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March 31, 1917 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-31

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THE WEATHER
SOUTH WIN S-I'IOB-
ABLIN AIN

tcaLt it t~ w at

UNITED PRES:
DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

V014 XXVI. No. 1 9. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 1917. PRICE FIVE CEN'
I , _______________________________________________

MIGHIbAN BREAKS
Teams Contend Question of Compul-
sory Investigation of Labor
Disputes
DEFEAT ILLINOIS BUT LOSE t
AT WISCONSIN UNIVERSITY8
Varsity Wins Five of Six Contests
During Three-Year Existence I
of Mid-West L'eague
Michigan broke even last night in
the two mid-west debates, winning ac
unanimous decision over the teamc
from Illinois university and losing by
a vote of two to one to the University
of Wisconsin, debating the question of1
the compulsory investigation of laborI
disputes.
In the three years that the league.
has existed, Michigan has won allt
three debates with Illinois and two ofa
the three with Wisconsin.
L. W. Lisle, '17L, R. W. Ward, '18,
and N. D. Ireland, '18L, composed
the affirmative team that debated
Illinois in Hill auditorium. S. D.
Frankel, '17L, R. F. Kahle, '17, and
P. A. Miller, '17L, were the members
of the negative team which met Wis-
consin at Madison.
Gov. Albert E. Sleeper presided in
Ann Arbor and the judges were Prof.
William Caskey of Oberlin, Prof.
Thos. W. Nadall of Olivet, and Presi-
dent Harry H. Crooks of Alma col-
lege.
A reception was held last night in
the Union for the men of both teams
and the oratory faculty. Each of the
Michigan debators will be received
into Delta Sigma Rho and will be1
awarded $50.
HOMEOPS FOR DRILL1
Vote 36 to Four for Compulsory Train-
ing to Begin at Once
Students of the Homoeopathic Med-
ical school voted 35 to 4 on Thu'rsday
in favor of compulsory military train-
ing for all students, and 30 to 9 in'
favor of compulsory training to ap-
ply only to the two underclasses. The
freshmen and sophomore classes voted;
in the Medical school which accounts
for the small total homoeopathic vote.1
NEUTRALS USE U. S. TACTICS
IN HARBORING ARMED SHIPS'
Washington, March 30.-Some of the
responses received from European
neutrals in answer to this govern
ment's query as to their attitude on
the question of the entrance of the
United States' armed merchant men
into their harbors have indicated that
they will pursue the same course tak-
en by the United States. They will
decide each case upon its own merits.
The state department let this be of-
ficially known this afternoon without
stating the names of the countries
which have responded.
PHI L AMBA UPSILON, CHEMICAL
SOCIETY, TAKES IN NEW MEN
Phi Lamba Upsilon, chemical hon-
orary society, held its initiation last
night in the Chemical building.
The following men were taken in:
Lawrence Atkinson, '17P, R. K. Brier,

'18, G. E. Campbell, '18E, F. C. Car-
ter, '1$E, L. 0. Case, '18E, E. G. Fohl-
man, ° 8E, A. H. Jenkins, '17, B. J.
King, '17E, F. R Nethaway '17E, P. W.
Shepard, grad., Samuel Tour, grad.,
and E. H. Wirth, '18P. Prof. H. H.
Bartlett became an associate memer
of the society.
"FELICIA FINESSES" GIVES
SECOND PERFORMANCE TODAY
Awaited by the alumni and under-
class girls who were unable to get
tickets for last Tuesday evening's per-
formance, "Felicia Finesses" will be
put on at 2:30 o'clock this afternoon,
immediately following the third an-
nual Michigan women's luncheon.
A small number of tickets may still
be secured at the gymnasium this
morning. Dress rehearsal was held
Thursday night, Prof. J. R. Brumm,
director, giving his work a final pol-

