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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 23, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY P

,.

C. & K.

C. & K.

S ring Suits
AND
*Top Coats
With plenty of Snap and Style
A large variety ranging
in price from

SOCIETY BRAND SUIT

Spring Showing
of the

and Top

Coats for Spring

and Top Coats for Spring

Crofut & Knapp Hats
$3.50 and $4.00
See Our Windows for
Shapes and Colors
TINKER & COMPANY
Cor. S. State and William Sts.

Come in and see our new line of Spring Hats and
Furnishings.
We make Suits to your measure from $16.50 up.
NEXT TO ORPHEUM

$15

to $35

C.& K.

C.& K.

Wadhams & Co.
State Street Main

Street

Your Floral Needs=-
Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

-=COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

----

It Was Washington
who said to his secretary, when the secretary was late to go to an ap-
pointment. "Either you must get a new watch or I a new secretary."
Now we do not know whether the secretary got the new watch or not,
but we do know that if he did he did not get anything as artistic or as
dependable as the watches as can be had by people of today, even if he
paid four times as much for it. Modern science has done wonders in
the manufacture of fine watches, as well as other things and with the
aid of delicate machinery finer watches can be made at a rate and at
a price undreamed by our grandfathers.
Our stock of reliable watches consist of those thin model watches
for the boys and the ever popular bracelet watches for the young
ladies.. We are prepared to serve our customers who have promised
a watch for a graduation present. We also have heavier watches for
those who want watches for rough use.
You will find our prices on fine watches very reasonable, and we
shall be glad to show you the beautiful designs at your convenience.
Hailere JFuller
State''Street jewelers

THRPS IN CANA ZONE
GAR WITHIILNCE
All Preparation Made for Entrance
of United States in
War
(Note:-This is the third of a series
of articles written by a former Mich-
igan student now at the Canal Zone.)
(By Mail.)
Preparations for the entrance of the
United States in the great European
struggle seem to be under way, and
making rapid progress. Probably the
majority of civilians who glance
hastily at the headlines of their news-
papers have no idea of the magnitu'de
of the task that will have to be un-
dertaken in order to have a truly rep-
resentative body representing the
United States in the field prepared to
defend her national honor, and to
maintain the basic principles which
resulted in the formation of the
Union; to maintain her liberty, and
prove to any or all other nations that
she has a right to exist.
At the present time, certain steps
are being secretly taken that will in
time, astonish not only the people of
the United States, but also the men
higher up in the countries who seem
to be inviting trouble. These prepara-
tions are indirectly affecting the
troops on the Canal Zone, although
little can be said about them.
Soldiers in All Parts
Members of the Fifth Infantry have
been ordered to different parts of the
Canal Zone where it is felt that their
presence is needed. The machine gun
company has been left at Empire, the
permanent post of that organization
to do the main guard duty, and "L"
company has the duty of guarding the
61 Germans who are interned there,
members of the ships seized in Colon
harbor. Two companies have been
detailed to watch over the radio sta-
tion at Darien, and others are at
Christobal. French and United States
cruisers are still lingering in the vi-
cinity of Colon, and their presence
adds to the feeling of security that is
gradually becoming evident to the
civilian population of the Zone.
Guards on Loks
Guard duty on the locks and spill-
way at Gatun has not been relaxed,
and companies of the first battalion
alternate weekly, two companies being
on duty four days and off three. The
third battalion is in camp along the
Atlantic coast, cutting trails and ac-
customing themselves to the terrain.
Should any attempt be made on the,
Canal, it is supposed that it would
come from the north, and necessarily
a knowledge of that part of the coast
is desirable.
Much news that would be interest-
ing is of such a nature that it would1
not be exactly wise for an enlisted
man togive it out. In spite of the1
fact that he is not in a position to
definitely state facts, there are alwaysI
movements that are obvious, and thatf
speak for themselves. However thet
stating of these deductions and ob-
servations might bring unpleasant re-t

