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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 29, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

All

-11

c I e irl i ttn ttil ll

de Largest Assortment
fne woolens in the city is here for your inspection. We think you'll
ee that never have you seen classier fabrics. Tailored in our in-
.table style in a suit to your measure, they will make you as smartly
ssed as any man in town.

G . Wild Company

iding Merchant Tailors

STATE STREET

Lee's Slotted Throat
TENNIS RACKETS
the Slater Book Shop
hone 430 36 S. State St.
k A

Bicycles

Switzers'
Hardware

Rackets

Bicycle
Repairing
Key ;Fitting
Razor Blade
Sharpening

Base Ball
Goods

a Mowers

-310 State
Only Hardware
Near Campus

. ..._

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

& co.

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be dbtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi' gan. Published every mornin-g except
Mmnday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Otces: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier, $2.5; by mail, $3.00
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup
ply Store ; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 3e0 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Park..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh-..Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn...................City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson.....Teleraph Editor
Marian Wilson... ..........Women's Editor
Leonard W. Nieter.... Ass't Telegraph Editor
DeForrest S. Rood..........Exchange Editor
J. E. Campbell....Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne.. Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau...-Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
C. M. tickling H. M. Carey
13. A.Swaney J. IL. Stadeker
L. S.'Thompson E. L. Zeigler
Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schererhorn, Jr.
R. H. Fricken G. O. Brophy
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R, T. McDlonald
C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Harold R. Smith Seymour [3. Wilson
Walter R. Payne Bervard WohI
SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1917.
Night Editor-D. If. Cruttenden
ADJUSTING OURSELVES TO
DEMOCRACY
The war is still less than three years
old, yet the results of the world con-
flict already accomplished are al-
most too great for the mind to grasp.
Russia has been changed from the
most autocratic monarchy to a demo-
cracy which promises to become the
United States of Russia, Germany finds
herself in the throes of a revolution
which threatens to overthrow the
kaiser and institute a parliamentary
form of government. Even in demo-
cratic England the cry has gone up
for a more truly democratic form of
government in which the executive'
office shall be made elective.
When the war began it was a fight!
for territory on the one hand, and for
the crushing of German militarism o
the other. In two years it has changed
into a gigantic strugle between demo-
cracy and autocracy, with the last.
great autocratic dynasty apparently
about to be hurled to its ruin. Out oft
the darkest period which the human
race has known is arising a new ex-
pression of the loftiest sentiments oft
an unfettered humanity.
And just as England is already con--
sidering the lesson which she mayt
draw from the political reformations
which are now taking place in Europe,
so should we pause for reflection. Is
America really free? Or, if so, has
her political freedom brought her peo-
ple that happiness which is so welcom-
ed by new freemen of Russia?
We have our political liberty, if we
care to exercise it. But it requiresT
constant progress in legislation to
keep pace with the steady march of
civilization. We must keels the two

i 4i
your duty to do, and do it to the best
of your ability.-Ohio State Lantern.
This fellow Cinnamon on the Illinois
baseball team ought to be a snappy
player.
We predict a huge crop of potato
bugs this season.
Are you going to drill, hoe, or slack
this summer?
"When Gerard tries to impeach my
patriotism he is simply lying" says
Champ Clark. And yet, Champ is
trying to block the measure which the
experience of history has proved es-
sential to successful warfare.
MEDICS ARE1ADVISEDTO
PREPARE BY, STUDYING
COUNCIL OF NATIONAL DEFENSE
SAYS STUDENTS SHOULD
REMAIN AT WORK
That it is not only a patriotic duty
but also a necessity for pre-medical
students to continue their collegiate
work, is shown in a letter received by
President Harry B. Hutchins from the
council of national defense.
The council urges that all prospec-
tive students of medicine remain un-
der instruction until such a time as
they are able to offer trained service
to their country. This step is of vital
importance, says the letter, owing to
the uncertainty of the length of the
war.
Pre-medies Should Not Enlist
Following are the communications:
"Washington, April 25, 1917.
"Dr. H. B. Hutchins, Pres.,
"University of Michigan,
"Ann Arbor, Mich.
"My Dear Sir: We beg leave to en-
close notice by the committee on med-
ical schools for your information. It
is quite evident that every possible
effort must be made to keep pre-med-
ical students from enlistment in the
line or sanitary organizations, thus
insuring a constant supply of medical
officers for the army and navy in case
the war should last several years.
"Might we urge you to use all your
influence in presenting this notice or
the spirit of its contents to pre-medical
students?
"Thanking you for your ,co-opera-
tion, we remain
"Very sincerely yours,
"FRANKLIN MARTIN,
"Member of the Advisory Commission,
Council of National Defense.
"F. F. SIMPSON,
"Chief of Medical Section, Council of
National Defense."
NOTICE TO 1EDIC AND
PRE-MEDICAL STUDENTS

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
MORNING SUBJECT:
"The Price of Freedom"
At 7:30 P. in, Mr. Doug-
as will review Sir Oliver
Lodge's new book, "Ray-
inoud,'' one of the greates. W1
contributions to the litera-
ture of supernormal connu-
nication.

AlI

TO

Sanitary
Dry Cl zanlng Co.
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
Suits
Made to Measure
$15 and up

,Al~illllil111Il~rr11r lrl11r ll ll llllll 111111lII 1llI I Ill lllll iillll111llil r°_ll
IN GOD'S OVT OF DOORS8
Gof Yoxur Rcreatioln Otat of
Tm
fTEMS-AZEDALLML01Ff
Prices zRi ant
m w
VNVCaT 7 aRSTRE
:11I1II11I111 Ii11 I1 IIIIIUHI1 i1llllll!111111111111l!1!! l1!!ii 11i ii

Rubber
Bathing Caps

ES

Take your Amateur Finishing

40c & 50c

Phone 2225

at

t06 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

II A llOL D IN' DONALD, EX-'17Lo
REl1IVES WIrNIDS IN WAR
Fornier Student from .ianaistee Lies
M Hospital ii Boulogne,

QUARRY DRUG CO'S.
Prescription Store
Cor. S*ate & N. University

We Offer You
CURITY - SERVICE - LOCATION
Resources $3,800,000
inn Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
an Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
-arch Offie--
707 North University Ave.
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best I* Modern Banking
SEOURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
nient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
!axed With Our Service, Two Offices
15 S. Main St - : 330 S. State St.
a typewriter from
0. MOR RIL L
322 south Stat. Street
ill furnish you a sinstruction
free of charge. You will be a
before you know It.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Betwoon Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Lmirc anairixpress Cars-7:35 a.
in., 8:io a. m: and hourly to 7:1o P. in., 9:1.
p. M.
vKalamazoo Limited Cars-8:49 a. o. and
every two hours to 6:48 p. i.; to Lansing,
8.:48 p In.
J.kson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7":48 p. im.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:40 a
at., 7:05 a. in. and every two hours to 7:o p.
M. 8:S p. in., 9:05 p. in., 10:50 P. M. tc
Y(psilanti only, 9:20 a. nm., 9:5o a.m.,:0 5 p
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6o5 a. m., ?:so a
rn., 1 o:20 p.m. 12:20a.5M.
Swain
Twenty-two remarkable. photo-
graphs of the Greek Play. Come
in and see them.
73 E. VNIVERSITY
" A Alarm Clocks
CEI 0 EE' ° $1.00 up
Fountain Pens-
r RSOtER8Mp 6
Waterman and Conln
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MODERN BARBER SHOP
332 State St.
A Particular Place
for Particular People.
FRANK O ,BOLICH, Prop,
MANY LAW STUDENTS ENROLL
IN MILITARY DRILL COURSE

France

/

With gunshot wounds in his right
leg, sustained in a hand grenade at-
tack along the allies' front in France,
April 11, Harold C. McDonald, ex-'17L,
lies wounded in a hospital in Boulogne,
France. He left school January 3, 1916,
and enlisted with the Canadian troops
at Windsor, Ont.
The news forwarded by Canadian
headquarters at Ottawa to his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. McDonald of Man-
istee, Mich., gives no further details,
but it is known that he was serving
with the hand grenade section of the
19th battalion. He participated in
theo Somme offensive and later was at
Verdun, but escaped death in both ac-
tions.
While in Ann Arbor McDonald
roomed at the Baptist Guild house.
He is a nephew of Mr. Albert C.
Carnett of Ann Arbor.
I' of Iasas Fornms Field Battery
Lawrence, Kans., April 28.-Thirty
University of Kansas men have enlist-
ed in the battery of field artillery be-
ing organzed in the city.
For results advertise in The MJchi-
gan Daily.

m

VIE GUARANTEE
$300.00
to college students for a full
summer's work. For full infor-
mation write
THE NATIONAL MAP CO.
Indianapolis, Indiana
FRESHMEN ARE SILENT ABOUT
CLASSICAL CLUB PROGRAM
Little information caa be gleaned
concerning the program which is
freshmen members of the Classical
club will present at the meeting at S
o'clock Tuesday, night in Alumni Mem-
orial hall. Sphinx-like silence pre-
vails. Beyond a guarantee that a
Shakespearean tragedy will not be pre-
sented, no inkling of the plans can be
obtained. Strict censorship is being
exercised.
The evening, will begin with a short
business meeting, Which all members
of the club are requested to attend.

