100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 28, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MAR

April 8th

aster

Prepare Now

ake your selection from our vast assortment of distinctive
weaves and colorful blends.

G.H.
Merchant Tailors

Wild Company
STATE STREET

mom

Rackets Restrung
THKEE DAYS TIME
rices from $1.75 to $3.75 ALL WORK GUARANTEED

ne0
ions 430

Slator. Book Shop
336 S. State St.

ommli

Bicycles

Sweiters
Hardware

Rackets

Bicycle
Repairing
Key Fitting
Razor Blade
Sharpening

Base Ball
Goads

Official newspaper at the University of
Mi"tgan Published every morning except
Mnmday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Su>
scriptions: by carrier $2. o; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: Guarry'; Students' Sup-
Vl Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones : Business, 96.; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker.........,Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn................ .City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson. Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson.............. Women''s Editor
Leonard . Nieter . ss't Telegraph Editor
DeForrest S. Rood..........Exchange Editor
.Campbell...Assistant Business Manager
A . Pilit Eey.,ssita" nt BusnessManger
Roscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter...Assistant Business Manager
C. M. Jickling Night Editors H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney J. L. Stadeker
L. S. Thompson E. L. Zeigler
H. C. Garrison
Reporters
C. S. Clark James Schermerhorn, Jr.
R. H PrikenG. 0. Brophy
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrews C . R. T. McDonald
C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul E. CholettesHarry R. Louis
Harold Maki'nson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
Bernard Wohl
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 1917
Night Editor-H. C. Garrison
THE FAIRNESS OF THE VOTE
The all-campus vote which will take
place tomorrow has been arranged for
the purpose of placing the students of
the University of Michigan on record
in regard to the question of compul-
sory military training.
The voter will be asked to express
himself affirmatively or negatively on
two propositions. First, whether he

CHOOSE FIDE CHAIRMEN
FORYSOCIA. WORK
EXPECT PROGRESS IN HOSPITAL
AND DEPUTATION
ACTIVITY
Five chairmen of different depart-
ments of the University "Y" social
service work have been appointed by
the general chairmanand expect to
make this part of the organization the
most active after spring vacation.
The chairman having charge of hos-
pital visitation work is K. L. Weh-
meyer, '18. It is planned to have this
branch of the work co-operate with
the university hospital authorities
and visit by means of teams of vol-
unteers the children confined in the
hospital, who have no visitors on
Sunday.
Joseph D. Naftel, '18, is chairman
of the division dealing with the teach-
ing of immigrants. Work is now be-
ing done in this connection in the
Perry school. Miss Dicken of
that school has general charge of the
work and one night a week is devoted
to the work by the men engaged. Sev-
eral noon day meetings at the various
factories in the city have been ar-
ranged. Edward O. Snethen, '18L,
who has for several years done work
on lecture platforms will give short
programs consisting in short talks
and impersonations.
Several clubs are being organized
at the city Y. M. C. A. under the di-
rection of Alexander C. Crockett, '19,
who is chairman of the department for
doing work among town boys. Among
the deputation workers, in charge of
Paul D. Womeldorf, '18, several dates
have been secured for team visitation.I
The branch in charge of prison cor-
respondence reports that about 25
names have been listed. These lists
will be sent in at once and active cor-
respondence with the prisoners will
be started.
WAR ORDER EXPLAIND

- I tlli1111111 l1111111 tt1111111 111t 111111 i1111t11111111 11 11 111111111 1111111 n utlI,
Kights of tho Racq~zet-Attentlimn
We have just received a shipment of more than
10 ennis Rackets
of the leading makes, including the
SLOTTED THR.OAT RACKET
- Come in and look them over
UNIVER.ITY BOOKSTORES
=:tt lTllllillt l lll llllll1119 tl lit ll ll l tt'lit tlttlltltl tll tltillilll tl tll t

Take your Amateur Finishing
TO
DAINE

Mowers

310 State
Only Hardware
Near Campus

ANNOUNCEMENT

_ 1
r I .

SAM BURCHFIELD

& co.

