100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 31, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY

Laster

April 8th

Prepare Now

Make your selection from our vast assortment of distinctive
weaves and colorful blends.

G.H.
Merchant Tailors

Wild Company
STATE STREET

Rackets Restrung
THREE DAYS TIME

from $1.75 to $3.75

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

The Slater BookShopI
Phone 430 336 S. State St.

STOP AT
LTUTTLE'S
. 38 . STATE
for sodas and lunches
GEORGE BISCHOFF
FLORIST
hoicc Cut Flowers and Plants
0 Chapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich
PHONiE 809 M

Special Sale of Cosmetics and Switches
Special Ten Day Weave
BEAUTY SHOP-
Miss Mabel Rowe
Shampooing, Manicuring, Massaging and chiropody
Phone 2402 503 irst National Bank Bldg
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $xoo,ooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo X. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. clarkio Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
IL D. Kinnie

After Your Class

OR ANY TIME, DROP INTO THE
Fountamof Youth
And enjoy one of our Horlick's Originals
or try one of our Delicious Sundaes

w'l. air4anw %ait
Official newspaper at the University of
Mi :agan. Published every morning except
I.sday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2.50; b mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: uarry's; 'tudents' Sup-
lh Store; The Delta, cor .State and Packard
Pthne: Busines, 960; Editorial 414.
Communications not to exceed See words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
ished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:3o o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Edito
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church..............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn.................City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.......ports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson.....Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson..............Women's Editor
tULeonard W. Nieter. . .. Asst Telegraph Editor
DeForrest S. Rood.........Exchange Editor
J.E Cam pbell.. . Asitat :Businss Manager
C. Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert $. Horna..Assitant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter.. .Assistan Business Manager
Night Editors
'C. M. licking H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney J. L. Stadeker
L. S. Thompson E. L. Zeigler
H. C. Garrison
Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schermerhorn, Jr.
R. H. Fricken G. . Broph,
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews R. T. McDonald
C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganchow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smithr Seymour B. Wilson
Bernard Wohi
SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 1917.
Night Editor-J. L. Stadeker.
EVERY CLOUD HAS A SILVER
LINING
We have only two things to be sor-
ry for this morning: first, that we
can't have compulsory tftiling; see-
ond, that the necessary steps have not
been taken so that Michigan may im.-
mediately re-enter the western con-
ference.
READY TO DO OUR BIT
With the provision by the Regents
for a Reserve Officers' Training Corps
under general orders No. 49, Michigan
may now proceed efficiently to take its
part with the other universities in
helping the nation prepare for war.
Proper officers and equipment will be
furnished by the government which
could not have been secured under
general orders No. 48, which merely
provided for lecture courses in mili-
tary science supplemented by training
in the summer camps. To be sure, the
compulsory training which the stu-
dents asked for by vote of five to one
was not adopted, but as the Regents'
resolutions explain "we have not fac-
ilities for compulsory training."
In many universities where the R.
0. T. C. has been installed it has been
necessary to organize campaigns to
get enough men to enlist to make it
worth while for the government to
send officers and equipment. There
are at present enough men at Michi-
gan out for the voluntary training
corps to fulfill the government's re-
quirements regarding general orders
No. 49.
At Michigan we are ready to do our
bit.
ARGUES FOR PETITION
WANTS PEOPLE TO SIGN PAPER

PROTESTING AGAINST COMPUL-
SORY TRAINING

tion of every religion, of every moral-
ity which forbids them to kill or help
kill at command.
EDWARD S. ALLEN.
HARVARD TO GIVE CREDIT
IF STUDENTS ENTER CORPS
Faculty Votes to Give Early Examina-
tions in Order That Men
May Prepare
Cambridge, Mass., March 30.-Full
credit for students who may drop
courses to enlist in the army, and
early examinations if arrangements
are made by which students may de-
vote their entire time to the reserve
officers' training corps were provided
for at a meeting of the faculty of the
arts and sciences of Harvard univer-
sity yesterday.
Men whose academic year is cut
short by enlistment in the army or
navy, or the military organization of
any state, will be given credit as if
the courses had been continued to the
end of the year. They will be given
grades representing their standing up
to the time of departure.
Early examinations were also ar-
ranged for candidates for honors, dis-
tinctions, and the degree of Ph.D.
Yale and Princeton are expected to
take similar action within the next
few days.

Tremendously
Important
is this prob-
lem of life
work. Prof.
SHARFMAH
may be able
to help you
decide yours
at
LANE HALL
SUNDAY

=!111111111[1111111111111u11t111111Iluf l li ll tllll l 11 1 ilililllla tlll l1 Itt i iti
Knights of the Racquet -Attention i
We have just received a shipment of more than
100 Tennis Rackets
of the leading makes, including the
44 -
SLOTTED THROAT RACKET
Come in and look them over
NNWAR s
- UNIVERSITY BOORSTORES
IIllIlIIII111111li 1 11t I ilillliillllP1111|111111 1111111lllilllllil1n
PERFECT gentleman ain't pro-
duced by a night's study over
an etiquette book. Same way with1o
a perfect tobacco.
VELVET is aged in the
wood two years before
it becomes the smooth-
est smoking tobacco.

[0rKSMITHING---ELECTRIC REPAIRING
HIGHEST QUALITY
William W. Behringer
11 NICKELS ARCADE

F LANDERS
OR
FLOWER S
PHONE 294 213 E. Liberty St.
Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery Service
Flowers by Wire to All; the World.

We Offer You
ECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION

Resources $3,8oo,ooo

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Offiee--
707 North University Ave.
e Farmers & Mechanics Bank
O@ers the Best in Modern Banking
SNOUUITY . - EFFICIENCY
ivenient and Pleasant quarters. You Will
Pleased With O.r Service. Two offices
-105 5 main St. $ 30 S. State St.
WJ~omen j

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run ox Eastern time, one hour faster
than local tim..
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7 :35 a.
m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 7:io p. m., 9:10
p. M.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-S:48 a. m and
a*W" w0 hours to 6:48 p. M.; to Lansing,
I :41m.
Jac son Expcess Cars -(Local stops west of
Ana Arbor)-g :48 A. m. and every two hours
to 7 48*p. Im.
Local Cars Eastbound-s :3s a. m., 6:40 a.
m., y:es a. m. and every two hours to 7;S p.
M., :os; p. m., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. M. to
Ypsilanti only, g:zo a. m., g:so a. M., a:os p.
Ma., 6:05 p. m., x1:4S P. in., 1 :16 a. in., x1:2
a. m. To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:o5 a. m., y :so a.
M., te:s0 p. in.. r2:20 a. M.
Takes Pictures
Develops Films
S','wuinmakes Prints
and Enlarge-
ments.
SEVENTY COUPLES ATTEND B.
V. D. DANCE AND DINNER

ri

Fools' Paradise, Official Scores, and
Sheet Music far sale at Schaeberle &
Son's Music House.-Adv. tf

For Young Men

CHOP off a few
minutes and eat some of
OEORGE'S S VEY
WANI1KING LOG
814 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
Mrs. T. L. Stoddard's
HAIR SHOP

Got a typewriter from
O. D. MORRIL L
322 South State Street
He will furnish you an instruction
book free ol charge. You will be a
typist before you know it.

Marcel and Water Waving
Rain XWater used for Shampoos
Facial and Scalp Massage
Manicuring

Light and corrective gymnasium
classes will meet as usual next week.
Final apparatus tryout for all
Mlasses will be held at 5 o'clock Mon-
lay afternoon.
Women taking required work who
lave not tried out in any of the ap-
iaratus meets will take apparatus ex-
minations at the regular gymnasium
eriods Monday, and Tuesday.
Seniors are requested to wear caps
nd gowns at the luncheon today.
Tickets for the second performance
f the Junior Girls' play will be on
ale at 9 o'clock today in Barbour
:ymnasium.
Third annual women's luncheon will
e at 12 o'clock today in Barbour gym-
asium-
Regular April meeting of the Inde-
endent Girls' club will be held at 7
'clock Monday evening in the parlors
f Barbour gymnasium.
Hospital Notes
Arthur F. Anderson, dent '17, 1334
'olland street, is quarantined in his
Dom with the German measles.
Kenneth K. Cox, '18, 444 South State
treet, was taken sick with scarlet
ever yesterday and removed to the
ontagious ward of the University
ospital.
Dean Victor C. Vaughan has left for
ashington to attend a meeting of the
ational research council.
If its artistic wall paper you want,
ee Major & Co., before buying. Phone
7,-Adv. F-eod

About 70 couples attended the an-
nual B. V. D. dance and dinner at the
Union last night. This party was the
first held in the Union since repaired.
The hall was decorated with Japan-
ese lanterns and parasols, and cherry
blossoms gave a pleasing Oriental ef-
feet. Music was furnished by the Roy
Smith orchestra of Detroit.
Mr. James H. Cissil, of the engineer-
ing college, and Mrs. Cissil, Dean
John R. Effinger, of the literary col-
lege, and Mrs. Effinger, and Mr.
Ralph McGinnis and Mrs. McGinnis
acted as chaperons.

i
r

I

Independent Girls' Club Meets Monday
Eats and various forms of enter-
tainment will follow the business
meeting of the Independent Girls'
club at 7 o'clock Monday evening in
the parlors of Barbour gymnasium.
This is the regular monthly meeting
which all members of the club are ex-
pected to attend. 14
Important business is to be brought
up, and plans for a picnic later in the
spring will be discussed.
0.S.X. Military Instructors Await Call
Columbus, 0., March 30.- Military
instructors at Ohio State are expect-
ing orders to leave for active service
the moment war is declared. Student
drill, however, will go on as usual,
as it did during the Spanish-American
war. Several students have been forc-
ed to leave the university to join na-
tional guard units which have been
called out.
Rent a good Eastman Kodak, '10c a
day. Fresh Eastman Films. Open
every evening to 9. Lyndon Kodak's
Shop, 719 North University avenue.
After hours drop films through tube
at the door.

Editor, Michigan Daily:
May I use a little of your space to
urge the people of Ann Arbor and of the
University to sign the petition against
compulsory service, which (as has
been announced), the Women's Peace
party placed at Quarry's, at the First
National bank, at the office of the
summer session, at fraternities, soror-
ities and house clubs?
It is unfortunate that the petition
should be under the auspices of the
peace party, and will be interpreted
as expressing the opinion only of
those who wish peace at any price.
It ought to have the support of all
those who believe in individual lib-
erty as the deepest principle of our
national life, whether they themselves
would become soldiers in no war, in
every war, or only in wars which they
thought just. For over a century men
who believed it wrong to fight, men
who refused to fight when their con-
science said the cause was wrong,
have been wandering from land to
land, seeking freedom to do right. If,
the United States sbuts out such men,
they may soon be outcasts from every
nation. We have prided ourselves on
welcoming those who were persecuted
elsewhere for their beliefs; let us 'not
now expect of all citizens a renuncia-

I

ONE of the particularly clever models
that we are featuring this spring.
It has all the smart style of the double
breasted coat without the clumsy weight
that is usually found. The belted back
is also a part of good design this year---
notice, it is a belted back, not a pinch-
back.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan