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April 29, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
CONTINUED COOL
TODAY

Ai

tii

UNITED PRES
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

a

I

4

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OL. XXVIL.No. 146.ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN

Congress

P asses

Draft

Army

Bill

Late

at

Night by Sweeping Total

of

478-32

THOUSANDS GREET
T. R. AT CHICAGO

DR. SCOTT NEARING fI
TO LECTURE TODAY fl10jTfl' FH
l4'ormer Penn Professor Speaks This
Morning in First Baptist WORK
Church

PHI BETA KAPPA TO
"Vfr r T~tz k:XlkrBT G

PCK NEW MEMI
honor Society Will Make
Election from Seniors
Tuesday

Annual

V0,000 Persons Hear Leader
Middle West to War and
Colors

Call

"PUT MEN ON FIRING LINE,"
TlEME OF COLONEL'S SPEECH
Urges Volunteer System to Supple-
ment Administration Plan for
Raising Army
By A .E. Johnson
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Chicago, April 28.-Fifty thousand
persons greeted Theodore Roosevelt
as he called the middle west to war
tonight, 'to prove that those who are
fit to live are not afraid to die."
,More than 20,000 lammed the large
hall which has been the scene of many
Roosevelt triumphs, while 30,000 oth-
ers filled the streets for blocks around
the pavilion. Roosevelt had heralded
his Chicago war address as "the
speech of his life," and Chicago, where
the west begins, welcomed her idol as
she never before welcomed a leader.
The hall, inside and out, was bur-
ried beneath the tri-colors, red, white,
and blue. A score of bands kept the
crowd constantly on its feet through
two hours of waiting, that preceeded
the arrival. of the speaker. It was
just 8 o'clock when Roosevelt entered
the amphitheater. As he emerged
through a mass of American, French,
and British flags the throng rose and
cheered 10 minutes.
Put Flag on Firing Line
"Put the flag on the firing line," was
the great theme that ran through his
speech, at each repetition of which
volumes of applause was elicited from
the assembled multitude.
The speaker appealed to his audi-
ence to make good the message con-
tained in President Wilson's address
of April 2, maintaining that like the
Declaration of Independence and Lin-
coln's Gettysburg address, it would be-
come a great state document of the
nation's history, only if backed up "by
the deeds of the fighting men."
In speaking of President Wilson's
proposal to raise an army on the prin-
ciple of universal obligatory military
training and service, Colonel Roose-
velt asserted that it should be de-
manded as a right and not asked as
a favor by all the young men of the
country capable of bearing arms. "This
is the principle I have long advocated
with all the fervor of conviction. It
is the only real democratic principle
on which permanently -to shape the
military policy of this country," he
added.
Fierce Fighting
T urns Defenses
British Push Advance Over Six Miles
on Famous IIindenburg
Front"
By Ed L. Keen
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, April 28.-In fighting that,
for intensity rnd desperation, equaled
any of the conflicts of the two and a
half years of the great war, British
forces tonight had apparently turned
the first of Germany's great defense
lines on the famous "Hindenburg
front," advancing on a front of more
than six miles.
Part of Oppy was in British hands.
The town lies six miles northeast of
Arras. All of Arbieux, a mile further
north of Oppy, had been taken. Both
cities are supposed to constitute the
northern point of the "Wotan line."
Most positions tonight were centers
for German counter attacks that for
sheer violence surpassed any recent
fighting on the western front; even in-
cluding the bloody engagement of

"Social Religion," an interpretation
of Christianity in terms of modern
life, will be thesubject of Dr. Scott
Nearing's lecture at 10:45 this morn-
ing in the First Baptist church.
Dr. Nearing has attracted nation-
wide interest because of his recent
resignation of a professorship in the
University of Toledo, and because of
his being dropped from the faculty of
the University of Pennsylvania a few
years ago. Both actions were the re-
sult of his radicalism.
His field of work is along economic
and social reformation. He is the au-
thor of many books, among which are
"Income," "Reducing the Cost of Liv-
ing," "Poverty and Riches," and "So-
cial Religion." It is from the latter
book that he has taken the material
for his lecture today.
After his lecture, Dr. Nearing will
answer questions regarding his views.
Seats will be reserved for members
of the church until 10:30. Through
an error in yesterday's Daily, the lec-
ture was reported to take place at
11:45 instead of 10:45.
"CLASS ODUES" D1AS TO
SWILL COLLECT FROM STUDENTS
THIS WEEK TO EASE FI-
NANCIAL STRAIN
Literary classes in the University
wil observe the newly inaugurated
"Class Dues" days of the College of
Literature, Scince, and the Arts on
Tuesday and Wednesday of this week.
Officers of the four classes have com-
pleted all preparations for the most
sweeping campaign for back dues ever
attempted at the University.
Strained circumstances in several of
the classes brought to the minds of the
officers a realization of the necessity
to enter upon some plan for the col-
lection of dues whereby sufficient
funds could be brought into the treas-
uries to clear up indebtedness, and as
a result a system involving the co-op-
eration of the four classes was
adopted.
Under the supervision of the class
treasurers the finance conmittees
have appointed representatives in
every fraternity, sorority, house club,
and dormitory on the campus, and to
these representatives falls the duty of
collecting all back and current dues
in the respective houses. Literary stu-
dents not residents in any of the or-
ganized houses will have twol days'
time in which to pay their dues at a
desk on the campus, the place to be
announced in the Tuesday issue of
The Daily.
Delta Sigma Rho
Initiates Seven
Honorary Oratorical and Debating
Fraternity Holds Annual Ban-
qnet at Union
Seven campus orators were initiated
into Delta Sigma Rho, honorary ora-
torical and debating fraternity, at its
annual initiation yesterday morning
in the Alpha Nu rooms.
The banquet was held last evening
at the Union. George C. Claassen,
'17L, acting as toastmaster. The
neophytes were: Archie L. Levine, '18,
James Schermerhorn Jr., '18, Neal D.
Ireland, '18L, Leslie W. Lisle, '17L,
William P. Sandford, '19, Robert W.
Ward, '18, and Ralph M. Carson, '17.

Lit Students Hear Rules About With-
drawing from Uni-
versity
PASS ON APPLICATIONS TO
LEAVE SCHOOL TOMORROW

"Don't Go to the Farm
Conscription," Advises
Effinger

to Evade
Dean

"Don't be a slacker and have father
and mother put you under cover by
going to the farm to evade conscrip-
tion, if you have not had farm experi-
ence or your going will not material-
ly increase the food production," was
Dean John R. Effinger's advice to the
250 men of the literary college who
gathered yesterday afternoon in the
Natural Science auditorium, when the
method of granting credits to studentsl
who withdraw from the University to
do farm labor, was discussed.
In order that definite action may be
taken by the committee on military in-
struction and service, recently ap-
pointed by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins, Dean Effinger explained certainI
regulations that have been set up
which should govern the student in
making application for credits.
Rules Are Stateda
First, the student should submit hisj
application in writing, giving an ex-;
planation of his particular case, ac-
companied by a statement from his
parents or some other person desiring
to employ the student, stating that the
student's help is necessary; second,j
that the statement from the parents,
or prospective employer must be in,
full, not in the form of a short tele-
gram; and third, that a letter of rec-
ommendation from some member of
the faculty with which the student is
acquainted, must accompany the ap-
plication.
Credits granted will not be finally
registered until about July 1, when
the student must submit to the de-
partment a statement signed by the
parent, or the student's employer, and
sworn to in the presence of a notary
public that the student is working on
the farm as promised in his applica-
tion. No credits will be finally granted
until his sworn statement is received.
In the case of seniors, this statement
should come in as soon after June 20
as possible, in order to permit such
seniors to graduate with their class.
Late Return Allowed
Regarding the matter of- returning
in the fall, it is hoped by the author-
ities that proper arrangements will be
made in due time. But if any student
should be delayed on account of late
harvest and sufficient proof will be
submitted that the student could not
return in time, he will be permitted
to return as late as six weeks. His
courses will be arranged accordingly.
Dean Effinger stated that in the case
of lit-medics, the department has been
(Continued on Page Six.)