Gives you the best Tailoring service
to be obtained anywhere in the coun-
try, coupled with a wonderful line
of Woolens.

Our Repairing Is Neatly Done
Sanitary
Cleaning and Pressing
Co.
Phone 2225
Successors to F. L. Hall
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
MACINES KILL RELIGION
WRITER SAYS LABORER IGNORES
PRAYER BECAUSE IT NETS HIM
NO DAILY BREAD

Rubber
Bathing Caps
40e & 50c

I

f06 E. Huron Street

Opposite Court House

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

.1

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo,ooo
Ann Arbor Savings Baflk
Incorporated 1869
Main Office-
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office- -
707 North University Ave.
e Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best is Modern Banking
SEOURITY " - -.EFFICIENCY
venient and Pleasant quarters. You Wil
Pleased With Our Service. Two Offices

S. Main St.

330 S. State St.I

PLA I N

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson"
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., 8:3o a. m. and hourly to 7:I0 p. m., 9:10
p. in.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-8::48 a. th and
every two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
3:43 p. Mn.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two-hours
to 7:43 p. Mn.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m., 6:40 a
m., 7 :os a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
m., 8:05 p. in., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. M. to
Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. M., 9:50 a. m., 2:05 p
n,, 6:05 P. In., 11 :45 p. IM., I :tC a. in., x :2t.
a. m. To Saline,"change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound-6:o5 a. m., 7:5o a.
m., Ie :20 p. tm.. 12:20 a. M.
", Takes Pictures
INDevelops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
ments,
713 Mo. VNIyVICR1TY
DAM .A O5H Alarm Clocks
tHLANDI.EYFR E4 $1.00 up
Fountain Pens-
_ ^.i Waterman and Conkkn
U. of M. Jewelry
Schianderer & Seyfried
MODERN BRBER SHOP
332 state St
A Particular Place
for Particular People.1
FRANK CO NOLICH, Prop.
City News

OP SUEY

-25c

WILL GIVE ALL
OPPORTUNITY
OFFICERS

AFTER 2-30c
Rioe (plain)
At all times

- 25c

STUDENTS
TO TRAIN

AN
AS

favors the adoption of general orders
49 as soon as possible, making drill
compulsory for underclassmen in the
literary and engineering colleges, and
optional for all other students in all
departments. Second, whether he is
willing to endorse compulsory train-
ing for all students in the University
to take effect as soon as possible.
Many have felt that an all-campus
vote upon a question which only ap-
plies to the underclassmen is unfair
to the first and second year men. The
committee in charge of the vote has,
taken steps to avid any possible un-
fairness in the ballot, and to secure
results which will indicate a sincere.
unselfish expression of opinion. When
a student votes upon the specific war
order which would secure for Michi-
gan an adequate and efficient system
of training for the University, he will
also vote upon the question of com-
pulsory training which would make
training compulsory for every student
of the University with a view to aid-
ing the nation in preparing for any
emergency. The purpose of the vote
then is two-fold; to indicate to the
Regents how students feel in regard
to the adoption of training under an
act already provided by the govern-
ment, and to place Michigan students
on record before the nation in regard
to their willingness to aid the United
States in war preparations by impos-
ing upon themselves compulsory mili-
tary training. With regard to any
such plan adopted, it is made plain
that students in subjecting themselves
to compulsory training will bear no
more obligation to a call to arms in
case of war than they already hold
as citizens of the United States. The
object of the training will be not to
force them into arms, but to prepare
them to more efficiently carry out the
obligations they have assumed in liv-
ing under the American flag.
What is Michigan going to do?,

Alony tea, good for home use 10c pks
Will open 11 a. m. to 1 a. m.
ichigan Inn 611 E. Liberty
Telephone 948-R
et a typowriter from
o. D. MAO R RILL
822 South Stfte Street
will furnish you an instruction
ok free of charge., You will be a
lat before you know it.
Women

