100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 28, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER

r . iir it t~wut

FAIR
'IAR1ER

UNITED PRESS
D1AY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVI No 126. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 1917.'RICFIVE C

APPLY SOFT PEDAL,
TO WARSITUATION
Senator Hitchcock Reports Sentiment
in West Favors Care in
Next Step
U. S. GOVERNMENT CONTINUES TO
SPEED UP PLANS FOR DEFENSE

Western
sol

Representative Thinks Wil-
Still "Open-Minded" Re-
garding Situation

Washington, March 27.-While the
government rushed with all speed itsI
war preparations and the presidentj
was discussing further speeding up ofI
land and naval defense plans with his
cabinet today, the soft pedal was ap-
plied to war talk in certain quarters.
Senator Hitchcock held a long con-i
ference with the president at the
White House. He reported that the
sentiment back in the west strongly
favors going slowly. Hitchcock leans
to the view that congress now should
limit itself to approving the armed
neutrality course, and to providing
means for preparing this country for
further eventualities.
Hitchcock did not presume to re-
port President Wilson's views. He
indicated rather than the president
still has an open mind as to the formt
of resolution he wll ask from con-
gress. It may be, according to Hitch-
cock, merely a request for prompt ac-t
tion on appropriation bills to meet the
growing expenses of preparedness,
coupled with a request for authoriza-
tion to carry out armed neutrality asy
vigorously as the occasion may de-t
mand.]
It may be a- request for a declara-
tion recognizing a state of war, or it
may be a request for a declaration ofj
war, though the latter is doubtful.
ASSERTS NAVY LEAGUE MADE UP
OF MUNITION MANUFACTURERS
Whether a petition should or should
not be circulated among the students
of the campus asking their support in
defeating the inauguration of compul-
sry military training in the public
schools, was the principal topic of dis-
cussion at the Monday meeting of the
University of Michigan branch of the
Women's Peace party.
Ruth Huston, '18, led the discussion
by a talk on the peculiar nature of
the war, in which she quoted from the
records of the last session of congress,
endeavoring to show that those fac-
tions desiring to plunge the country
into war are also representative ofj
the steel, copper, zinc, and nickel in-
terests.
She asserted that the Navy league,.
founded in 1914 for patriotic purposes,
is made up of 19 men, all of whom are
interested in munition and supply
plants.
ADELPHI UPHOLDS LEAGUE TO
ENFORCE PEACE IN DEBATE
Enforcement of arbitration between
' nations on the verge of war by means
of a league to enforce peace was ap-
proved by a majority of Adelphi mem-
bers at last night's meeting of the so-
ciety. The house, divided into Demo-
cratic and Republican parties, after
a discussion of the question, decided
to uphold the plan.
Next Tuesday evening Adelphi's cup
and fresh teams will debate the ques-
tion of compulsory military training.
The following night, April 4, the
Adelphi-Webster cup debate will be
held in room B of the Law building.
The debate is crucial in the cup his-
tory, as Adelphi will obtain permanent
possession of the cup if it wins.
The collection of funds for the re-
decorating of the Adelphi rooms is
nearing completion, and according to a
statement of the committee, new desks
similar to those in use in the Law
school are to be ordered immediately.
WHITE TO LECTURE FRIDAY
ON "NEWSPAPER EDITING"
Lee A White, '10, former 'head of
the journalism department of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin and at present

secretary to the editors of the Detroit
News, will lecture here Friday on
"Newspaper Editing," supplementary
to course 32 in journalism.
Mr. White will give a series of five
lectures on this subject, alternating
with those of Mr. Lyman Bryson, who