PL A I N

SQUEY

-30c

FRIED RICE, (plain), 25c
At All Times
Everyday have Fresh Home-
Made Hot Rolls served here-2
Rolls and Butter-5c.
Open 11 A. M.to 1 A. X.
ichigan Inn 611 E, Liberty
Telephone 948-R
Women
First rounds of the the tennis
ornament should be played off by
ldnesday of this week.
Girls who are willing to contribute
ney for yarn and needles should see
ss Alice Evans at Barbour gymnas-
..
Classes in home nursing begin this
ek according to schedule. Registra-
n must be made from 2 to 5 o'clock
norrow afternoon at the office of the
ector in Barbour gymnasium.
esh Lits Plan Frolic at Armory
)wing to the flourishing financial
idition of the fresh lit class, and to
success of their matinee dances,
committee is considering plans
a freshman frolic, to be given dur-
the second or third week In Mx
e affair will be an informal dance,
i will probably be held at the

in constant relation which insures
domestic tranquility, or we will find
that our constitution is but so many
words, made ineffective by the failure
of our representative government to
keep abreast of the times.
It is not enough that we should
know that America stands for demo-
cracy. We must be vigilant to render
our democracy constantly effective.
DO YOU YOUR OWN TASK WELL
A n1ew atmosphere is discernible
about the campus. One finds difficulty

According to reports from the of- I in concentrating interest on everyday

flee of the secreatry of the Law school,
a great number of the law students
are availing themselves of the op-
portunitydto enroll in the course in
military dill that is to start tomor-
row.
All law students who take this
course will be exempt from taking one
of their final examinations, providing
they attend classes regularly and meet
the drill requirements.
Any who desire to take this work
can make arrangements with Prof.
E. C. Goddard, secretary of the Law
school, in his office tomorrow or Tues-
day,
Sophl Lits Drill Monday Afternoon
A regular drill for soph lits will
be held at 4 o'clock tomorrow after-
noon in front of Waterman gymnas-
ium. It is hoped that a large num-
her of men will report, as competent;
drill masters have been secured,

things. An air of something like ab-
straction, combined with one of high
nervous tension, pervades everything.
The cloud of war, in short, is cast-
ing a shadow over all other interests.
No one knows what is coming next,
and as we wonder, we are in danger of
forgetting what is present.
This tendency needs to be checked.
While one remains in the University,
it is fair to assume that he feels this
to be his place of duty for the time
being. By the same reasoning, it is
his duty to give the best of his efforts'
to the tasks which are at hand.
If a man feels that his place is not
here, then he should leave, as many
of his fellows have already done. -
Only by following one of these two
courses can one be true to the ideals
which should guide him in the present
national crisis.
The rule which should guide us at
all times, but more especial now, is
this: Pick out the task which it isa

"In the present national crisis, a
continuous supply of adequately
trained medical officers is absolutely
essential for the maintenance of armed
forces in the field. It would be folly
for the country to prepare for the im-
mediate emergency alone-we must
face the possibility of the war lasting
for years. It is, therefore, the pa-
triotic duty of all college students in-
tending to study medicine to remain
under instruction until the country can
avail itself of their trained services.
"Medical schools are in a sense
'munition works' necessary to produce
trained officers for the army and navy.
All medical students must, therefore,
in the interest of national safety, con-
tinue their work until graduation.
"With the exception of such men as
the navy can utilize, all gaduates
are urged to secure a hospital train-
ing which the surgeons-general of the
army and navy consider essential for
their arms of the service.
"FRANKLIN MARTIN,
"Member of Advisory Commission,
Council of National Defense.
"F. F. SIMPSON, .
"Chief of Medical Section, Council of
National Defense.
"Committee onWedical Schools:
"Joseph Marshall Flint, Chairman,
"Arthur Dean Bevan,
"Thomas W. Huntington,
"Edward Martin,
"Charles H. Peck,
"Winford Smith."
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. tt

8 Hor Service

KODAK FINISHING

and Enlarging

I" A

Films left before 9 A. M., ready same day at 5 P. M.

Devefoping 1Oc

Printing 3c to 5c

Films left before 7 P. M. ready next day at NOON.

Print

orders left before NOON, ready same day at 5 P. M.
SPECIAL PRICES ON DEVELOPING 6 OR MORE
FILMS or PRINTING 50 or more pictures.
EASTMAN KODAKS, FILMS AND SUPPLIES
RESULTS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. GIVE
US ONE TRIAL AND BE CONVINCED
Arcade Floral Shop

KODAKS

/

FLORISTS

Phone 600

Cor. Arcade and Maynard

.

I

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