Editor, The .Michigan Daily:-
In the interest of a clear under-
standing of what students will be ask-
ed to vote upon next Thursday, may I
reply to that part of Mr. Winchell's
communication in this morning's issue
of your paper, which refers to the
proposed limitation of compulsory
military training to the underclass-
men. It is not unlikely, and indeed it
was discussed at the meeting, that it
will be found wise later to make train-
ing compulsory for the upperclass-
men also; but the plan proposed is
the only one for which the war de-
partment has as yet made provision,
and it is moreover the one tried out
and in use today at every other state
university except that of Kansas.
There is in addition the great prac-
tical difficulty of immediately organ-
izing a body of some seven thousand
men, without having available such
a corps of student officers as is the
heritage of earlier years of training.
As the plan now stands in the pro-
posed recommendation, Michigan will
provide an entire student brigade of
three regiments, and probably in ad-
dition a regiment of volunteers from
the upperclassmen, graduates and fac-
ulties. Compulsory training will
necessitate an adjustment of class
schedules, and those of the freshmen
particularly being more nearly of one
type, this can be accomplished more
easily.
May I also say that the system of
military training now provided for by
the Regents is that of general orders
of the war department No. 48 so modi-
fied as to consist chiefly of lectures
on military science; and that the war
department has requested the Uni-
versity authorities to adopt in its
place G. 0. 49, or the reserve officers'
training corps provided by act of
congress since the regential action
was taken and the system now in use
at Harvard and Princeton. It has
also been intimated that with the
great demand for army officers in
this critical juncture, no officer is
likely to be detailed to the Univer-
sity of Michigan unless the more
serious and practical plan of training
s adopted. Let me add my own
opinion that the promptness with
which a detail is finished will depend
very largely upon the interest whichl
the student body and the University
authorities show at this time.
WILLIAM H. HOBBS.

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The numerous attempts made in
Europe and America to Christianize
the industrial proletariat have com-
pletely failed; they have not succeed-
ed in moving it from its religious in-
difference, which becomes general in
proportion as machine production en-
lists new recruits from the peasants,
artisans, and petty tradesmen into the
army of wage-workers. It is the ma-
chine production that makes the pro-
letariat irreligious.
The laborer of today ignores the ex-
istance of a divine Providence since
he knows that no Heavenly Father
would give him daily bread if he
prayed for two days and two nights
in succession; he knows too well that
if he did not work he would starve,
in spite of all good gods of heaven
and philanthropists of earth. His am-
bition cannot go beyond a raise in
wages and a job that shall last all
the days of the year and all the years
of his life. The labor of the me-
chanical factory puts the wage-worker
in touch withterrible natural forces
unknown to the peasant, but instead
of being mastered by them, he con-
trols them.
The gigantic mechanism of iron and
steel which fills the factory, which
makes him move like an automaton,
which sometimes clutches him, bruises
and mutilates him, does not en-
'ender in him superstitions ter-
ror as the thunder does in the peas-
ant, but it leaves him unmoved for he
lknows that the limbs of the mechanical
monster were fashioned and mounted
by his comrades and that he has but
to push a lever to set it in motion or
stop it.
The machine in spite of its miracu-
lous power and productiveness has no
mystery for the wage-worker, who at-
tains a practical knowledge in scien-
tific principles without having a least
conception of the evolution of science.
The indifference of our modern la-
borers in religious matters is a pro-
duct of their industrial environment.
Popular masses have always elabor-
ated spiritual ideas, which the philoso-t
phers had merely had to refine and toZ
obscure as well as the legends and t
religious ideas which the prietts havet
merely organized into official religions t
and instruments of intellectual op-
pression.r
MAURICE YALE KAPETANSKY, '17Ee