Journalists Meet
At'Y' Tomorrow
Under the auspices of Sigma Delta
Chi, the first of a series of get-to-
gethers will take place at 8 o'clock
tomorrow evening in Lane hall. While
the object of these metings is to
bring into closer accord those stu-
dents enrolled in the department of
journalism, al other students interest-
ed in newspaper work, are invited to
attend. Refreshments will be served.
Ex-Governor Chase S. Osborn was
compelled at the last moment to fore-
go speaking at the gathering, as he,
had formerly consented to do. Prof.
F. N. Scott, head of the department of
journalism, Prof. John R. Brumm, and
Mr. Lyman L. Bryson of the rhetoric
faculty as well as Lee A White, '10,
and W. B. Shaw, '04, alumni secretary,
will speak on some phases pf journal-
ism.
Lenroot OPPoses
W"ann Suggestion
Progressive-Republican Leader Scouts
Non-Partisan Organization
for Congresst
Washington, March 27.-Representa-
tive Lenroot, Wisconsin Progressive-
Republican leader, in a formal state-
ment today announced his opposition
to Minority Leader Mann's non-parti-
san organization suggestions for the
house.
"I am confident the Republicans
next Monday will present a candidate
for speaker and a full set of officers,"
Lenroot said.
He declared that instead of a non-,
partisan plan there will be presented
to the Republican caucus Saturday a
proposition which provies in case of
a deadlock the Republicans shall pro-
pose a provisional organization con-
sisting of officers of the last congress
until the necessary preparations and
war measures are passed.
This would include the speaker and
other house officers. Other vacancies
would be filled in the ordinary man-
ner. This provisional organization,
however, would continue only until
emergency legislation has been passed.
Lenroot was frank:in his criticism of
the Mann plan.
"I do not see how any Republican
can support it," he said. "His prop-
osition sounds patriotic, but it will
not stand analysis. It constitutes an
admission that if the Republicans or-
ganize the house the country will suf-
fer."
MANY LOST WHEN
HOSPITAL SHIP SINKS
Submarine Adds Total of 31 to List
of Long Death Poster
in Few Days
London, March 27.-Thirty-one lives
were lost and 12 persons are still
missing from the hospital ship Aus-
turias torpedoed without warning by
a German submarine, the admiralty
announced late today. The Austurias
was sunk on the night of the 20th, de-
spite the fact that she was fully il-
luminated and her Red Cross signs
plainly visible. Thirty-nine ofthose
aboard her were injured in the ex-
plosion.
The official German wireless report
yesterday announced sinking the Aus-
turias. She was a royal mail packet
steamer of 12,002 tons prior to her

requisitioning for admiralty service,
and was registered at Belfast. When
Germany announced her policy of
sinking hospital ships on the ground
that the allies were using vessels
painted with Red Cross insignia as
troop and supply ships, the British
government formally indicated that
there would be reprisals if the threat
was carried out.
PROF. HERBERT SADLER AND 12
SENIORS VOLUNTEER SERVICES
If the United States accepts the
services tendered by Prof. Herbert
Sadler of the marine engineering and
naval architectural department, Pro-
fessor Sadler and 12 seniors will
shortly be put upon the work of draft-
ing plans for new craft proposed by
the department. A letter volunteering
their service was recently sent to the.
naval authorities.

