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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 22, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4DAILY

Ay

111 cj~g 3iriotrnt Bat

Ilie Largest Assortment
fine woolens in the city is here for your inspection. We think you'll
ee that never have you seen classier fabrics. Tailored in our in-
table style in a suit to your measure, they will make you as smartly
ssed as any man in town.

G. H. Wild Company

ading Merchant Tailors

STATE STREET

Military Drill Books
Plattsburg Manual Moss's Manual
Infantry Drill Regulations

man

"he Slater Book Shop
one 430 336 S. State St.

Bicycles
ennis
Rackets
Base Ball
Goods
iwn Mowers

Switzers'
Hardware

Bicycle

Official newspaper at the University of
MP .tgan. Published every morning except
M.nday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
O1fices: - Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2-5; by mail, $.o.
'Want ad. stations: 6juarry'; Students' Sus -
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn............... City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson... ..........Women's Editor
Leonard W. Nieter.... Ass't Telegraph Editor
DeForrest S. Iood..........Exchange Editor
J. F. Campbell... Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery.. Assistant Business Manager
Albert R. Horne.. Assistant Busines. Manager
Roscoe R. Rau. ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
C. M. tickling 1If. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney J. L. Stadeker
L. S. Thompson E. L. Zeigler
tI. C. Garrison
C. S.Clark Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schermerhorn, Jr.
R. H. Fricken G. 0. Brophy
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R. T. McDonald
C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
Walter R. Payne Bernard Wohl
SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1917.
Night Editor-I. C. Garrison

I

10:30 A. M.

UNIARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
10:30-"Mr. Britling Sees It Through"
-Lessons for America from Wells'
Great War Novel. Address by Mr.
Loring.
11:45-Taxation of Capital and the
War. Address by Prof. Sellars be-
fore Social Service Class.
6:30-The Students and the War. Dis-
cussion led by Mr. R. W. Jennings,
Mr. Max Blumer, Mr. J. C. Stern.

Topic:
"When Roses Are Weeds"

IN GOD'S OVT OF DOORS
Ot Your Recreadtiori Oixt of
ETEvNNIS DASEDALL b GOLFI
Ousr Sock is complete and
Prices Right
UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
.ssssnssu ssssll1I snl aall I ml li s t 111111111111s 11n as as11111s sissssmsnssssis

Mr. Douglas
preaches

I
I
I

: Repairing
Key Fitting
Razor Blade
Sharpening

310 State
Only Hardware
Near Campus

i

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD

& CO.

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

106 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

We Offer You
CURITY- -SERVICE - -LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo,ooo
nn Arbor Savings Bank.
-Incorporated 1869
in Office--
lorthwest Corner Main and Huron
anch Office--
707 North University Ave.
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
3fftrs the Best in Modern Banking
5ECURITY - - - EFFICIENCY
ilent and Pleasant Quarters. You will
aed With Our Service. Two Offices
5 8. Main St. 330 S. State St.
a typewriter from
D MORRILL
222 South State Street
ill furnish you an instruction
free of charge. You will be a
before you know it.

P L A I N

lOP SUEY

- 30c1

ED. MICE, (plain), 25c
At All Times

Everyday have Fresh Home-
Made Hot Rolls served here-2
Rolls and Butter-5c.
Open 11 A. I. to 1 A. N.
ichigan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 948-R.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Lirtea and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., 8:ro a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10
v. mn.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-S:4$ a. m and
every two hours to 6:48 p. in.; to Lansing,
8:48 p. in.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7-:48 p. mn.
Local Cars Eastbound- :35 a. m 6:40 a.
m., 7 .5 a. m. and every two hours to 7 :5 p.
M., 8:eS p. m., 9:05 p. in., 10:50 p. in. to
Ypsilanti only, 9:o a. ., 9:50 a. M., 2:05 p.
Mn, 6:.5 p. in., 11:45 p. in., t :io a. in., 1:2(;
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:os a. m., 7:so a.
MI., 10:20 P. M. 12:30 a. i.
Swain
Twenty-two remarkable photo-
graphs of the Greek Play. Come
in and see them.
71 3 . NIVErRSITY
otAMS ERS EW R Alarm Clocks
SN1L NDER ANO YIED $1.00 up
Fountain Pens-
Waterman and Conklin
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MODERN BARBER SHOP
.332 State St.
A Particular Place
for Particular People.
FRANK G. OLCH, Prop,
COMMITTEE ANNOUNCES STATE
APPOINTMENTS FOR TEACHERS
The committee on appointments
which is placing teachers for the com-
ing year has announced the following
appointments in the state of Michigan:
Helen F. Cone, grad., and Pearl 0.
Primiau, '17, will take positions in the
English and history departments at
Alma. Harriet L. Bird, grad., and
Elizabeth S. Arthur, '17, will enter the
English department at Highland Park.
Susie M. Bidwell, '17, will teach math-
ematics at Flint, and Geta L. Tucker,
'17, will teach English and history at
Otsego. Paul E. Brown, '17, goes to
Ionia to enter the science department,
and Loren R. Brink, '17, is to take the
superintendency at Newberry.
Describes Campus War Preparation
The University news letter, which is
published each week by Prof. John R.
Brumm, in its last number discusses
what Michigan is doing in preparing
her reserve forces for war. The let-
ter reaches more than 200 papers in
Michigan.

