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April 20, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-20

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THE WEATHER
RAIN AND COLDER
TODAY

g Sitr 43""

4:Iait~

UNITED PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVIL No. 138.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 20, 1917.

r

EN IN TRAINING
CAMPS GT CREDIT
Students Joining Officers' Reserve
Corps Passed if Work Is Sat-
isfactory Now
MICHIGAN SENDS TROOPS TO
FORT SHERIDAN, ILLINOIS
Age Limit Between 21 Years Nine
Months and 44
Years
Students leaving school to join one
of the officers' reserve corps training
camps which will open May 8 will be
given full credit for the semester pro-
vided their work is satisfactory at the
time of leaving, according to the state-
ment of Mr. Philip E. Bursley of the
French department, who is in charge
of the information bureau in Alumni
Memorial hall. This rule also applies
to students joining any branch of the
service.
Fort Sheridan Camp for Michigan
Fort Sheridan will be the location
of the camp for this section of the
country, but there will be 13 other
camps established in various parts of
the country. Men from Michigan,
Illinois, and Wisconsin will enter at
Fort Sheridan. Those who live in
other states are urged to enter the
camp which is in their district. The
maximum attendance will be limited
to 2,500, owing to the shortage of
regular army officers to take charge
of the training.
Application blanks may be obtained
by writing to the commanding general
of the central department of the United
States army, Federal building, Chi-
cago. Mr. Bursley advises those who
wish to get in on these camps to write
immediately as the time is limited.
Any additional information regarding
these camps may be secured from the
same source.
Prepare to Pay Own Expenses
Those who go to the camp must be
prepared to buy their own uniforms
and to pay their own expenses, as no
provision has yet been made for this
by the war department.' It is likely
that the government will make pro-
vision for these needs, but no definite
action has been taken and it is well
for the applicant to be prepared to de-
fray these expenses.
A total of 10,000 officers will be
needed. Men who have had military
training or experience as leaders will,
be given preference. Army authorities
believe the camps will turn out this'
number of officers by the middle of
July and these will be used for serv-
ice with the first 500,000 men. These
men must be the best that the coun-
try can produce.
The minimum age of those who at-
tend is fixed at 20 years and nine
┬░ionths. Thus a man entering now will
be old enough to receive a commis-
sion at the end of the three months
of training. The maximum age is fixed
at 44 years.
INTERNED GERMANS
BATTLE BRAZILIANS

Major Castle to
Arrive on Monday
Will Determine Nature of Courses to
Be Given After Consultation
with President Hutchins
Major Charles W. Castle, the army
officer who has been detailed here
by the war department to fill the chair
of military science, will arrive in Ann
Arbor some time next Monday, accord-
ing to a telegram sent by the major'
to President Harry B. Hutchins yes-
terday.
Nothing definite as to the training
and courses to be given by Major
Castle has been decided as yet, but
this will be determined after his ar-
rival, when he will hold conferences
with the president and other Uni-
versity authorities.
Major Castle will have his offices in
Waterman gymnasium.
FIGHTING INTENSIFIED
ALONG 40 MILE FRONT

SUN AND
AS

SNOW BLIND GERMANS
FRENCH TROOPS
ADVANCE

By Wood (initials not given), with
the French Armies in the Field, April
19.--Fighting was increasing in in-
tensity today over a front of more
than 40 miles.
A morning sun reflected in dazzling
brightness on a snow covered ground
aided the French in one of the most
brilliant . advances yet made. The
ground thus taken is now firmly in
French hands with the troops pushing
on further ahead. This battle in the
snows was between Rheims and St.
Souplet Teusday. The advance of the
French was so swift that within 50
minutes after leaping from their
trenches they had occupied all Ger-
man positions for two-thirds of a mile
ahead, advancing more than a mile in
an hour.
An effective artillery fire from the
French guns aided in this, but the
snow contributed to the victory. Its
whiteness hid the infantry's advance,
blinding the eyes of the German
watchers.
AUSTRIAN MINISTERS
QUIT, SAYS ZEITUNG
Amsterdam Reports Resignation of
Two Pro=German
Members
Copenhagen, April 19.-The entire
Austrian cabinet has resigned, accord-
ing to the Berlin Vossiche Zeitung this
afternoon. Amsterdam advices yester-
day stated that two pro-German mem-
bers of the cabinet had resigned.