PROFESSORS HANUS ND
AYRES TOSPEAK TODAY
SHORT TERM STATE INSTITUTE
CONTINUES SESSION
HERE
The short term state institute will
continue its sessions in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall today, with Prof.
Paul H. Hanus of Harvard and Dr.
Leonard P. Ayres of the Russell Sage
foundation, New York City, as the
lecturers.
Prof. Ralph V. D. Magoffin of Johns
Hopkins university, Dr. Frank E. Rob-
bins of the Greek department, Prof.
Campbell Bonner of the Greek depart-
ment, and Prof. Henry A. Sanders of
the Latin department will lecture at.
various hours today to the Classical-
Institute conference in Alumni Me-
morial hall.
A dinner for high school principals
and those interested in secondary
school problems will be held at 6
o'clock tonight in the Michigan Union.r
INLANDER APPEARS TODAY;
PROMISE EXCELLENT NUMBER
Oxford as it was and is has been
treated by Prof. Willard Titus Bar-t
bour of the law faculty, in a charmingI
essay entitled "Glimpses of Oxford,"1
which appears in the March number1
of the Inlander which goes on sale
today.1
The table of contents shows a light,
essay entitled "Some Notes on the
Uvular Art"; a fable, "The Frogs in
Cream," by H. B. Teegarden, '17; az
short story, "New Tricks," by Georgia
Jackson; a sketch, "My Disciple," by
Marjorie McKeown, '17, as well as a1
quantity of poetry and a number of
editorials.;
PROF. W. W. FLORER TO TALK
ON 'THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION'
Illustrating his lecture on "The
Ameican Revolution by Picture and
Word," with views of Boston and;
Philadelphia in th revolutionaryf
period, Prof. Warren W. Florer will
deliver a patriotic talk at 7 o'clock to-]
night in the Church of Christ, South
University avenue.
The purpose of the lecture is to re-
fresh the ideas of early American his-
tory and to present a new light on the4
war in which the United States gained
its independence. No admission will
be charged.
HARVARD TO DISCONTINUE GAME
IF NATIONAL CRISIS ARISES
(Special from Harvard Crimson.)
Cambridge, Mass., March 27.-The
committee on regulation of athletic
sports has empowered Chairman Dean
Briggs to take action regarding the
discontinuance of intercollegiate
games if any national emergency de-
mands such steps.
Drillers Urged to Bring New Men
Every student volunteer who has
reported at previous drills is urged
to bring with him a new man tonight.
There are 15 positions open for men
who can qualify as commissioned of-
ficers.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley will ad-
dress the members of the military
training corps tonight, after the men
have been put through some drills.
Every one who attended the drill last
Wed 'daw n ght will be expected to
take the same place he occupied at
that time.,

Deliver Lectures Today on Greek Play
Two short lectures on the Greek
play, "Iphigenia Amdng the Taurians"
will be given at 4:15 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in Memorial hall. Dr. F. E.
Robbins of the Greek department will
speak concerning the costumes, illus-
trating his description with stereopti-
con slides. Prof. Campbell Bonner of
the Greek department will then treat
the literary side of the play.
Librarians Consider Use of Books
Representatives of about 15 high
school libraries of the state will meet
in the Library tomorrow and Friday
at 9:30 o'clock to' consider a course
of instruction in the use of books
and libraries in. high schools. This
is the first meeting of the kind in
Michigan, and is held in connection
with the 52nd annual meeting of the
Michigan Schoolmasters' club now be-'
ing held in various buildings of the
campus.

Vote on Miitary Training
Do you favor military training as provided by general war orders
No. 49 to be put in effect at Michigan as soon as possible and that the
Regents of the University shall make such drill compulsory on the
freshmen and sophomores of the literary and engineering colleges,
such training to be optional with all other students of all depart-
ments &
If SO vote YES.
If NOT vote NO.
Would you be willing to endorse compulsory military training to
apply at once to all students of the University, provided the Regents
deemed such a step advisable
If SO vote YES.
If NOT vote NO.

Seventy Faculty Members
Campus Organizations
Answer Questions

to
and

WAR TRAINING Al
CLASS_ MEETING
STUDENTS OF LIT COLLEGE GAT
ER THURSDAY IN
AUDITORIUM
WOMEN MAY VOTE ON
QUESTION TOMORRO'