Phi Beta Kappa,,.honor society, will
hold its annual meeting for the elec-
tion of members from the senior class
to the society at 4 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon in room 205 Mason hall.
The final list of seniors to be elected
has not been made up yet, but the
membership committtee of the society
will hold a meeting Monday for the
last selection of those who will be
submitted for membership.
The new members will be received
into the society at another meeting to
be held May 11.
'GRMNS MAY MAKE
GENERAL PEACE MOVE
IF SEPARATE RUSSIAN TREATY
FAILS; EXPECT NEW
CONCESSIONS
B Arthur E. Mann
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Copenhagen, April 28.-Unless Ger-
many succeeds in enticing Russia into
a separate peace in the immediate
future she will strenuously resume her
efforts for a general peace. More-
over, this time she will seek to coax
peace on her own terms, but with a
great show of concessions from her
previous positions. This information
came tonight from an exceedingly well
informed diplomatic source.
Austria, more sincere than Germany,
in desiring peace because of the great-
er unrest in the dual monarchy, is
urging abandonment of all occupied
territory for the sake of immediate
peace. Turkey, too, is said to be press-
ing for peace. Her troops are being
thrown back in diaster after disaster
in Messopotamia and Palestine.
SPEAKS ON ACHIEVEMENTS
IN CITY PLANNING TODAY
Ann Arbor and its achievements in
city planning will form the basis of
an address to be given by H. W. Doug-
las at 11:45 o'clock this morning at
the First Congregational church.
Mr. Douglas, who is a member of
the board of park commissioners, will
give a history of the beautification
Iplans of Ann Arbor, while next Sun-
day Robert W. Hemphill will discuss
the needs of the city along these lines.
MILITARY SMOKER FOR FRESH
LITS TO BE GIVEN TUESDAY
Fresh lits will meet at 7:15 o'clock
Tuesday evening at the Union to at-
tend a "military" smoker. Men prom-
inent in campus military activities will
speak. The prime object of this gath-
ering is to interest more freshmen in
military drill. An abundance of cider
and smokes will be on hand, and the
freshman jazz band will furnish mu-
sic for the occasion.

TO RAISE 2000,000 MENFOR UNITEf STATES
BY MEANS OF SELECTIV CONSCRIPTION JOINT
CONFERENCE MUST SETTLE AGE LIMIT PROBLEM
ROOSEVELT VOLUNTEER PLAN, PROHIBITION
AND OTHER DETAILS NEXT TO
RECEIVE ATTENTION
Washington, April 28.-Contrary to the previous policy of the nation,
the repiblic will raise its army of 2,000,000 men by selective conscription.
The draft army bill passed both house and senate shortly beforemid-
night. The house approved by a vote of 397 to 24; the senate, 81 to 8. The
senators voting against the bill were:
Borah, Gore, Gronna, Hardwick, Kirby, LaFollette, Thomas, and Tram-
anell.
Joint conferences next week between the house and senate must
settle the details of the two measures. At present there are noticeable
differences.
The senate bill authorizes the Roosevelt volunteer division which
'rie house overwhelmingly rejected. The senate voted the army dry,
while army prohibition was thrown out in the house by a point of or.
der. The senate bill would draft men between 21 and 27, the house, men
between 21 and 40. Other minor differences will also have to be settled.

MAR CASTLE PRAISES
STUDENTS' DRILL WORK;;
EXAMINES MEN TO RECOMMEND,
TO FIVE OFFICERS' TRAIN- t
ING CAMPS
Student companies started by the
various colleges have made excellent;
progress up to the present time, ac-
cording to Major Charles W. Castle.
Because of the volunteer nature ofj
these companies, however, Major
Castle really has no official relation
with them, and will not have until a
cadet corp is regularly enrolled.
Unless some students from here can
obtain commissions through officers'a
training camps, Michigan will make a
poor showing in the war, in compari-
son with the other large universities,
Major Castle stated. Cornell claims
that 10,000 of its graduates are of
suitable age and experience to qualify
as officers as a result of its military
course which was instituted 50 years
ago.
Major Castle has been working con-
tinuously upon applications for ad-
mission to officers' training camps, the
rosters of which will be completed by
May 1.
As a result of examinations held
yesterday, the following were recom-
mended 'tonofficers' training camps:
Fort Snelling, Minn., Douglas F.
Smith, '17L, Hepburn Ingham, '19L,
Gordon B. Pearson, '19; Fort Ben-
jamin Harrison, Ind., Alfred Hays, '19,
Russell Kehol, '19L, Walter Johnson,
'19L, Arthur Bogue, '18L, Harley Keen,
'19; Fort Riley, Kan., Albert Stoll, '17.
Presidio' of San Francisco, Cal., John
Wilson, '18; Fort Sheridan, Ill., War-
ren Huss, '19L, Willard Huss, '18, Don
McCloud, '17L, Eugene Houseman,
'17L, Dr. Rufus Tucker, Charles Fisch-
er, William Williams, '18, John Knox,
'17E, Venner Brace, William Darnall,
'18, Harold Easley, '18L, Stephen Mart-
indale, Vivian Mauser, James Clark,
'17, Paul Strawhecker, '19, Barnard
Pierce, '17L, William Carl, '18E, Wil-
liam Loutit, '18, Edward Seese, '17L,
Lee Richardson, '17L, George Ohr-
strom, '19L, V. Alton Moody, grad.,
Lynd Walkling, '19, Maurice Piatt,
James McDavid, '18.

By J P. Yoder
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, April 28.-While con-
gress tonight was talkling its way
closer to the inevitable, the writing of
a -.selective conscription statute, the
war department, finally assured that
the senate and house would authorize
the president to choose an army of
2,000,000 as he sees fit, announced of-
ficially that the first half million men
would be called to the colors about
September 1 next.
Houses Split on Age Limit
Should the war last another year,
two out of every five of America's
able-bodied men will be called out.
The senate decided on age limits of
21 to 27 years inclusive. The house
voted for conscripting men between
the ages of 21 to 40 inclusive. Agree-
ment to be reached in conference com-
mittee next week probably will state
some average between the two.
Begin Registration at Once
The war machine will begin forma-
tion with volunteer registration of
men eligible. Slackers will be gone
after later. Of the more than 7,000,-
000 who will register, between 600,-
000 and 800,000 will be drawn by the
jury wheel system. After physical,
imdustrial, and other exemptions are
allowed it is expected 500,000 will re-
main. These will be placed immedi-
ately in training. The equipment is
expected to be ready for them at once.
Senate Acts on Two Amendments
Up to 10 o'clock tonight the sen-
ate had acted positively on only two
amendments. These were the com-
mittee amendments offered by Senator
Chamberlain to make the new draft
army bone dry, and the age limit
clause. Senator Underwood added an
amendment proposing to include both
houses of congress in the prohibition
clause. This caused an uproar of bit-
ter debate. After three hours the
amendment was adopted.
Miss J. Rankin Against Amendment.
A feature of the day in the house
was the vote of Miss Jeannette Rankin
among 97 others against the Kahn
amendment which returned the meas-
ure to virtually the same provision as
submitted originally to the house by
the president and the war department.
Amendments. Adopted in House
Important action in the house on
the army bill included the following:
Adoption of the Kahn amendment;
adoption of an amendment to prohibit
payment of bounties to men who en-
list in the army or national guard, and
prohibiting drafted men from obtain-
ing substitutes; adoption of an amend-
ment by which every state must get
its quota of troops for the army in
proportion to its population; adoption'
of an amendment by which boys under
21 years cannot enlist in the regular
army or national guard without their
parents' consent; defeat of an amend-
ment that would have exempted con-
scientious objectors from military
service; striking out on a point of
order of an amendment prohibiting the
(Continued on Page Six.)

Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division Streets.
10:30 A. M. Leonard A. Barret
Theme-" The Hand of God in American History"
Noon. Major Wm. C. Castle
speaks to Bible Classes.
6:30 Young People's Meeting.
Wesleyan Guild Lecture
Dr. Ernest F. Tittle
Pastor of the Broad Street M. E. Church. Columbus, Ohio
Tonight Methodist Church Tonight
7:e3OUS C urh7:20

CLEAR $1,000 ON FRIDAY
NIGHT'S RED CROSS

BALL

Ambulance Corps Exam Passed by 95
Seattle, Wash., April 28.-Ninety-
five men have successfully passed the
physical examination for membership
in the ambulance corps of the Uni-
versity of Washington.

Although complete reports have not
yet been turned in, more than $1,000
has been realized already as the result
of the Red Cross ball held Friday
night. This amount includes the re-
ceipts from the the sale of refresh-
ments and the other concessions which
were conducted on a percentage basis.
This money will beturned over at
once to the local branch of the Red
Cross for use in purchasing equip-
ment

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