, Ann Arbor.
The reception and initiation for the
newly elected members Will be held
at 8 o'clock Friday evening, May 11,
in Barbour gymnasium. Dean James
R. Angell of the University of Chicago,
son of President Emeritus James Bur-
rill Angell, will give the address of the
evening.
RUSSIANS CELEBRATE ENTRY
OF U. S. INTO WORLD WAR
Petrograd, May 1.-Sixty thousand
siancitizens massed in a great
Ia day parade today marched past
the American embassy' to cheer the
entry of the United States -into the'
world war. The president of the Duna,
Robzinko, spoke from a balcony stand-
ing beside American Ambassador
Francis, eulogizing America's human-
itarian course.
"The liberation of Russia must b
crowned with victory for humanity,"
declared Ambassador Francis in a
brief reply. The demonstration was
planned especially to show that the
anti-American movement engineered
a week ago by a sociolist agitator did
not represent the sentiment of the
Russian people.
Iowa Furnishes Bowlegged Soldiers

Iowa City, Ia., May 1.---Iowa can
furnish a goodly contribution to the
army, says the doctor in charge of
the gymnasium. Most of the men ex-
amined are in excellent physical con-
dition, although bowleggedness is an,
affliction from which many suffer.

Drastic Changes
Follow Crusade
Lord Northliffe's Naval Agitation
Assures Reorganization
Shortly
London, May 1.-Rumors that the
powerful agitation lead by L No rth-
cliffe to force the British admiralty to
tell the truth of the submarine men-
ace have born fruit in "drastic
changes" shortly to be made in that
office, were featured by London pa-
pers today.
In the meantime Northcliffe, through
his Daily Mail. hammered away vigor-
ously, demanding that the government
tell all the facts of losses by subma-
rines in order that the British peo-
ple might realize the necessity for
Economy.
STUDENTS PLAN TO FORM
AMBULANE CORPS SOON
SUFFICIENT MEN HAVE ALREADY
SIGNED TO MAKE PLAN A
SUCCESS
If the plans of a group of students
on the campus carry through, Mich-
igan is to have an ambulance corps In
France within two months. When the
proposition was brought before Pres-
ident Harry B. Hutchins, he stated
that if a petition bearing the names
of 25 qualified students was submitted,
there would be reasonable grounds for
supposing that the unit would be ac-
cepted as officially representing Mich-
igan.
It will be absolutely necessary, how-
ever, that every student have definite
permission from home, and be in
proper physical condition to go.
Twenty-one men have already signed
up and several more are ready to go,
but are undecided du, to their having
to wait for permission from home and.
to other requirements. The committee
is working steadily to put the project
through and declares the prospects of
success to be very bright.
$10,000 Must be Raised
Providing the plan is carried out,
it will first be necessary to raise $10,-
000 to finance the 25 men. This sum
will probably be met by subscription
from alumni. The next step will be'
the securing of papers of recommeda-
tion and other information which will
be sent on to Boston and Washington
in order to obtain passports for the
men.
"The movement is thoroughly Am-
erican," said Ralph Starrett, who is
one of the leaders of the project, "and
the corps will be a part of the Ameri-
can ambulance field service. The men
are working fast, and hope to be able
to leave June 2." The men would
probably sail for Bordeaux which is
the route of most boats now sailing'
for France.
New Unit May be Formed
There is already a waiting list of
students who have expressed a desire
to go, and if enough interest is mani-
fested another unit may be formed,
Units have already been formed at sev-
eral other universities. Dartmouth,
Leleand Stanford, Harvard, and
Princeton have each three ambulance
corps in the field. Tufts college is
forming a corps and will probably
sail with the unitefrom Michigan. A
meeting will be held at 7 o'clock to-
night in Lane hall, and all those who'
are going are urged to attend.
The following have already express-'
ed their intention of going: A. R.
Thompson, grad., James- E,.. Chenot,'

'19L, C. 0. Wilson, '20E, Ward Starrett,
'20E, Glen A. Wilt, Ronald Hoskin, '20,
l; T., Fletcher, '20, Harry D. Wood,
'19, E. D. Slater, '17, Guyor W. Os-
good, '20, A. D. Rathbone, '19, George
R. Larwill, '20, Kenneth Wesley, '17,!
Thomas McAllister, '18, Perrin H.
Long, G. W. Lovell, '18, Allan J. Fox,
'19, L. S. Thompson, '18, R. W. Phelps,
'20E, Roy D. Lamond, '17, and Harold
,A.Day, '20E.
TICKETS FOR UNION SPRING
PARTY FRIDAY NOW ON SALE
tickets for the spring' party to be
held at the Unioq Friday evening, have
been placed on sale. Plans are being
made for a gala occasion, and the dec-
orations and' programs will be in
Michigan colors.
Mr. and Mrs. 0. W. Boston and oth-
ers to be announced later will be the
chaperones. The tickets sell for $1.00;
and are on sale at the Union.