Threatens Spain
lkith Revolution
Strike Proclaimed by Workingmen's
Union May Disturb Pub-
lic Order
Washington, March 30.-A mani-
festo issued by the workingmen's
union with apparent revolutionary In-
tnt has caused the suspension of con-
stitutional guarantees in Spain, said
an official report from Madrid to the
Spanish ambassador today. The dis-
patch further stated that all Spain
was tranquil now.
The dispatch said, "A manifesto hav-
ing been published by the representa-
tives of the workingmen's union pro-,
claimed a strike without fixing a date,
clearly with revolutionary purposes,
and with the idea of disturbing public
order, which was very marked at a
public meeting late last night.
"The government trusts in the com-
mon sense of the working men and
in the efficaciousness of the measures
adopted to preserve public order. All
the press condemned the unjustified
action of the representatives of the
working men.''
Take No Action
on Conference
Michigan to Remain in Dark Until
Regents Are Able to Dis-
cuss Subject
No action was taken yesterday by
the Regents in regard to the resolu-
tion passed over a month ago by the
board in control of athletics, favoring
a return to the western conference.
It was said by the Regents at the
close of their sessionthat lack ofttime
prevented them from touching upon
the conference matter. Regent Gore
stated after the meeting, "The Regents
considered the conference question
the least important of the many im-
portant matters to come up today."
The indoor track schedule has been
completed, the baseball schedule will
start with the southern trip during
spring vacation, and still Michigan
does not know whether next year's
contests, following the football sched-
ule which has already been arranged,
will be played with conference teams
or not.
Inasmuch as the approval of the Re-
gents is necessary before a veto power
over the athletic board's actions can
be placed in the hands of a faculty
committee, which faculty control is
essential, Michigan will remain in the
dark regarding a return to the confer-
ence until the Regents are able to get
to a discussion of the subject.
Members ofthe board in control of
athletics -in commenting last night
upon the failure of the Regents to
take up the conference question on
the whole appeared to be disappointed.
Director P. G. Bartelme said: "In
the light of a statement made to me
by a member of the board of regents
to the effect that the Regents were
too pressed by other considerations to
reach the conference question and had
no intention of ignoring that issue, all
that I can say is that I am disap-
pointed that they could not get to that
matter."
Professor Ralph W. Aigler stated:
"I am sorry that the Regents were
unable to get to the question. We
would all be glad to know where we
stand on the matter, but no doubt all
the available time was taken up in
discussing emergency matters.
Dr. Reuben Peterson said: 'There
is nothing to say, All unfinished busi-

ness goes over to the. next meeting
when the matter relating to the con-
ference will probably be taken up."
Professor W. T. Fishleigh made the
following statement: "I had hoped the
board of regents would at this meet-
ing take action in accordance with
the recommendation made by the
board in contryl of athletics."
Prof. L. M. Gram stated: "I am sorry
the Regents did not get to the ques-
tion. It is indeed important that they
settle it as early as possible. I had
hoped that they would take action to-
day."
BAPTIST PHILIPPINE ISLANDS
MISSIONARY SPEAKS SUNDAY
Joseph C. Robins of Boston, a Bap-
tist missionary to the Philippine
islands from 1902 to 1909, will speak
Sunday morning in the Baptist church
here.