"FEIIGIA FINESSES"[
NAME of JUNIOR PLAY
THIRD YEAR GIRLS ENTERTAIN
SENIORS WITH CLEVER
SATIRE
What the women think of military
training and co-education is cleverly
portrayed in "Felicia Finesses," the
play presented by the junior girls in
honor of the seniors last evening in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. Jeannette
Kiekintveld is the author of the play,
which portrays in a good-humored
way the trials of the "co-eds."
Louise Hatch as Felicia, and Beat-
rice Fales as Mr. Rufus Breezy, her
guardian, shared honors with Wini-
fred Corcoran as Grace Edison, and
Lois May as Don Rood. Marian Hold-
on as Gladys Geraldine Perkins, who
spoke for herself and everyone else,
furnished a large part of the comedy
element, with Margaret Kerr and Anne
Miller as close seconds in their roles
of college men.
Annabel Frink as Professor Crusty
was ably supported by Louise William-
son, Paulene Champlin and Milda Jos-
enhaus as other professors, June
Brooks had the part of porter, while
Margaret Cooley appeared as a hold-
up man. Virginia Cavendish was the
studious and serious-minded room-
mate of the frivolous Felicia.
A number of catchy songs, and some
especially graceful dancing added
much to the effectiveness of the pro-
duction, which was directed by Prof.
John R. Brumm.
BANK FILES APPLICATION FOR
ONE MEMBER OF SENIOR CLASS
The National Bank of Commerce,
New York City, has filed an applica-
tion with the economics department
for the services of one member of the
present graduating senior class. It 'is
desired that the applicant begin work
at the close of the present semester.
All persons interested should see
Prof. G. W. Dowrie of the economics
department at once.
Foresters to Hold Banquet Thursday
The Forestry club will hold its an-
nual banquet at 6:30 o'clock Thursday
evening at the Renellen Hospice.
After the banquet there will be talks
by A. C. Carton of Lansing, secretary
of the public domain commission of
Michigan; Professors Filibert Roth
and Parish S. Lovejoy of the foresti'v
department, and R. Watson, grad.
'Mr. A. F. Hawes Addresses Foresters
Mr. A. F. Hawes, forester in th
bureau of markets in the United States
department of agriculture, spoke to
several classes in the forestry depart-
ment last week.
Mr. Hawes has charge of the local
agents in the north and west of the
United States who instruct local
county farms on points in forestry.
Latin-American Club Initiates Seven
Seven members were initiated into
the Latin-American club at a recent
meeting held in the parlors of the new
Students' Y. M. C. A. The total mem-
bership of the organization is now 32.
Plans are being formulated to bring
prominent speakers before the club at
later meetings.

GRAND DUKES PLAN TO
AID RUSSGOVERNMENT
NEW RULING BRINGS ORDER OUT
OF CHAOS BY POLICING CITY
AND IMPORTING FOOD
Petrograd, March 27.-The Grand
Dukes Michael, Alexander Boris,
Serge, George, and Dimitry, and the
Princes Gabriel, Igor, and Alexander
joined in a formal telegraphic notice
to the new government declaring their'
desire to associate themselves with
Russia under new regime today. ]
All declared they supported the view
expressed by Grand Duke Michael in1
refusing the throne, and renounced
their rights and privileges under the
old rdgime to now be exercised by the'
new government. A steady improve-_
ment in conditions was visible today.
The new municipal militia is main-
taining excellent order throughout the
city. Provisions are now coming regu-
larly into the city- and the volume is
increasing. Prices are slightly re-
duced. All the new ministers work
day and night mapping out govern-
mental plans. One striking thing is
the picture of the Chapmars and other
squares in the city filled with recruits
training for service at the front. The
efficiency of the new regime is ex-
emplified in hundreds of arrests of
spies.
START SEEKING OUT WIRELESS
STATIONS ALONG GREAT LAKES
Chicago, March 27.-Government
radio investigators today began active
preparation to run to earth and put
out of business outlaw wireless sta-
tions that are believed to be in exist-
ence on the Great Lakes.
Acting under instructions from
Washington all amateur and private
outfits are being located and ordered
dismanteled. The nationality of the
operators was also being ascertained.
The round-up of alleged German
agents and spies is also continuing
unabated..
Colonel Barlow Speaks at Luncheon
Members of the University of Mich-
igan club of Detroit, will be entertain-
ed at their luncheon today by the ex-
periences of .Colonel Walter Barlow,
'81L, who has recently returned with
the Michigan troops from the Mexican
border. The speaker is expected to
give a vally interesting and authen-
tic ecount of the conditions there
from the standpoint of a soldier and
To Speak on Subway Construction
"Subway Construction Problems" is
the subject of an illustrated lecture
to be given before members of the En-
gineering society at 7:30 o'clock this
evening in.room 348 of the Engineer-
ing building. The speaker is Mr. Wil-
Ilim V. McMenimen, vice-president of
the Dock Construction company.
Speaker Sends Check to Law School
The Hon. Charles H. Hamill of the
Chicago bar, who spoke h'ere during
the Washington's birthday program,
sent a check to Dean Henry M. Bates
of the Law school, yesterday, to be
used in any way that will benefit that
department.

Following the adoption' last night
of the preparedness resolutions which
aim to place the University in a posi-
tion to aid the country in preparing
for war, the first step which has been
taken by the combined committee of
students and faculty provides for a
student vote on the question of com-
pulsory military training at Michi-
gan. This training will be in the form
which is provided by general war or-
ders No. 49.
Students of the literary college will-
assemble at 11 o'clock Thursday morn-
ing in Hill auditorium to cast their
ballots. H. Gray Muzzy, '17, president
of the senior lit class, will preside.
The women of the, University will
have a separate assembly at the same
hour in the Natural Science building.
Dean Myra B. Jordan will preside at
this meeting and Dean Victor C.
Vaughan and Professor Jesse S.
Reeves will speak. All engineering
assemblies will take place in room 348
of the Engineering building accord-
ing to the following schedule: Fresh-
men, 11 o'clock Wednesday; sopho-
mores, 9 o'clock Thursday; juniors,
10 o'clock Thursday; seniors, 11-
o'clock Thursday.
The assembly for the College of
Pharmacy will be held at 2 o'clock
Thursday in room 151 of the Chem-
istry building. Medical students will
meet at 10:50 o'clock in the west
amphitheater of the Medical building.
Assemblies for all other departments
have not been definitely arranged as
yet.
In order that the proposed training
be thoroughly understood before the
vote is taken, the committee has asked
70 faculty men to visit fraternity and
clubhouses Wednesday night to an-
swer the questions of the students.
A meeting of these men will be held
at 5 o'clock Wednesday afternoon in
room E of the Law building.
Commerce Club Takes Trip to Monroe
Definite arrangements have been
concluded for members of the Com-
merce club to. take the trip to Mon-
roe, Mich., next Saturday at which
time a visit will be made to several
paper and furniture manufacturing
plants.
At the last regular meeting plans
were discussed for another smoker in
the near future. The official election
of officers was postponed until a later
date to be announced.
Chief of 'Police Wants Dogs Muzzled
A number of citizens have com-
plained to police headquarters that
bull dogs owned by students are not
muzzled in accordance with the city
ordinance. The chief of epolice de-
clares that he is going to enforce this
rule very rigidly in the future.
Senior Law Canes Go on Sale Soon
According to present plans the canes
for the senior law class will be here
ready for distribution before Easter
vacation. They cost $2.50 each' and
may be ordered from the following
members of the committee in charge:
Walter W. Wensinger, chairman;
George W. Bixler, and Robert M. Good-
rich.
W. E. Band, '16, Visits Foresters
W. E. Band, '16, who has charge of
the forest work in the United States
Indian department at Red Lake, Minn.,
visited the forestry department last
week.
Mr. Band was on his way to Difce,
Ariz., to supervise some forestry work.

Foresters Talk on Lookout Work
Harry T. Gisborne, '17, and Harold
W. Graham, '17, spoke at the Forestry
club last night on "Lookout and Guard
Work" at the meeting of the club in
their rooms in the Natural Science
building.

Botany Professors to Lecture in East
Professors F. C. Newcombe, H. A.
Gleason, and H. H. Bartlett of the de-,
partment of botany; have been invited
to deliver addresses in Brooklyn at
the dedication of the new buildings
of the Brooklyn botanical gardens,
April 20 and 21.

Professor Wenley Gives Last Leeti
Prof. Robert M. Wenley will deli
the last of his series of lecturps
"The Layman's Problems" at 4
o'clock tomorrow afternoon in
Andrew's Episcopal church, talk
on "The Church."

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan