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April 22, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-22

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND U)OLERi
TODAY

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UNITED PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOI. XXVII. No. 140. ANN ARBOR, MICHWIIAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE]

Y.MC.A. CAMIGN
TO0 BEGINTONIGHT
Mass Meeting in Hill Auditorium Will
Inaugurate Attempt to Raise
Money for Field Work
MILITARY TRAINING UNITS TO
MARCH BEHIND VARSITY BAND
Dr. F. W. Gunsaulus to Tell of "Y's"
Need for $3,000,000 to Aid in
War Work
When at the command of "Squads
right-'march!" the assembled bat-
talions swing into line behind the
band at 7:30 o'clock tonight for the
march to Hill auditorium, the "Y"
campaign will have formally begun.
Although the mass meeting is in-
tended to arouse the enthusiasm of the
numerous students taking military
training, and who will benefit by the
projected work of the Y. M. C. A. in
training camp and in the field, provis-
ion has been made for several thou-
sand others who are interested in the
campaign. Dr. F. W. Gunsaulus of
Chicago will address the meeting, out-
lining the plan of the Y. M. C. A. to
raise a country-wide offering of $3,-
000,000 for the purpose of meeting the
needs of the organization in its war-
time work. No collection or pledges
will be taken at the' meeting.
Will Sing "America"
The singing of the national anthem,
and of "America" will form an im-
pressive part of the program. At 7
o'clock the band will assemble at the
corner of State and Washington
streets.
The following companies will form
on Washington street between State
and Division: Senior engineers (E. M.
E. battalion) under Captains Franks,
Dieterich, and Anderson; junior en-
gineers under Captain Montelius;
soph engineers under Captains Scher-
mer, Schmook, and Lowrey; freshmen
under Captain Lyons. The senior
medics will follow under Captain
Jones, juniors under Captain Daniell,
sophs under Captain Novy, and fresh-
men under Captains Ireland and Smith.
The laws under Captains McDonald
and Hudson will .form on Washington
between Division and Fifth; as will all
other men not in the above organiza-
tions. Signs will also indicate the
positions to be occupied.
Tells of Life on Border
At- the banquet held last night in
Lane hall, final instructions were is-
sued to fraternity representatives and
team captains. Rev. Roy Hamilton
acted as chairman, while C. H. John-
son graphically described the condi-
tions at the Mexican border.
The campaign virtually starts at the
close of the meeting tonight, but a
banquet will be held at 5:45 o'clock
tomorrow night in Lane hall, for gen-
eral discussion among the 250 repre-
sentatives of the Y. M. C. A. and the
Y. W. C. A. On this occasion the Rev.
G. W. Knepper will relate his experi-
ences as "Y" worker during the Span-
ish-American war.
Women to Help in W. E. B. Campaign
Final instructions to women serv-
ing on committees to work on the W.
E. B. campaign beginning today, will
be given at a supper tomorrow in
Newberry hall, About 125 women will
help in canvassing the town to reach
the $7,000 goal which has been set by
the Y. M. C. A.

Dean J. R. Effinger Lectures on Play
Dean John R. Effinger will deliver
the last of the series of Cercle
Francais lectures Tuesday afternoon
at 5 o'clock in Tappan hall. His sub-
ject will be Victorien Sardou's "Les
Pattes de Mouche," to be presented by
the Cercle next Thursday evening in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall.

Send 4000 Alumni
Day liwita lions
Event to Be Held May 2; Program to
Include Discussions on Col-
lege Problems
Four thousand letters, urging
alumni of the University to attend the
first annual Alumni day, to be held
May 2, will be sent out by President
Harry B. Hutchins within the next
few days. With each letter will be
enclosed a program of the activities
to be held on Alumni day.
The program is as follows:
8 to 9 o'clock-Registration in the
alumni office, Memorial hall.
9 -to 11 o'clock-Visiting classes by
alumni.
11 to 12:15 o'clock-Conference on
general University problems, at which
deans of the various colleges and
members of the faculty will speak.
12:30 to 2 o'clock-Luncheon at
Barbour gymnasium, with President
Hutchins presiding. Talks will be
given by Mr. Stuart Perry, '94-'96L,
Mrs. Charles W. Hills, '96-'97L, and
Regent W. H. Sawyer, '84.
2 to 2:45 o'clock-Inspection of Uni-
versity buildings, including the science
exhibit, etc.
3:45 to 5 o'clock-Conference on
specific problems, in lecture room,
Natural Science building, at which
addresses will be given by members
of the faculty and alumni, relating to
the work and problems of the Uni-
versity.
LONDON AWAITING NEW
SMASH BY H9tS FORCES