DEMOCRACY AND THE PRESS
America is at war to defend de-
mocracy, yet sihe is considtering a
most autocratic step in the espionage
bill now being considered by congress.
In war as in peace the people of an
enlightened democracy should know
what their nation is doing. At a time
when the one newspaper in Germany
that is nearly free declares that a de-
mocracy leads to liberty through
knowledge, Americans should be loath
to take the first step against the in-
stitution which has made possible the
origin and development of democracy
in this country.
America must know the facts in this
war, else democracy will be branded
a failure-a pleasant thing to be en-
joyed in times of peace. Let the cen-
sorship be rather on communication
with foreign nations, for it is in the
acquisition of information by our
enemies that the great danger lies.
Our own faults must be made known
to us in order that they may be cor-
rected. The keeping of information
from an enemy in time of war is a
necessary thing. The withholding of
information concerning its own gov-
ernment from a democratic, people is
an act of autocracy.
When a harnessed press in Germany
is beginning to make the first expres-
sions of a rising democracy heard, it
is not a time for triumphant America
to enslave the press which has played
so great a part in her development.
Let it be an unfettered democracy
which brings the German nation,
bound hand and foot by an insane up-
per class, to a complete surrender.
Most'students are really preparing,
while others are merely purchasing
"trench" coats.
With Major Castle's arrival tomor-
row we will be able to proceed more
definitely in the war preparations.
Since the Carnegie Peace board and
other organizations of the kind are
urging a war to the limit it would not
seem out of order for some of our
local pacifists to fall into line.
REI) CROSS BALL COMMITTEES
WILL MEET TUESDAY EVENING
Mr. George W. Millen, chatpman of
the committee in charge of the ball
for the benefit of the Red Cross, re-
quests the members of the sub-commit-
tees and all who wish to assist in
the sale of tickets to meet at his
home, 912 Geddes avenue, at 8 o'clock,
Tuesday evening, April 24.
This will be the last meeting of the
committees, and all those who have
been selling tickets should be pre-;
pared to report how many they have
sold.
The funds of the ball will go in
part to help the personal equipment
of the boys in the army and naval mil-9
itia and to aid in the purchase of
supplies for the manufactur of surgic-
al supplies and hospital dressings.
My diamonds are fine quality and<
reasonably priced. J. L. Chapman,
Jeweler. 113 Main St.-Adv. wed-eod
Try The Daily for service.,

SCHOOL CHILDREN TO
AID INFOOD SUPPLY
WILL WORK ON CITYS GARDEN
LOTS AFTER HOURS; MEET
TODAY
That the city of Ann Arbor will
again probably be the forerunner of a
state wide movement was indicated by
a campaign that was started yester-
day to have the schools of the city
close at 3 o'clockeach afternooncin
order to have the children work on the
city lots that are being gardened to in-
crease the food supply of Ann Arbor.
The plan is being pushed by the Ann
Arbor Civic association and an effort
is being made to have the movement
taken up by all the cities of the state.
A meeting of all those interested in
the plan will be held at 3 o'clock this
afternoon in Lane hall.
At a meeting of the representatives
of the Civic association and the Wash-
tenaw County Farm bureau yesterday
the following were appointed to co-op-
erate with the county agent of the
Michigan War Preparednes board to
find out exactly how much land is
available for farming and how much
food could be raised in the country:
A. F. Smith, chairman; H. A. Burnham,
secretary; H. J. Abbott, A. C. Stein, E.
B. Manwaring, George McCalla, George
Gill, Evan Essery, and Herman Hass.
The county agent of the State Pre-
paredness Board for Washtenaw coun-
ty has not yet been selected. W. E.
Underdown has been offered the pos-
ition but he has not yet decided wheth-
er he will accept or not.
An effort is being made to have man-
ufacturers close down their factories
for a certain number of days each
week in order to permit their employ-
ees to work on farms. In this way, it
is expected the maximum food supply
of the county will be reached.
SUNDAY SERVICES IN
ANN AROR CHURCHES