OPPORTUNITY FOR FARM
WORK GIVEN STUDENTS
ARRANGEMENTS WILL BE MADE
WITH FARMERS FOR
EXTRA HELP
Students who wish to work on farms
rather than do military work in the
present war crisis may secure posi-
tions through the Ann Arbor Civic as-
sociation, which is acting as a clear-
ing house between the farmers around
Ann Arbor and the people of the city
who care to help in the patriotic move-
ment by increasing the food supply of
Ann Arbor.
Questionnaries have been printed by
the association asking the name of
the applicant, address, age, telephone
number, present occupation, experi-
ence in farming, available time, and
what transportation facilities the ap-
plicant has. These cards may be ob-
tained at the secretary's office in the
University Y. M. C. A. or in the Civic
association's rooms in the city hall.
These cards will be given to the
farmers who have promised to co-op-
erate in employing the applicants.
They will pay them the usual rate for
farm laborers. The rate to be paid
will be fixed according to the previous
experience of the worker and to the
actual work of the applicant.
PLAN FAREWELL FOR
NAVAL MILITIAMEN
Date for Exercises to Be Set When
Order to Entrain
Arrives
Farewell exercises have been
planned for the Seventh and Eighth
divisions of the Michigan naval militia,
the date for which will be set as soon
as the order to entrain arrives.
The exercises will take place in Hill
auditorium where President Harry B.
Hutchins will preside. The speakers
on this occasion will be Dean M. E.
Cooley, former Mayor Walz, and form-
er Secretary of the Navy Truman B.
Newberry, now of Detroit. The Varsity
band will also make its appearance.
It has been found necessary to limit
the attendance to ticket holders, but
reservations have been made for Com-
pn" I of the M. N. G., the Spanish
War Veterans, the G, A. R., and the
Women's Relief corps. Citizens may
procare their tickets at local banks,
while students may secure theirs at
the Michigan Union.
Professor A. A. Stanley of the School
of Music has set to music a "Hymn of
Consecration," the words of which
are by Oliver Wendell Holmes, which
will be sung at this time by Theodore
Harrison of the School of Music.
SELL PROM TICKETS
Sophomores Get Pasteboards at Union
Today
Soph prom tickets will go on sale
at the Union desk at 2:30 o'clock to-
day. But 115 tickets will be sold, and
they may be purchased only by sopho-
mores. The price of the tickets are
$3.00. The dance will be held at the
Armory, May 11.
V. W. ELLSWORTH TO SPEAK
ON PUBLISHING EXPERIENCES
"Forty Years of Publishing" is the
subject of an address to be delivered
at 4 o'clock today in room 205 N. W.,
by W. W. Ellsworth, ex-president of
the Century Publishing company. Mr.

Ellsworth is one of the best known
lecturers in the country, and the de-
lightful manner with which he re-
counts his reminiscences, the results
of his many years of experience, is
said to have made him a favorite with
his audiences.
The lecture will be given under the
auspices of the department of jour-
nalism, but all interested in the sub-
ject are invited to attend.

Y .MCIA SEEKS FUNDS
FOR WARND BUSRHH
111 YSTERY ADVERTISING STARTS
CAMPAIGN TO RAISE
$7,000
The mystery has been solved .
Windows, placards, and handbills
bearing their glaring "7's" and "Y's"'
which have excited much comment
upon the campus have been found to
presage the opening of a hugh cam-
paign by the student Y. M. C. A to
raise the sum of $7,000 beginning next
Sunday evening and lasting for three
days. Three thousand dollars of this
sum will go toward organizing the
work of the association at the many
army and navy training camps soon to
be established by the government.
Fifteen hundred dollars is asked for
the maintainance of the medical mis-
sion at Busrah, India. Twenty-five
hundred dollars will be used for furth-
er equipping Lane hall and for assist-
ign the work of the Y. W. C. A.
Scope of Campaign Like Spiders' Web
The entire campaign plan is novel,
as devised by those who have it in
hand. The horrors of war have been
likened to a huge spider that is spin-
ning its web over the country, to com-
bat which much of the money will be
used. The initial letters of War. Ex-
pense, and Busrah are symbolical of
this, while the progress of the cam-
paigh will be indicated by bulletins,
showing a spider ascending his web
toward the central goal.
Both in Mexico and on European
battlefields, the Y. M. C. A. has erected
buildings for the recreation of the
mnen at the front, and proposes contin-
uing the work within the United
States, providing such a building and
equipment for each brigade of 5,280
men soon to be called to the colors.
Thr. n.in dollars will be collect-
ed to meet expenses for the. coming
year. The plan of the Christian asso-
ciation has met with the hearty ap-
proval of naval and military author-

TO EDUCATE
POTATOES
Lawrence, Kan., April 19. -
Potatoes and garden truck in-
stead of grass may be grown on
the University of Kansas cam-
pus this summer if the present
plans of the chancellor are fol-
lowed. Conservation of food re-
sources will be the cause.
Draw Ripper Will
To Oust Couzens
Forfeits New Job by Not Resigning
Old Position in 10
Days
Lansing, April 19.-James Couzens,
former general manager of the Ford
Motor company, and now the million-
aire police commissioner of Detroit, is
only the de facto head of the Detroit
police department, it was charged in
a resolution introduced today by Rep-
resentative Sheridan Ford.
The resolution made claim that
Couzens did not resign from the state
mediation committee within 10 days
of his appointment as police commis-
sioner, which caused him to forfeit his
new job automatically. Ford said the
police department is demoralized, and
that he had been asked to draw up a
"ripper" bill to rip Couzens out of his
job.
MOR CASTLE NOT TO
CHANGE__RILL PILANS
ENGINEERS TO WORK AS BEFORE
DECLARES MAJOR
WILSON
Work in the College of Engineering
along organization and drill of the
students will probably be undisturbed
with the arrival of Major Castle, was
the opinion of Major C. E. Wilson yes-
terday, in regard to the work done by
the military committee of the college
in allowing men to drop all classes
coming between 4 and 7 o'clock on
Tuesdays and Fridays and substitut-
ing drill instead.
The organization by classes creates
a greater spirit, was the idea expressed
by Major Wilson when he said that
out of the entire class of the senior
mechanical engineers only three mem-
bers are not in the military organiza-
tion. These members are of foreign
birth.
About 125 pans are exp A to be
available for the use of the corps soon.
Some of these guns will be secured in
Ann Arbor while the remainder will
be procured in Detroi.
One of the things contributing to the
great number of men enrolled in the
engineering army is the fact that all
students enrolled in the course given
in elements of military engineering
are compelled to take the drill to be
given on Tuesdays and Fridays.

PRICE FIVE CENTS
REPORT FAVORAL
TO U. S, SENATE ON
SELECTIVE SYSTEM
31UST MOBILIZE PRODUCTIVE AND
ACTIVE FORCES FOR CO-
OPERATION-WILSON
VOLUNTEER METHOD
SAID INEFFECTUAL
Bill Provides for Force of 600,000 to
Fill Regular Army and
Guard Units
By Robert J. Bender
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Washington, April 19.-While the
house played politics with the admin-
istration's land defense plans for rais-
ing a selective conscript army, the
senate late this afternoon received
from Chairman Chamberlain of the
military committee a favorable report
on President Wilson's bill.
The Chamberlain report denounced
the volunteer system as inadequate,
extravagant, and ineffectual. It point-
ed out that the army is needed quickly
if the nation is to be defended prop-
erly, and is larger than any ever asked
for under a volunteer system. The
argument of President Lincoln used
during the Civil war in support of the
draft system was quoted in the con-
cluding passages of the report.
Provides for Volunteers
Discussing the bill, Senator Cham-
berlain said, "While this measure es-
tablishes selective conscription as a
means of raising an army, it leaves
room for the operation of so much of
the volunteer system as, in our judg-
ment, is worthy of adoption. It pro-
vides for a force of 600,000 volunteers
for tilling the regular army and na-
tional guard units to' wr time
strength." The house today passed
the administration bill raising the elig-
ible age limit for officers of the naval
reserves from 35 to 50 years in order
to get into the service many merchant
ship officers. The house also passed
a bill to increase the number of naval
offiirers in the hydrographic office.
Explains Selective Draft
In a letter to Representative Helver-
ing of Kansas, President Wilson out-
lined in detail why he believes the se-
lective draft is preferable to the old
volunteer system.
The letter follows:
"My Dear Mr. Ilelvering: I wel-
comed the inquiry of your letter of
April 19 because I have realized the
truth of what you say from my own
observation, namely, that what' is
meant to be understood by the selec-
tive draft is not generally understood
throughout the country. The process
of the draft is, I think, very clearly
set forth in the bill drafted by the war
department, which I so earnestly hope
the congress will adopt, but it is worth
while to state the idea which under-
lies the bill a little more fully.
Many Kinds of Service
"I took occasion the other day in
an address to the people of the coun-
try to point out the many forms of
patriotic service that were open to
t' em and to emphasize the fact that
the military part of the service was
by no means the only part, and per-
haps, all things considered, not the
most vital part. Our object is a mobil-
izantinr of the productive and active