TRAININSGICMP BUANKS
GIVEN' OUT TOMORROW
APPLICANTS MUST TAKE PRELIM.
INARY PHYSICAL EX-
AMINATIONS
Application blanks for admittance
to the officers' reserve training camps,
which will open May 8, may be ob-
tained at the bureau of military in-

WAR TO CHANE SYSTEM
Of BRITISH EDUCATION
ENGLAND TO FOLLOW IN STEPS
OF FRANCE AND GERMANY
SAYS PROF. DEWEY
"One of the first after effects of the
war will be a reorganization of Eng-
land's educational system," was the
prediction of Prof. John Dewey of

BALFOUR AND ALLY COMMISSIO0N
LAND "SOMEWHERE IN AMERICA'
BRINGING SERIOUS IEWIOf wl

formation in Alumni Memorial hall to- I Columbia university in his lecture,

morrow.
Three letters of recommendation
must accompany these applications.
The letters should be from citizens of
good standing, who can speak for the
character, personality, and reputation
of the applicant. Previous military
experience is not necessary, although,
all things being equal, preference will
be given to men who have had train-
ing.
It will be necessary for each man
to take a preliminary physical exam-
ination before sending in his letters
and blank. This examination will be
made in Ann Arbor by local physic-
ians. The report of this test will be
sent in with the application, and will
in large measure determine whether
the man will be allowed to take the
second examination.
The second test will be given by a
regular army officer, and will be rigor-
ous in its requirements. The student
must pass this examination satisfac-
torily, and be accepted as to character
and personality before he will be ad-
mitted to the camp.
ONE-FIFTH OF OHIO STATE'S
AGGIES RESIGN FROM COLLEGE
Columbus, Ohio, April 21.-One-fifth
of the students in the college of agri-
culture of Ohio State university have
withdrawn since Wednesday to take
up farm work. Several men have
withdrawn from other departments
for the same purpose. The office of
the secretary has been crowded with
applicants for their credits, but many
have been refused them because of de-
ficient scholarship. One county agent
in Ohio has informed the head af the
college of agriculture that 2,000 men
are needed in his county alone for
farm work.
Redlands ~U. ex-President Speaks
J. N. Field, founder and first presi-
dent of the University of Redlands,
Calif., will speak on "The Investment
of a Life," at the morning service of
the First Baptist church today. Mr.
Field is now on a speaking tour of
the country, and recently spoke in
New York.
Naval Militia Presented with Bibles
Members of the eighth division of
the Michigan Naval Militia were yes-
terday presented with hand book edi-
tions of the New Testament by the
Phillathea class of the First Baptist

"Education for Democracy," delivered
last night in the auditorium of the
Natural Science building.
Professor Dewey showed that Ger-
many after her defeat by Napoleon
reorganized her educational system as
a means of preparedness. France did
likewise after her defeat in the Franco-
Prussian war. "England," he said,
"has proved the exception because of
her numerous civil and religious
strifes."
Individualism Suppressed
"We have never seriously considered
what kind of a public education is an
indispensible requisite to a country'
that plans to be a democracy. We have
assumed that the traditional methods
of education peculiar to past ages and
forms of government can be retained
in a democracy.
"Our modern democracy is a product
of the industrial revolution. Indi-
vidualism is suppressed. The days of
the pioneer are gone. We must reor-
ganize our educational system to meet
the new conditions.
"Labor today is riot looked upon as
a commodity as in the past, but as
mechanical energy in which the
psychological element enters as well
as the physical. The tendency of the
modern industrial system is to sup-
press individual imagination, initia-
tive, and ambition.
System in Two Parts
"Our educational system is divided
into two parts. On the one hand we
have that cultural education which is
purely ornamental and reminiscent of
the past, while on the other hand we
have the modern technical or voca-
tional education intended to only
sharpen the tools of our industrial
machine and which puts the humani-
tarian and social side in the back
ground.
"Both are dangerous to our de-
mocracy. The educational system of
the future must lay stress on the so-
cial end of life. We must train our
youths in the universities so that when
they go out into the world they will
be equipped to undertake the constant
reconstruction in our social and eco-
nomic life necessary in a growing de-
mocracy."
Mack Made Students' Directory Editor
Gordon C. Mack, '18, was appointed
managing editor and George L. Ohs-
strom, '18, business manager, of the
Students' Directory at the meeting

BRITISI
BRAI;

OFFENSIVE NEARS CAM-
DRIVE WEDGE SOUTI[
OF LENS

London, April 2.-Fleld Marshal
Haig rolled his war machine closer to
Cambrai today, and pushed his steel
wedge still further southwest of Lens.
London tonight waited for Haig to
take his turn at smashing the Germans
all along the line next week. Not that
the British forces have not been stead-
ily progressing during the present
week; but experts pointed out that
during the past 40 odd days since the
British offensive started, the Franco-
British plan of strategy has been ap-
parently to alternate blows on the
Hindenburg line.
The French now have been at it
since Monday, and in that time Haig
has been consolidating his newly won
positions, here and there forging
aherd. The Freneb, far to the south,
kept the Germans too busily on the
del eisive to permit of much strength
in their deeperate counter attacks
against the British.
First Fresh Lit Drill Draws 100
About a hundred fresh lits were out
to drill yesterday afternoon, this be-
ing the first drill since the organiza-
tion of their new military board.
The board is now forming a fife
and drum corps to liven up the drills
and every members of the class that
can play either a fife or a drum is
asked to come out to the next drill.
Drills will be held regularly every
Monday and Friday afternoon at 4
o'clock, and every Wednesday evening
at 7 o'clock. The place of meeting
will be Waterman gymnasium.
Neumann Leaves for Philadelphia
Announcement of the engagement of
John W. Neumann, '17E, to Miss
Martha Wilcox of Detroit was made
during the spring vacation. Neumann
left yesterday morning for Philadel-
phia where he was called by Prof. J.
H. Rowen, formerly of the mechanical
engineering department, to work in
the navy yards.
Kansas University to Retain Athletics
Lawrence, Kan., April 21.-Kansas
will retain intercollegiate athletics for
the balance of the year.

LAW AND ENGINEER
COMPANIES DRILL
Squad and Company Work Covered;
T. F. McDonald and H. F. '
Montellus Captains
Two companies, each containing
eight squads of men, one company
from the Law school and the other
consisting of junior engineers, spent
yesterday afternoon in drilling on
Ferry field.
The company from the Law school
spent the time in practicing company1
drill under the leadership of Actingl
Captain T. F. McDonald, '17L. Theyc
formed in front of the Law school att
1:30 o'clock and marched down toJ
Ferry field, remaining until 4:30f
o'clock.
The junior engineers were put
through their paces by Acting Captaint
H. F. Montelius, '18E. Instead of com-
pany formation they spent their timer
in squad drill, the men in the engi-
neering college planning to keep to
the fundamentals for at least two
weeks, before they start on the more
difficult processes of company and bat-
talion formation.
SOCIAMSTPARTYT FLAYS
GERMANY'SGOERNMENT
RESOLUTIONS CALL FOR PARLIA-
MENTARY RULE IN TEU-
TON REALM
By John Grandens
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)i
Berlin, via London, April 21.-Re-i
placement of "the bureaucratic
regime" by "parliamentary control"<
was demanded in resolutions adoptedt
by the general committee of the0so-
-cialist party here today.
"We confirm the decision of the
workers of Germany to emerge from
the war as a free state," the resolu-
tions asserted. "We demand the re-
moval of all inequalities and the re-1
placement of the bureaucratic regime
by parliamentary control. We rejectE
the entente's declaration that a con-'
tinuation of the war is necessary to1
force Germany to establish a liberal
regime. It is the German people's own
affair."
Austrian socialists in attendance at
the meeting likewise approved these
resolutions.
W. K. TOWERS, '10-'12L, TALKS
TO JOURNALISTS TUESDAY
Walter Kellogg Towers, '10-'12L,
managing editor of the American Boy
magazine, will address all students
interested in journalism at 4 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon in room 202 West
hall. The address will be given under
the auspices of Pi Delta Epsilon, up-
percass honorary journalistic frater-
nity.
Mr. Towers was managing editor of
The Daily during '11-'12, and has been
with the American Boy Publishing
company as assistant and managing
editor for the last five years. Mr. Ly-
man Bryson of the rhetoric department
will preside over the meeting.
Cornell Men Take Over Night March
Ithaca, N. Y., April 21.-More than
400 undergraduates and members of
the faculty left here this afternoon on
an overnight march and camp under
the direction of the department of mil-
itary science and tactics. The men left
Ithaca fully equipped, and will encamp