Sanitary
Dry Cleaning Co.
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
Suits
Made to Measure
$15 and up
Phone 2225

Rubber
Bathing Caps

DAI

City News
The City council at its meeing to
be held tomorrow night will decide on
the 25 applicants for liquor bonds that
it has received. This number is three
below the number received last year.
Frank DeVine, city attorney, will
speak at the meting of the social ser-
ice class of the Congregational church
shortly after noon today on City
Planning Legislation."
APRIL ALUMNUS DISCUSSES
MICHIGAN'S WAR PREPARATION
Military training and preparedness
are the prominent subjects discussed
in the April Michigan Alumnus, which
left the press yesterday.
"Face to Face with War," is the
subject of an editorial in which the
part Michigan is preparing to, do in
the service of the country is discussed.
Other articles of interest are "Pro-
gress on the New Library," and "The
Medicine of the American Indian."
Delta Cafe-Dinner dances by ar-
rangement.-Adv. 19-21-22

--
IF you want to insure your
summertime comfort allow
us to become your laundry-
men. We will treat your house-
hold linens or your personal
garments in a manner that will
meet with your entire approba-
tion. Our prices please.
Moe Laundry
Phone 2355 204 No. Main St.

Wfomen

at
UARRY DRUG CO'S
Prescription Store
Cor. Wats & N. University

40c & 50c

Take your Amateur Finishing
TO

There will be a meeting of the cast
f the Junior Girls' play at 4 o'clock
>day in Barbour gymnasium to make
efunds of the two dollar deposit.
Geneva club meets at 4:15 o'clock
:onday at Newberry hall. Members
re asked to bring their dues.
Senior society meets at 7:30 o'clock
onday evening at 509 Thompson
reet.
Students and War," Subject of Talks
"The Relation of Students to War,"
ill be the subject of the discussion
the meeting of the Unitarian Stu-
mnts' society this evening. The meet-
g will be held at 6:30 o'clock in
e church parlors at the corner of
uron and State streets. The speak-
s will be Ralph Jennings, '17E,
acob Stern, '17, and Max Blumer,
7M.
Special discount to class baseball
ams. Cushing's Pharmacy.-Adv.

First Congregational Church
Sermon by Rev. Douglas at 10:30.
Subject: "When Roses Are Weeds."
First Baptist Church
Morning worship at 10:45. Sermon
by Dr. J. N. Field of Los Angeles.
St. Andrew's Church
Services held at 7:30 and 10:30
o'clock, and 4:30 o'clock.
First M. E. Church
Rev. Dr. J. B. Smith of Chicago de-
livers morning sermon at 10:30.
Presbyterian Church
Rev. Leonard A. Barrett speaks on
"The Ideal Government,"' at 10:30
morning services.
German M. E. Church
Rev. H. Bau delivers morning ser-
mon at 10:30.
St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran
Regular preaching services at 10:30.
English services at 7:60.
Community Chapel
J. M. Wells will speak on "The
Christian Message to America in Its
Present Crisis." Services 7:30 o'clock.
Church of Christ (Scientist)
Sunday service 10:30. Subject:
"Doctrine of Atonement."
Broadway M. E. Church
Regular Sunday services at 10:30
and 7:30.
Bethel A. M. E. Church
Morning worship at 10:30. Sermon,
"The Invisible Presence of God."
Glenn Coulter, Improving, Out Soon
Glenn M. Coulter, '18L, president of
the Michigan 'Union,who was taken
sick with scarlet fever during spring
vacation, is recovering. He will be
confined to the hospital for about a
week yet.
The - Delta-Best fraternity house
prices-Adv. 19-21-22

49

Developing 1 Oc

Printing 3c to 5c

ES

8 Hour Service

KODAK FINISHING

and Enlarging

Special discount to class baseball'
teams. Cushing's Pharmacy.-Adv.

®-

Films left before 9 A. M., ready same day at 5 P. M.

Films left before 7 P. M. ready next day at NOON.

Print

orders left before NOON, ready same day at 5 P. M.
SPECIAL PRICES ON DEVELOPING 6 OR MORE
FILMS or PRINTING 50 or more pictures.
EASTMAN KODAKS, FILMS AND SUPPLIES
RESULTS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS. GIVE
US ONE TRIAL AND BE CONVINCED
Arcade Floral Shop

KODAKS

FLORISTS

Phone 600,

Cor. Arcade and Maynard

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