The annual report of the national
board of dental examiners has just
been made public and of all the col-
leges of dentistry in the country whose
graduates tried the examinations that
of Michigan ranks first with an aver-
age of but 1:3 per cent failures. The
report shows that out of the total num-
ber of 85 graduates from Michigan last
year, 75 were examined by eight state
boards and 74 were passed.
A college diploma will no longer
admit dental students to practice as
in former years unless they success-
fully pass the examinations that are
given by the national organization of
the state dental boards.
The cumulative results of tabulating
the state ,board reports for college
graduates for tho year 1910 through
1916 show that Michigan again leads
with an average of three per cent
failures. One of the most important,
.factors in obtaining this average is
the number of w states in which the
graduates of any college have come
up for examination and during the
above period of six years Michigan
graduates have appeared before the
boards of 14 states. In this time 431
of the 489 graduates applied for ex-
amination and only 13 failed.
VASSAR AIMS FOR PRACTICAL
COURSE IN PLAY PRODUCTION

QUARRY DRUG COS
Prescription Store
Cor. Seat. & N. University
MICHIGAN WOMEN'S
ANNUAL LUNCHEON
BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
Saturday, March 31, 12 o'clock
Tickets 50c for undergraduates
All others, 75c
MICHIGAN RANKS FIRST
IN REPORT OF DOENTISTS

NATIONAL BOARD OF
EXAMINERS GIVES
TABULATIONS

DENTAL
OUT

Ll women taking required gymna-
nm work report at 4 o'clock this
ernoon to rehearse for the depart-
at demonstration.
ickets for the demonstration to be
en at 4 o'clock tomorrow after-
n before the Schoolmasters' club
being given out at the office of
director.
Miss Gertrude Beggs will address
W. C. A. vespers at 5 o'clock Thurs-
afternoon in Newberry hall. This
he last vesper service of the year.
hop E. D. Kelly to Lecture Tonight
ishop Edward D. Kelly will ad-
ss the Catholic Students' club'at
) o'clock tonight on "The Ele-
its of Religion."-, The meeting will
held in the Knights of Columbus
lors at the corner of Huron and
ision streets. This will be the last
ure of the series to be given be-
Easter vacation.

Since Sunday, Dr. John A. Wessing-
er, health officer, reports two new
coses of scarlet fever, with eight cases
discharged. The latest cases are those
of Roger Braun, 16-year-old son of
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Braun, and Nettie
Fahrner, six-year-old daughter of Mrs.
Nettie Fahrner, 515 Detroit street.
R. I3. Goodrich, manager of public
utilities in Ypsilanti, son of Circuit
Court Stenographer E. P. Goodrich of
this city, has been appointed city eng-
ineer of Lansing, with a salary of
$3,000 a year.

Italian Freighter Stranded on Reef
New, York, March 27.-The Italian
liner Dante Alighieri with 250 Ameri-
cans aboard, reached port today. Pais-
sengers reported that they had seen
the Louisiana of the Italian Lloyd
line, the biggest Italian freighter,
stuck on a sand reef off Cape Tortoza,
apparently having been chased ashore
by a submarine.

When are you going to follow the
lead of your patriotic neighbor and
put out a flag?
A specimen of Ann Arbor sidewalks
in the municipal exhibit would be
listed among the liabilities, not the
assets.
Caps one day, toques the next. Dame
Weather rules the fashion world.
Ann Arbor boarding houses have
been caught in the wave of patriotism,
and are now serving hamburgers un-
der the name of "English meat balls."
Use the advertising columns of-The
Michigan Daily in order to reach theo
best of AnnArbor's buyers.

"Vassar aims to make the course in
the drama a practical workshop," said
Miss Mary Yost, member of the fac-
ulty of Vassar, who, is in Ann Arbor
this week to attend the meetings of
the Schoolmasters' club.
Not only are plays written and ar-
ranged for production by the students
enrolled in the course, but all the
scenic effects are under their direction
and they themselves act their produc-
ions that they may understand all
he problems of producing plays.

Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
St. tf

t
ti
p
P;
12

Women Offer Services to Navy Dep't
Washington, March 26.-The Militia
of Mercy, an organization of women
rained for war service, late today
placed at the disposal of the navy de-
partment the services of their organ-
zation, and promised aid in caring

t
t

Fools' Paradise, Official Scores, and
Sheet Music for sale at Schaeberle &
Son's Music House.-Adv. tf

Dancing classes and private lessons kfor the families of naval militia men
at th'e Packard Academy. tf when killed in the service.

mt

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan