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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 18, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'HE MICH]

UV IJAm

I/ie Largest A ssartment
E fine woolens in the city is here for your inspection. We think you'll
gree that never have you seen classier fabrics. Tailored in our in-
nitable style in a suit to your measure, they will make you as smartly
ressed as any man in town.

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi-- gan. I'ut fished every morning except
M.nday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
iecond-class matter.

G. H.
Merchant Tailors

Wild Company .
STATE STREET

I

Rackets Restriung
THKEE DAYS TIME
rices from $1.75 to $3.75 ALL WORK GUARANTEED
rho Stater BookShop
hone 430 336 S. State St.

Bicycles
renuis
Rackets
Base Ball
Goods
Lawn Mowers

Switzers'
Hardware

Bicycle 41
Repairing
Key FittivgU
Razor Blade
Sharpening

310 State
Only Hardware
Near Campus

,i

ANNOUNCEMENT

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

Gives- you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

0

106 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

- q

We Offer You
SECURITY- -SERVICE - -LOCATION
Resources $3,Soo0,OOO

Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated1864

I:

Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office--
707 North University Ave.
e Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Bankhig
SECURITY-. - EFFICIENCY
ivenient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
Pleased With Our Service. Two Offices
-105 . Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
et a typewriter from
4. D. MORRILL
322 South Stute Street
will furnish you an instruction
ok free of charge. You will be a
)ist before you know it.
PLAIN.
HOP SUEY 30c,
FRIED RICE, (plain), 25c
At All Times
Everyday have Fresh Home-
Made Hot Rolls served here-2
Rolls and Butter-5c.
Open 11 A. )L to 1A. M.
ichigan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 948-R

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run', on P~asterni tin),, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars---7:35 a.
mn., 8:io a i. and hourly to 7:1o P. in., 9:10
p). mrr.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. Ih and
every two hours to 6:48 p. m.;.to Lansing,
8:48 p. In.,
Jackson Express Cars -(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)--9:4s a. m, and every two hours
to 7.:48 P. iM.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:40 a
in., 79:: a. m.. and every two hours to 7:05 P
Mn., 8:05 P. in., 9:05 p. Tn., 10 :50 p. tn. tc
Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. m., 9:50 a. m., 2:05 p
a. M. o Saline,"change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound -6:os a. iM., 7:50 a
n. o :2 y. im.. xazosaa mn
Twenty-two remarkable photo-
graphs of the Greek Play. Come
in and see them.
713 E. UNIVERSITY
w Alarm Clocks
iNLANR EERE $1.00 up
Fountain Pens-
Waterman and Conklin
U. of M. Jewelry
Schlanderer & Seyfried
MODERNS SHOP
0A DR332 State St.

Oftwes. Ann Abor Press Building. Sub
scriptions: by carrier $2.50; by mail, $3.00
Want ad. stations: Qrr uarry'; Students' Sp
ply Store; The .Delta, cor. State and Packad
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 244.
Communications not to exceed 30o words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock eac
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh.....Busnsess Manager
Conrad N. Churn.......y..News Fditor
Lee 1, Joslyn ........... ....... City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgeala..........Sports Fditor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editnr
Marian Wilson..............Women's Editor
Leonard W. Nicter..ss't Telegraph ditor
Deorrest S. Rood.........xchange Editor
J. E. Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip 4iery. .Assistant Business Manage
Albert E. Horne..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Ra....Assistant Business Manage
Fred M. Sutter. .Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
C. M. Jickling NI. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney J. . Stadeker
L. S. Thompson E. L. Zeigler
I. C. Garrison
Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schermerhorn, Jr.
R. H1. Fricken G. 0. Broph
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R. T. McDonald
C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul I. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilsonn
Walter R. Payne Bernard Wohli
WEDNEDAY, APRIL 18, 1917.
Night Editor--C. S. Clark Jr.
WITH THE GUN, THE THIMBLE, OR
THE HOE,
The line which separates Americans
w.p will wear uniforms of the army or
navy from those who do not is not the
line of demarcation separating those
who take active part in the war from
the slackers wno will remain passive.
President Wilson's powerful message
to the Amehican people clearly
brought out the fact that placing the
army and navy on a war footing was
only one of the enormous tasks con-
fronting this country in converting its
resources into efficient fighting units.
There will be many at Michigan who
for different reasons will not be able
or be qualified to go to the front, but
there is not one of us who cannot en-
list in the great army of national ser-
vice. Many more will be needed in
agricultural and industrial activities
than on the firing line.-
At present definite war policies have
not been decided by congress, com-
plete organization has not been effect-
ed. A cloud of indefiniteness hangs
over the military and naval plans, and
every branch of activity of war pre-
paration. But awaiting more decisive
action there are hundreds of things
that individuals may discover to do
and act upon voluntarily. Women of
the University, already engaged in ac-
tive work for the Red Cross, saw an
opportunity to help in the work of the
intelligence bureau, and have co-oper-
ated with the Michigan Union in this
valuable service.
Let us be on the lookout for some
way in which to aid the government
whether it be with the gun, the thim-
ble, or the hoe.
PLEASE!
"Please!"
These little signs which you have
seen around the campus are requests,
not orders They were put there in the
interest of a neater, more sightly.cam-
pus Already there is complex net-
work of walks laid out with the con-
venience of the students and faculty
in mind. Possibly one or two more
are needed to supply newer short cuts.

If so, they will undoubtedly be built.
But unless it is absolutely necessary,
let the little sign serve as a reminder
to you.
"Please!"
Dartmouth to Drop Junior Promenade
Hanover, N. H., April 17. - Dart-
mouth's junior promenade will not be
held this year, if a resolution sent to
the non-athletic council is passed by
that body. The resoultion urges the
dropping of the event from this year's
activities, owing to its inconsistency
with the general serious tenor of the
times.
Student Enlists as Radio Operator
R. G. Sidnell, '20E, of Cleveland has
enlisted in the United States navy as
a first class radio operator. Sidnell
passed the examinations but has been
allowed to continue his work in the
University until called to active serv-
ice.
Special Discount to Class Baseball
Teams. Cushing's Pharmacy.-Adv.

UNUSUAL PROGRAM TO
BE RENDERED IN MAY
FAMOUS ARTISTS TO APPEAR AT
TIE 24TH ANNUAL MAY
FESTIVAL
Wednesday evening, May 2, will
mark the opening of the twenty-fourth
annual May festival and it is doubtful
i1 a more comparable list of artists
has ever appeared in this city.
Madame Louise Homer, contralto of
the Metropolitan Opera company will
be the soloist for the opening concert
and will be heard in three arias, ac-
companied by the Chicago Symphony
orchestra. This orchestra, conducted
by Frederick Stock, will . play a
Dvorak overture, a Brahms symphony,
and a Dance Rhapsody by Delius, and
Sebelius' symphonic poem, "Fin-
landia."
Choral Union to Sing
Thursday evening the University
Choral Union will sing Elgar's "Dream
of Gerontius," with Morgan Gingston,
tenor; Christine Miller, contralto;
William Wade Hinshaw, bass, and
Gustaf Holmquist, bass, as soloists.
The Chicago Symphony orchestra will
open the program with Wagner's Pre-
lude "Parsifal."
Ethel Leginska, the talented pianist,
will appear Friday afternoon, and will
play Rubenstein's concerto for Piano-
forte No. 4, D minor, Op. 70. The
children's chorus will sing Fletcher's
"The Walrus and the Carpenter," and
the orchestra will present Mozart's
Symphony in C major.
The soloist for the Friday evening
concert will be Amelita Galli-Curci,
lli coloratura sorano, whose success
and rapid rise to popularity has been
phenomenal. This unusual artist will
be heard in three arias. The remainder
of the program will consist of or-
chestral numbers played by the Chi-
cago Symphony orchestra.-
Organ Recital Saturday
The customary organ recital on Sat-
irday afternoon will be given by Rich-
ard Keys Biggs with Mrs. Anna
Schramm-Inig, contralto, as soloist.
It\r. Biggs is a graduate of the Uni-
versity School of Music and has won
a reputation for himself as an organ-
ist. Mrs. Imig is a member of the fac-
ulty of the School of Music and is
familiar to 'music lovers of this city.
Saturday evening the climax of the
entire festival will be reached when
Verdi's "Aida" will be given by the
Choral Union and an all-star operatic
caste of soloists, including Maude Fay
and Lois Johnston, sopranos; Mar-
garete Matzenauer, contralto; Marti-
nelli, tenor; Giuseppe De Luca and
Chase B. Sikes, baritones, and Wil-
liam Wade Hinshaw and Gustaf Holm-
4l ist, bass.
German Orders
Shown in Library
several interesting proclamations,
giving orders from th German com-
manders to the people of the parts of
France and Belgium under German
control, are being exhibited in the
corridor of the Library. These notices
have been translated into English and
bound into a publication called
"Scraps of Paper." Comments are
made showing the cruel methods of
the Germans as revealed in the notices.
Probably the most important docu-
ment of the collection is a notice to
the people of Brussels in which Edith
Cavell and nine others are sentenced
to death for treason to the German
government. Another paper warns

people of Liege that the Germany army
will pass through Belgium, and asks
the inhabitants for free passage
through their country. Another gives
notice that the city of Andennes has
been burned and 110 citizens shot be-
cause of the resistance made to the
German army.
EXPECT DEAN BATES' RETURN
FROM SUMMONS TO CHICAGO
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school, who is adjutantageneral for the
military activities of the University,
is expected to return to Ann Arbor
from Chicago some time today. The
dean left here very hurriedly last
Monday in response to a call from
military officials stationed in that city.
Mr. Starr Speaks at Church of Christ
Mr. Floyd Starr of the Starr Com-
monwealth, is to speak at 8 o'clock to-
night in the Church of Christ under
the auspices of the Girls' Honorary
Educational club of the University.
Mr. Starr's talk will be illustrated by
lantern slides.
An admission fee of ten cents will
be charged.
Add New Iron Railings to Lane Hall
New . wrought iron' railings have

AlI

Sanitary
Dry Ci aning Co.
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
Sumls
Made to Measure
$15 and up
Phone 2225
WL1omen
All tennis tournament lists must be
complete by Friday noon.
Juniors and seniors interested in
baseball report at 4 o'clock today.
Regular gym classes began yester-
day according to schedule.
Upperclassmen who would like posi-
tions as squad-leaders should see Miss
Evans at once.
All girls wishing to work at the
Michigan Union indexing the replies
received from the alumni by the intel-
ligence bureau should sign up for
time with Helen Bates, '18, chairman.
Tickets for the third performance
of the Junior girl's play will be on
sale from 9 to 4 o'clock today, tomor-
row and Thursday, in the general li-
brary and at Dean Myra B. Jordan's
office and Wahr's bookstore.
Mr. Starr of the Starr common-
I wealth. speaks at 8 o'clock this even-
ing in the Church of Christ before an
open meeting of the Girls' Honorary
Educational club.
Y. W. C. A. cabinet meets at 4:15
today in Newberry hall.
Geneva club meets at 5 o'clock to-
day in Newberry hall.
All senior girls are. requested to
come to Barbour gyntnasium Thurs-
day or Friday from 3 to 5 o'clock to
order collars for gowns.
Engineering News
The Technic received a new ship-
ment of Carnegie's during vacation
which are on sale now at the Technic
desk for all those who have receipts.
The sophomore engineering class,
with the help of Major Wilson, have
formed a company which will drill
at 7 o'clock every Tuesday evening in
the gymnasium until+ further notice.
All those who find it impossible to at-
'end the squad on this night can work
with any of the companies of the en-
gineering college on other nights.
The junior engineering class will
assemble today at 4 o'clock in room
348 Engineering building to discuss
plans for the present military organ-
ization of the class and to choose two
days of the week for drilling.
GRAD LECTURES TO TRYADS
ON ADVERTISING, AGENCIES
J. Fred Woodruff, '08, of the Camp-
bell-Ewalt company of Detroit, spoke
to the Tryads last night in rom 162
Natural Science building on "The Ad-
vertising Agency in Modern Business."
The Campbell-Ewalt company is one+
of the largest advertising agencies in
the country and Mr. Woodruff gave the
members of the club much valuable
information on the methods and or-+
ganization of an advertising agency

Rubber
Bathing Caps
40c & 50c
at
QUARRY DRUG CO'S,
Prescription Store
Cor. Seat,& N. University

1

19

ES

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A. J. RUBY
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ARCADE
PHONE 795-r

A Particular Place
for Particular People.

FRANK C. BOLICH, Prop,

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APRIL

D

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0

MR. E. A. PERERSON,
General Manager of The National
Map Company, will be at the
Allenel Hotel on Friday, April
20th, to interview college men
desirous of an unusual proposi-
tion for summer work. Mini-
mum earnings of $300.00 guar-
anteed.
SEE MR. PETERSON

NEW

R

T

CLASS

H

O A
H A M 1 L T O N
BUSINESS COLLECE

S

D

1

For live, progressive, up-to-date ad
ertisiug use The Michigan Daily.
Rugs perfectly cleaned, washed, and
zed without injury. Koch & Henne. ft
There is opportunity in The Michi-
Tn Daily Ada. Read them.

CHIROPOl)Y
lAiss Crans, licensed chiropodist of
Detroit, will be at Mrs. Stoddard's
Hair Shop, from 8:00 till 5:00. Tele-
phone 296-J.-Adv. 18
I can duplicate any lens. J. L.
Cbapmnan, Optrometrist and Jeweler.

Lx tension Lectures
Prof. R. D. T. Hollister will visit
Manistique, Rapid River, Gladstone,
Escanaba, Hermansville, and Stephen-
son while lecturing in the Upper Pen-
insula this week.
Dr. H. C. Laws will speak in Mar-
quette today.
Announce Engagement of Senior Law
Announcement has been made of the
engagement of Ethel P. J3radley, ex-
'14, of Ann Arbor, to Fred S. Flick,
'17L, of Hazleton, Pa.

been added to the front of Lane hall. and its relation to modern business.

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