PUT SEIZED GERMAN
SHIPS INTO SERVICE
Will Carry Food and Provisions to Al-
lies; May Bring Teuton
Prisoners Across
Washington, May 1.-Seized German
ships will be immediately put into
service to carry food and provisions to
America's allies, it was announced by
the shipping board today.
Two of the vessels seized at the
declaration of war are now repaired
and ready for service. Others will be
ready for service within a week. The
steamer Clara Menning, taken at New
York, was today enroute for Baltimore:
under orders of the shipping board,
where she will be loaded with wheat
and coal for Italy. She will sail under
charter as soon as loaded.
The German Tisa also seized in New
York harbor will ship with a cargo for
France under charter to the French
government. If either is torpedoed
Germany will be sinking her own
property.
Suggestions that German prisoners
of war in France and England be
brought to America as the ships re-
turn are being received by administra-
tion officials. They could be easily
fed in this country, it is pointed out,
and could be put to work here as well
as insuring the safety of the vessels
in the submarine zone.
Orator Leaves For
Twin City Today
R. M. Carson,'17 to Compete in North-
ern Oratorical League
Contest
Ralph M. Carson, '17, and Harold B.
Teegarden, '17, will leave tonight for
Minneapolis, where Carson will de-
liver his oration "The Scholar and the
Socialist" in the annual Northern Ora-
torical league contest. Teegarden will
go as secretary of the Northern Ora-
torical league.
Carson won the University contest
and the annual memorial of $100 of-
fered by Nathan M. Kaufman. He will
contest against the orators of Minne-
sota, Northwestern, Oberlin, Wiscon-
sin, Iowa, and Illinois for first honors
and a prize of $100. The contest will
be held in Ann Arbor next year, a
constitutional provision governing the
location of the holding of the contest.
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, because
of his illness, is unable to attend the
contest this year. Prof. R. D. T. Hol-
lister of the oratory department will
go as his substitute.
ALUMNI GUESTS OF
UNIVERSITY TODAY
150 Former Students to Familiarize
Themselves with Campus
Problems
Alumnni visitors, 150 strong, will
once more mingle in University sur-
roundings and have an opportunity to
acquaint themselves with the prob-
lems and the aims of the University
at the University Alumni day which'
officially begins today.
A program of varied interest, rang-
ing from the visiting of classes to the
inspection of the naval tank and a
number of conferences, will fill the
day. The complete program follows:
8 to 9 o'clock-Registration in
Alumni Memorial hall.
9 to 11 o'clock-Class visiting.
11 o'clock-Conference in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.

12 to 2 o'clock-Luncheon in Bar-
bour gymnasium.
2 to 3:45 o'clock-Building inspec-

WESTERN GEMAYSWEPT BY MAY
DAY CRISIS1 STRIKES AND RIOTS
SPREAD.ING IN- CENTRAL__EMP[RES

HOLLAND DISPATCH BREAKS VEIL
OF SECRECY REGARDING
INTERNAL STRIFE
MAIN TROUBLE IN
INDUSTRIAL CENTERS
Russian Army Officer Killed by Bomb;
Austrian Disruptions Still
Unconfirmed
London, by Way of Holland, May 1.
-Out of the screen of secrecy and
scattering reports of a long-brewing
storm of discontent within the terri-
tory of the central powers comes the
news from Holland that strikes are
general in all the western part of
Germany. The news is regarded as
more authentic than any that has as
yet been sifted from the secret and
carefully watched news sources of the
central empires.
The news is still more definite and
rliable in that it points specifically
to Essen, the home of Germany's
heaviest truck manufacturing plants,
as being the scene of the most violent
internal disruption. No details of the
striae in the iIustrial city are given.
From the same source is suddenly
flashed the report that a riot of some
kind is taking place at Petrograd, and
that Major-General Kashpelimski was
killed by a bomb. The particulars in
this case are still indefinite except that
actual riots are still in progress, al-
though the sources for information
and details are carefully guarded.
The news coming from Holland is
taken as a certain sign that the May
day crisis is prevalent, and that all
western Europe is thrown into a de-
luge of strikes and riots. The mere
fact that the intenseness of the trou-
bled conditions is prevalent mainly in
the industrial centers, bears out the
prediction made for a long time by
those who were closely watching. the
situation and in touch with the few
sources of information. The actual
cause of the strike epidemic is not
known though it is generally believed
that it is due primarily to the food
scarcity and the strike plans made by
labor leaders for May day.
While the news from Holland is the
first reliable report of what the world
has suspected and awaited for several
weeks, the censorship of news and the
extraordinary measures taken by the
rulers of the central powers to pre-
vent the leakage of news of internal
troubles has hindered the securing of
particulars. It is regarded now by
nearly all the allied powers that in-
ternal troubles in Germany are as-
suming grave dimensions and that the
final outcome may result in the estab-
lishment of a republic of some kind.
Rumors of strikes and general riots
in Austria were still unconfirmed up
to a late hour last night, though un-
official reports from various sources
tend to indicate that strikes are in
progress there also.
VEREIN INITIATES
33 Students Elected to Honorary Ger-
man Society
Thirty-three members were initiated
into the Deutscher Verein last night in
the society's rooms. After the initia-
tion a banquet was given in honor o
the new members. The following stu-
dents were taken in:
Alice Eckert, '19, Helen Grable, '18,
Rebecca Greenberg, '19, GrQeso Gaines.
'19, Blarish Goodell, '19, Zora Hickox,

'18, Sarah Hall, '19, Olive Hagen, '18,
Ethel Jocelyn, '18, Cecil Johnston, '18,
Louise Kreger, '19,f, Florence Melcher,
'19, Hester Reed, '19.
Ella Rasmussen, '19, Marie Rummell,
'20, Mary L. Steere, '19, Ethel Glauz, -
'19, Christine Annabelle, '19, Rosa
Kingsbury, '19, James Beckman, '19,
Murray Coon, '18, W. R. Gross, '18,.
Karl Guenther, '19, Walter Gries, '19,
Abraham Herman, '19, Carl Johnson,
'20, Helmuth Maag, '19,, Hugh Mc-
Michael, '19, G. H. Nye, '19, Bertram
Schmidt, '19 Leonard Tappe, '19, Karl
Wilmot, '19 and Eric Watler '19.

LIT
TO

STUDENTS ASKED
PAY CLASS DUES

Last Chance to Pay Delinquent Dues
and Settle Up Accounts
with Class
Literary classes will close their
campaign for delinquent dues at. 3
o'clock today. Tables will be located
in front of the Library and payments
received between the hours of 11 and
12 and 1 and 3 o'clock.
Yesterday's collections were slowed
up considerably by the inclemency of
the weather and were probably hin-
dered to some extent by a lack of pub-
licity as to the campaign. With
slightly more favorable weather con-
ditions today's receipts should fill the
class coffers.
All students in the literary college
are urged to make a special effort to
square up their accounts today as the
classes are in need of all funds QW
lectable in order to settle with their
creditors. Never before has the need
of settling outstanding class accounts
been so urgent as it is at this time.
The tables will be moved inside the
west corridor of the Library in case
of rain or extremely cold weather.
$126,045 RAISED BY DETROIT
CITIZENS FOR BELGIANS' RELIEF
Detroit, Mlay 1.-Two hundred De-
troit citizens donated $126,045 towards
the Belgian relief fund at a banquet
held Monday night. Mme. Leom Du-
priez of Louvain, Belgium, graphical-
ly described the actual conditions in
her country as they exist today.
Professor Francis W. Kelsey of the
Latin department, who started the
movement in this state, emphasized
the worthiness of the cause. Gov. Al-'
bert E. Sleeper, Mayor Oscar B. Marx
and a score of Detroit's prominent
citizens were present.

tion.
3:45 to 5 o'clock-Conference
Natural Science auditorium.

in

J S. Toplon,' '19L, Weds Chicago Girl
Word was received yesterday that
Irving S. Toplon, '19L, of Chicago and
Miss Violet H. Gray of Chicago were
married last Friday in that city. The
young couple will reside at Malcom
apartments.

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