HOLO MASS MEETING TO
DISCUSS TRAINING ILL
NAVAL RESERVES AND STUDENT
VOLUNTEERS TO MARCH
WITH VARSITY BAND
Universal military training as em-
bodied in the Chamberlain bill now
before congress will be the general
topics of discussion at a mass meet-
ing for students and townspeople to
be held Monday afternoon at 3:30
o'clock in Hill auditorium.
Hon. Henry L. Stimson, secretary
of war during the Taft administration,
and Dr. Frederick R. Coudert of the
New York bar, will be the chief speak-
ers. Prof. W. H. Hobbs will preside.
The meeting is being held under the
auspices of the Ann Arbor branch of
the National Security league. The
Regents of the University, President
Hutchins, and the deans of the variousI
schools and colleges will be on the
platform.
A parade of the Seventh and Eighth
divisions of the First batallion of
Michigan naval reserves, and the stu-
dent volunteer military batallion
headed by the University band will
march to the auditorium and occupy
seats reserved for them.
Union Opera Gives
Extra Production
Tickets to Go on Sale for Pre-trip,
Performance at Whitney
Monday
"Fools' Paradise" will again be pre-
sented before an Ann Arbor audi-
ence.
In view of the number who were
unable to procure tickets for the regu-
lar productions, it has been deemed
advisable to give another presentation
on Wednesday evening, April 4, to be
called the pre-trip performance. Tick-
ets may be procured at regular prices
by mail order, or at the Whitney the-
ater box office starting Monday morn-
ing.
This presentation, which will be
similar in every way to the produc-
tions given last week, will serve the
added purpose of keeping the men in
trim for the annual spring vacation
trip which includes six out-of-town en-
gagements this year.
PATRIOTISM TO BE KEYNOTE OF
WOMEN'S LUNCHEON THIS NOON
Patriotism will be the keynote of
the third annual women's luncheonat
12 o'clock today in Barbour gymnas-
ium, given for Michigan women and
all others interested in the University.
The program of toasts will be pro-
vided by President Harry B. Hutch-
ins, Mary Farnsworth, '04, and Olga
Shinkman, '17. Helen Humphreys,
'16, will act as toastmistress. Mrs.
Henry B. Joy of Detroit will speak on
"Practical Patriotism and Prepared-
ness." The second performance of the
Junior Girls' play will be given im-
mediately after the luncheon.
LAW STUDENTS WITH MILITARY
TRAINING ASKED TO CLASSIFY
In order to facilitate the formation
of any future military organizations
in the Law school all law students
who have had any military training
and can act as drill masters for stu-

dent companies are requested to hand
their names in at the office.
Pvr Hgnry M. Bates stated last
nAitthat no definite action toward the
formation o? military companies had
yet been started, but he wished to find
out what material is available in case
such action should be started.
130 Enrolled in Red Cross Classes
More than 130 men are now en-
rolled in the University health service
Red Cross classes. This is the third
week of instruction for the students.
The classes meet in the health serv-
ice building and the men are taught
to make splints, adjust bandages, and
dress wounds. Practical applications
of the instructions are demonstrated
on a dummy.
Dr. H. H. Cummings, head of the
health service, is in charge of the lec-
tures and is assisted by Drs. Barss,
Peete, Gordon, Gilbert, Sherrick, and
Hagerman.

BOARD OF REGENTS
OUTLINE WARSTEPS
Voted for military training under
general war order No. 49.
Appropriated $2,500 for Univer-
sity of Michigan bureau of national
service to classify all men for serv-
ice in event of war.
Voted to suspend all intercol-
legiate athletics in case of hostil-
ities.
Voted to grant credit for semester
to underclassmen enlisting in mili-
tary or naval service.
Voted to graduate all seniors who
enlist in military or naval service.
Accepted with vote of thanks the
offer of the Michigan Union giving
entire use of building and prop-
erty to University for use in mili-
tary training or service.
REGENTS' ACTIONS MEET
PHRISIONS OFORDERS
ARMY OFFICERS AND UNIFORMS
TO BE FURNISHED STUDENT
VOLUNTEERS
Voluntary military training under
general war orders No. 49 provides
that students who sign up for the drill
will be trained by regular army of-
ficers with~the uniforms and equip-
ment furnished by the government
without cost to the volunteers. The
action of the Regents meets all the re-
quirements of the war department
concerning the detailment of officers
at Michigan.
"With the present state of affairs
continuing at Washington we should
be able to have from 500 to 1,000 men
in uniforms at the University shortly
after spring vacation," said Major C.
E. Wilson last night.' "Some arrange-
ment will have to be made providing
for the housing of the equipment
which will probably be sent, and also
a place for the drill," continued the
major.
Unitarian Club
rsents Play
College and Seminary Life Furnish
Background for "A Case of
Suspension"
College and seminary life will furn-
ish the background for "A Case of
Suspension," the farce comedy to be
presented at 8 o'clock tonight in the
Guild hall by the Students' society of
the Unitarian church.
R., C. Hunter, '17, who took a lead-
ing part in the Greek play "Iphigenia,"
has been directing rehearsals, and has
secured campus talent for the various
parts. The cast will include Ruth
Lenzner, '17, Mary Frey, and Lena
Sackett, '18, as seminary girls; Otto
Kreuser, '17, R. C. Hunter, '17, and
Ralph Jennings, '17E, as undergrad-
uate college men.
The parts of "a Celtic maid" and
"the seminary man" will be taken by
Beatrice Hagens, '20, and Charles Wil-
ner, '17; Abigail Blackburn, '18, and
George Hulbert, '17, will appear as the
two instructors.
In addition to the comedy, Harold
Stevens, '18E, and Charles Wilner, '17,
will give selected readings. Dancing
will follow until 11:30 o'clock. Tick-
ets are selling at 25 cents and may
be obtained from any member of the

east.
MRS. D. E. WIBER TO ADDRESS
UNIVERSITY WOMEN SUNDAY
Mrs. D. E. Wiber, who was in Ann
Arbor a short time ago under the
auspices of the women's societies of
the various churches, has returned for
the especial purpose 'of meeting Uni-
versity women. Mrs. Wiber will speak
at 5 o'clock Sunday afternoon at New-
berry hall on "Opportunities to Teach
Among the Mountain Whites and
Among the Mexicans of the South-
west."
An informal tea will follow the talk,
and women interested in this line of
vocational work may. interview Mrs.
'Wiber at that time. She will also
hold. private conferences all day Sun-
day, and anyone wishing to make an
appointment with her is requested to

NOT HAVING FACILITIES TO INSTAL
COMPULSORY MILITARY TRAINING THE
REGENTS APPROVE VOLUNTARY PLAN

PROVIDE FOR DRILLING UNDER
GENERAL WAR ORDERS
NO. 49
CONFERENCE ISSUE
REMAINS UNSETTLED

Board Grants Number of Leaves
Absences, Accepts Resignation,
and Confers Degrees

on

With resolutions expressing hearty
approbation of the spirit of the stu-
dent body as shown in the vote for
compulsory military training in the
all-campus vote held Thursday, the
board of regents at their monthly-
meeting yesterday, however, approved
only the voluntary training, on the
ground that facilities were not con-
venient to install the compulsory sys-
tem. In regard to the subject of re-en-
tering the conference, which was sub-
mitted at the last meeting of the board
in control of athletics, it was not men-
tioned nor was any allusion made to
the disposal of the question by the
members of the board.
Reconsider Action
In the matter of the military sys-
tem to be adopted in the University,
on motion of Regent Harry C. Bulkely
of Detroit the board reconsidered their
action of November, 1916, by which
general war order No. 48 was adopted
as a basis of training, and approved
voluntary training in the following
resolutions:
Resolved, That the Regents approve
voluntary military training and will
provide the same under the war de.
partment, general war order No. 49.
Resolved further, That the Regents
desire to express their hearty ap.
proval of the spirit of the student body
as indicated by the vote that was
taken March 29 .n the subject of mill.
tary training. Sach action shows a
patriotism of the highest order. We
have not the facilities necessary to in.
stall compulsory training; however,
the action of the board of regents in
adopting military training in accord-
ance with general war orders No. 49
of the war department will give to the
University the same system of mii.
tary training adopted by the other
leading universities of the country.
Resolved further,That the over-
whelming vote by the student body for
military training shows conclusively
that under the system adopted, the
facilities of the University will be
taxed to the utmost to carry the de-
partment.

be accessible to students in advanced
classes, of forestry or dentistry, or to
students in any department from
Grosse Isle.
In resolution the board acted upon
the proposed city contagious hospital,
and voted that if the city of Ann Ar-
bor provided the funds for such a hos-
pital, the University would furnish the
site and would guarantee all operat-
ing expenses.
Prof. Thomas Resigns
The resignation of Prof. Thomas A.
Bogle was accepted by the board.
Prof. R. W. Hegner was given a
leave of absence for 1917-18 to accept
a Johnston scholarship at Johns Hop-
kins university.
Prof. Ulrich B. Phillips was granted
a leave of absence for the first se-
mester of 1917-18. Raymond B. Rob-
bins was appointed assistant in mathe-
matics.
Prof. Willard T. Barbour was
granted a leave of absence for the
second semester of next year, in or-
der that he may deliver the Carpentier
lectures at Columbia university.
Benjamin C. Cocker presented a col-
lection of note books of his grandfa-
ther, who was formerly a professor of
philosophy in the University. A col-
lection of 925 bird skins, presented to
the department of biology and zoology
by Bradshaw Swail, was accepted with
the appreciation of the Regents.
The following degrees were awarded
by the board:
Bachellor of laws-Lawrence Bart-
lett, Weerd Hoogsten.
Doctor of dental su-rgery-Wllfred
A. Davids, Jacob De Liefde.
Master of arts in municipal admin-
istration-C. A. Fleming.
Master of science-Helen M. Martin.
Master of arts-Louise W. Conklin,
Walter M. Kelly, E. R. Phelps, Marie
I. Rosey, Anna Woessner, Jacob Ros-
enberg, Helen Stark, and Egbert Win-
ter.
W. T. Adams, '17, was appointed as-
sistant in oratory for three months,
and an assistant was also provided for
Prof. R. M. Wenley. The title of Earl
V. Moore of the School of Music was
made assistant professor of music and
University organist.
WANTS WORLD PEACE
Rowena Bastin Tells University Wom-
en to Unite Against War

.Appropria~te $2,50
In keeping with the action on mili-
tary training was the appropriation of
$2,500 to be expended in carrying on
the work of the University of Michi-
gan bureau of national service, an
organization recently organized among
prominent faculty men, and modeled
after the intercollegiate intelligence
bureau. On application from the com-
mittee of the Michigan bureau, which
is composed of Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley as chairman, and Deans John
R. Effinger and Henry M. Bates, and
Professors Jesse L. Reeves, the sum
was awarded for clerical expenses and
the conducting of an office, in which
names of available men are classified
in respect to the nature of the service
which could be given in time of war
and the publication, and mailing of
circulars to all men so enlisted.
Give Credit for Work
In the case of a University student
enlisting,' eX.ilitary or naval serv-
ice duri; ter, the board voted
that he ven credit for a full
semester's work, and in case of a sen-
ior, he shall be permitted to graduate'
with his class, providing in either
case, the- record of the student is good.
In regard to an underclassman who
enlists in either of the services, he
shall be allowed to return and com-
plete the work of the semester with-
out expenses, providing his record is
good.
Besides the disposal of questions
concerning military training, the Re-
gents accepted a fund of $2,000 con-
tributed by the family and friends of
the late Richard M. Hall of Ann Ar-
bor, who lost his life while in am-
bulance work' on the French front.
This fund will constitute a scholar-
ship loan to be known as the Richard

Rowena Bastin, '18, gave a talk on
war at 4:15 o'clock yesterday after-
noon in the forum above Calkin's drug
store. The meeting was in charge of
Mrs. H. Victor Simmons, '17E, who
gave a short introductory speech.
Rowena Bastin said 'the day has
come for women to assert themselves;
only man has done so up to this time.
Man has wiped out slavery and ty-
ranny, and women must wipe out
war."
In speaking of the Red Cross work,
she said, "It is the duty of women to
remove the cause of suffering, but
'not the suffering. Every time we roll
a bondage, we prolong the war, and
war must stop."
In speaking of the means to ward
off war she said, "Women must pledge
themselves not to help in hospitals,
not to marry a man who believes in
war; they must make this real sacri-
fice if war is to be averted. If this is
done, the iame of woman will be
written in the book of time as the
symbol of peace."
Mr. J. E. Thornton of the rhetoric
department also gave a short talk on
war. The main objection that Mr.
Thornton had against the vote taken
for compulsory military training was
that this training was inadequate. He
wanted "peace, as long as peace will
avail, peace as long as it will bring
about what we want, and then war."
Select Chaperons for Union Dance
Mr. and Mrs. Waldo Abbott will act
as chaperons for the regular Saturday
night dance of the Union. Harry
Carlson, '17, chairman; Edwin C. Gor-
don, '17, Arthur C. Stephens, '18, and
Waldon G. Harbert, '20, compose the
committee in charge of this dance. A
few tickets may still be obtained at
the Union desk.

call Marian Stowe at Newberry hall. Melville Hall memorial fund and will

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