forces of the nation, and their develop-
ment to the highest point of co-opera-
tion and efficiency. The idea of the
selective draft is that men should be
chosen for service in the army who
can be most readily spared from the
pi osecution of the other activities
which the country must engage in,
and to which it must devote a great
deal of its best energy and capacity.
"The volunteer system does not do
this. When men choose themselves,
they sometimes choose without due re-
(Continued on Page Six)

ities.
Busrah Fund Decreased

This Year

SLEEPER

SIGNS

BILL

Fight Ends With Loss of Life
Both Sides, According
to Report

on

Rio de Janiero, April 19.-A fight
between a number of Brazilian sailors
and a group of German seamen from
interned German liners resulted in
some loss of life,,according to official
announcement today.
A number of both sides were wound-
ed. Dispatches from Porto Alegre to-
day said the city was still in great
disorder after the riot and fires start-
ed Monday night.
Round-Ip Club Holds Dinner Dance
The Round-Up club will hold a
formal' dinner dance at the Michigan
Union at 7:30 o'clock tonight.

Hospital Given $350,000 Appropriation
by State
Governor Albert E. Sleeper has
signed the hospital appropriation bill
for the University, giving to the Uni-
versity $350,000 to be used for rhos-
pital purposes and improvements. The
details as to how the money will be
expended have not been settled defi-
nitely as yet.
FRESH LITS WILL MEET TO
DISCUSS MILITARY TRAINING
There will be an assembly of the
male members of the fresh lit class
this afternoon in University Hall, at
4 o'clock, for the purpose of organizing
a military board to take care of the
military activities of the freshman
class.
Among the other business to be
transacted is the electing of a base-
ball manager.

Owing to the fact that the mission
at Buzrah has virtually come under
active British control, the budget for
the coming year has been considerably
decreased, although the need is said
to be as great as ever. The annual
subscriptions to its support will this
year be solicited with the funds
sought for the training camps. Dr.
N. G. Van 'Vlack, '10, has recently
returned to this country after six
years spent in the plague infested re-
gion, and will be in Ann Arbor next
week to inspire the student body dur-
ing the campaigning.
Lane hall, erected at a cost of $125,-
000 by alumni and friends, is seeking
to extend its library, provide musical
enterta' ment in the form of pianos
and vicrola, equip a motion picture
machine, and to maintain its religious
and social service work on the cam-
pus for the coming year. Newberry
hall will also be provided for out, of
the fund.
Many members of the faculty have
volunteered their support and numer-
ous speakers will make their ap -
pearance to aid the work. Teams of
Y. M. C. A. workers will make a
thorough house to house canvass of
the city, the captains of which will
meet each evening during the cam-
paign to report progress.
PROF. APPELBOOM,LECTURES
THIS AFTERNOON ON HOLLANDi
Prof. A. F. P. Appelboom of the
University of Kansas, will deliver a
lecture on "Holland and Its People," ill
room A, Alumni Memorial hall at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon.
Professor Appelboom will speak
under the auspices of the University,
and in the interests of the Dutch peo-
ple of the state who are endeavoring
to raise funds for the establishment
of a chair in Dutch literature in the
University. No admission fee will be
charged.

SHOOT

Thoifght to Be Plot to Blow Up Pow-
der Train Crossing
Trenton, N. J., April 19.-Shots
from ambush early today wounded
Robert Price, '18, a private in the Sec-
ond New Jersey regiment, while guard-
ing a railroad bridge at Yardville on
the outskirts of Trenton.
Price is in a critical conition at
St. Francis' hospital here.
It is believed it was the intention of
his assailants to blow up the bridge
after shooting the sentry. Powder
trains from South Jersey plants cross
the structure enroute to New- York
harbor.

MILITIAMEN

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$7,000 - - THE GOAL SET BY THE Y. M. C. A. AND Y. W. C. A. - - $7,000
V.U AR WORK QUIPMENT, Lane Hall B USRAH
WW U.S. Army & Navy "Y" XPjNewb'ryHallMichigan Medical
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HELP THE SPIDER SPIN

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