under conditions of actual combat at
Esty and Rogues Harbor. The battal-
ion will return Sunday evening.

IE A I) OF C0OM1iTEE

M

131 PR ESSIVE REMARKS
. ON SITUATION.
ASTONISHED AT IDEA OF
NO U. S. MEN IN EUROPE
Emphasizes Fact That War Will be
of Long Duration; Pleased at
Union of Two Countries
By George Martin
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
"Somewhere in the United States,"
April 21.--Spirited out of England and
ushered into America under a cloak
of mystery, the British war commis-
sion, headed by Secretary Arthur J.
Balfour, arrived in this country today
to tell it how it can help to win the.
war.
.5carcely had the cheers and waving
of flags at the rural village at the point
of reception faded into the prospective
and the gold braided officers of the
army, navy, and air corps disappeared
into their staterooms, when the tall,
slender form of Balfour appeared per-
sonally to tell his first message to the
.American people. Summed up it was
this:
War Intenself' Serious
"Realize, people of America, that
you face a real fight, and be prepared
for the great individual sacrifice, for
it will be demanded."
Almost the first .act of the British
minister as he and his party of 20
boarded the train which is now speed-
ing toward the waiting American war
councellors at Washington was to ex-
plode the theory that this country
faces a short, bloodless war. Balfour
made it clear that it will be long that
it will tax our resources of men, that
it will requiresall we have of financial
strength, that it will command all our
commercial and industrial energy,
that it will involve the individual ef-
fort of every true American.
Balfour to Help
"We have come to help America
turn the first page in a new chapter
in the history of mankind," the tall,
snowy haired diplomat said smilingly
but earnestly. "The United States
does not yet realize all it will be call-
ed upon to do, and what we know it
will do. Time will bring the war home
to you as it has done to us.'
"But," it was suggested, "there is
an impression that we will be called
upon to do nothing but make muni-
tions and build ships."
Balfour's expression showed clear-
ly that he was astonished. After a
pause he said significantly:
"You shall see. I appreciate that it
will be quite a little time before the
people of the United States thoroughly
realize what they are 'up against' to
borrow an American phrase, and I
am quite sure that when Germany
forced the United States into war with
her, she did not realize what she was

church of Detroit. One of the men of j held Friday afternoon by the board
the division is a member of the church. in control of student publications.

Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division Streets
10:30 A. M. Leonard A. Barret
Speaks-Theme-The Ideal Government
Noon. Major C. E. Wilson
Speaks to University Bible Class

First Methodist Church
A. W. Stalker, D. D., Minister
10:30 A. M.---The Rev. Dr. J. T. B. Smith,
of Chicago

'up against'.
No Public Talk Yet
''No public expression df opinion on
points of policy would be useful or
tolerable until I have had the honor
of conferring with your president and
learniig his views. I have come here
to do what I can to make co-operation
easy and effective between those who
are striving with all their power to
bring about a lasting peace by the only
means that can secure it: namely, a
successful war.
"On my own behalf let me express
the deep gratification I feel at being
connected in any capacity whatever
with events which associate our
countries in a common effort for a
great ideal. On behalf of my country-
men let me express our gratitude for
all that the citizens of the United
States of America have done to miti-
gate the lot of those who, in allied
(Continued on Page Six)

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BIG

MASS

MEETING

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7

Y

HILL AUDITORIUM, SUNDAY 7:30
DR. GUNSAULUS SPEAKS
THE BAND AND ALL THE ORGANIZED DRILL COMPANIES WILL BE THERE

y

W E. B

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