PROVES ABILITY NOT
CONFINED TO TEXT BOOKS
PROF. R. W. WOOL) INVENTS DE-
VICE TO THAW OUT FROZ-
EN WATER PIPES
When Prof. Robert William Wood,
who is to lecture here next Thursday
night, was teaching physics at the
University of Wisconsin, he demon-
strated that being a professor has a
practical as well as a theoretical side.
The water pipes on an entire street
froze up and, with the aid of Prof.
D. C. Jackson, he devised a method
of thawing them out by the.use of
high power electric currents.
Professor Wood is to speak upon the
subject of "Photographing the In-
visible," which he illustrates by pic-
tures and experiments. He is brought
to Ann Arbor under the joint auspices
of the University and the Academy of
Science.
To many Professor Wood is known
as the author of the little humorous
booklets, "How to Tell the Birds from
the Flowers," and "Animal Anologies."
Intercofeof ate
Harvard.-More professors and more
funds are needed at the Harvard Law
school according to the last annual
report. The enrollment of the school
this year exceeds that of last year by
67 students and more money is need-
ed especially for the library and for
scholarships.
Harvard.-A joint lecture course for
the upperclass medics at Harvard,
Tufts and Boston universities is be-
ing planned to rush their work to-
ward graduation. Instruction in mili-
tary medicine is the main object of
the course and it is the intention of
those in charge to prepare the men for
actual field service when war is begun.
University of Kansas.-Dr. John
Sundwall, of the health service at the
University of Kansas, says that the
epidemic of smallpox there will not
be serious, as the coming of spring
weather will check the spread of the
disease. At present there are more
than a dozen cases of measles being
treated at the university hospital.
University of Washington.-Plans
are being discussed at the University
of Washington to install the four se-'
mester system now used at the Uni-
versity of Chicago. Under the pro-
posed plan the school year will be
divided into four semesters of 12

Electric Auto Heater-=Keeps Your Engine Wari
Costs very little to operate
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
if its not Right we make it Right
Phone 273 200 East Washington St.

CULTIVATING THE CLOTHES SENSE-
No way to do it but to see as many clothes as
sible that are excellently made-of well-comb
colors-and of graceful lines.
Coming to the Hutzel Shop often will show
what to wear and how to wear it.

pos-
bined
you

Hut.zel 's

_. . .

I MAIN AND LIBERTY
TYPEWRITERS
For Rent or Sale

Easter
Suits

Typewriting
Multig rphing
Mimeopsaphing

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

FORM FIT,
BERWICK,
R ROW
{km2tCOL LLARS
are curve cut toft de shuldrs
peAccdy. lSceltsNec, froc
CLUETT. PEABODY &CO: INC9fV4kers

IHamilton u s CollegeI
State and 1Oam
sented, 40 different creeds were found
to be used among the students. The
Methodist faith claimed 1,664 students,
Presbyterian 698, and the Lutheran
third with 339 advocates.
Ohio State. - At a meeting of
the senior class at Ohio State
university it was decided to prohibit
those seniors who have not paid their
class dues from voting for the class
memorial.
University of California.-Women of
the University of California will hold
sway on April 7, with a regatta on
Lake Merritt. The race of women's
crews will be the, principal event fol-
lowed by other aquatic exhibitions.
University of California.-More than'
50 candidates appeared on California
field yesterday for spring football
practice. Six varsity men and three
transfers from other schools were
among those reporting for work.
Syracuse.-Faculty men at Syracuse
are better rifle shots than students.
This was proved recently in a match
between the Onondaga student rifle
club and the faculty club which re-
sulted in a victory for the faculty by
a score of 750 to 732.
Ohio State.-A reunion of the for.
mer men's and women's glee clubs of
Ohio State university is planned for
the near future. The old directors
are trying to get together as many
members of former clubs as possible.
The committee expects to have at
least 400 of the former members back
for the celebration.
Ohio State.-Sixty students who
have completed the three year short-
course in agriculture at Ohio State
university, will be presented with+
certificates of graduation tonight. The
three-year course was installed three
years ago and this is the first class
to graduate.

N OW is the time to place
your order f o r that
Spring Suit.
We offer sport styles and
business styles in all wool
fabrics.

THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 So. Univ.

City News

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co.
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

The board of public works has
promised to comply with the receni
written request of Mayor E. M. Wur-
ster to the board to remove the mud
and debris from the city streets thai
has -accumulated through the winter
More men will be added to the street
cleaning force and more equipmeni
will be secured to do the work. Mayor
Wurster has asked that the work be
completed before the May Festival
starts the first of next month.
Deputy City Clerk Ross Granger has
been instructed to receive plans and
specifications for a garbage incinerat-
ing plant fcr the city. They must be
in by April 18.
As the regular meeting date of thE
city council comes on the same date
as the spring election,' April 2, the
meeting has been postponed until the
following Thursday.

. .

If its artistic wall paper you want, Dancing classes and private lessons
see Major & Co., before buying. Phone at the Packard Academy. ts
237.-Adv. F-eod
Rugs perfectly cleaned, washed, and
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad. I sized without injury. Koch & Henne. ft

WANTED
WANTED - A lady with a suitable
house near;the campus to board a
club of about 20 University men
for the college year beginning Sept.
1917. Box 11, Michigan Daily. 23
WANTED-Al salesman to work spare
time balance of semester. Only men
with selling experience considered.
Address Box AB, Michigan Daily. 23
WANTED-Large front room within 2
blocks of Campus with phone, call
Seager, Allenel Hotel. 23
WANTED-Two tickets for Fools' Par-
adise for Friday evening, first floor.
Phone Ypsi. 233. 23
WANTED-Lady for educational work
in Bay City this Bummer. $240.
Phone 359-M. 23-4-5
WANTED-If you are in need of any-
thing, The Michigan Daily's Class-
tied department can help you get it.
LOST
LOST - Mortarboard pin. Finder
please notify Francis Way, 251. 23-4

LOS.
LOST--Will man who took sheepskin
coat from Gym by mistake Wednes-
day night. March 21, call Easley,
350. 23
LOST-Phi Beta_ Pi Fraternity Pin.
Reward for return. Call 344. 22-3
LOST - Sigma Phi badge. Finder
please call 16. 23
FOR SALE
FOR SALE--Two tickets for Union
Opera, Saturday matinee. Eighth
row right. Phone 120. 23
FOR SALE-Two ticets for May Fes-
tival, 12th row balcony. Call 120. 23
MISCELLANEOUS

weeks each.
University of Pennsylvania.-Stu-
dents at the Universi y of Pennsylva-
nia enjoy the privilege of sending
wireless messages to any part of the
United States free of charge. A mail
box placed in the physics building is
the' recipient of messages which are
sent nightly by the radio club to al-
most any destination by a specialj
agreement of amateur stations'
throughout the country.
Cornell,-A scholarship known as
the American-Scandinavian founda-
tion, is offered to a limited number of
students in colleges of the United
States. They will go abroad for study
in Sweden, Denmark , and Norway.
Scholarships are not limited to stu-
dents of Scandinavian descent, but
are open to all students who wish to
study in any of these countries.
Ohio State.-In a canvass conducted
at Ohio State university to find out
the number of religious faiths repre-

NOTICE

sults to the writer, so for the present
no more will be written.
Penn Medical Men Ready for War
Philadelphia, March 22.-War will
find a medical corps from the Uni-1
versity of Pennsylvania ready to en-
list at a moment's notice. Twenty-
two medical school graduates have
already enlisted in the new corps and
the number is being increased daily.

yrI
4
S
IQ
is
I I.
d
a
s
a
ti

University of Illinois.-A campaign
for the subscription of funds for the
relief of Belgian children has been
opened at the University of Illinois.
President Edmund J. James has head-
ed the subscription list with $100.
DEAN EFFINGER ATTENDING
MEETINGS IN ST. LOUIS
Dean John R. Effinger of the Col-
lege of Literature, Science, and the
Arts, is at- present attending the meet-
ing of the North Central Association
of Colleges and Secondary Schools,
being held in St. Louis, Mo. While
he is in St. Louis the dean will also
attend the conference of the Military
Training and Campus association be-
ing held at the same time.
Dean Effinger will return to Ann
Arbor next Monday and will hold reg-
ular office hours beginning Tuesday.

At its April meeting, the Board in
Control of Student Publications will
choose a business manager and manag-
ing' editor for the Students Directory.
It is the policy of the board in filling
the positions on the publications un-
der its control, to award them on the
basis of merit to those who have serv-
ed in minor positions on the publica-
tions to whici the positions pertain.
It sometimes happens, however, that
no one who has served on the publica-
tions during the year is eligible or
capable of filling one of the leading
positions for the ensuing year. When
such circumstances arise, the board
finds it necessary to consider outside
candidates. This notice should not be
considered as an intimation that these
circumstances will arise this year.
All applications for these positions
should be in the hands of Professor F.
N. Scott, on or before April 2, in order
to be considered. Each application
should contain a statement of the ex-
perience of the applicant and should
be accompanied by the applicant's
eligibility card and any letters of rec-
ommendation which he may have.
BOARD IN CONTROL OF
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS.
23, 27, 29, 30.

---MINION

We .will mail

Score

and Music

UNION OPERA TICKETS-Wanted to
exchange 3 seats in 16th row down-
stairs for Friday night for 3 or 4
seats downstairs back of 10th row
for Saturday afternoon. Will pay
difference or will buy 4 seats for
Saturday afternoon same location.
Phone 1321-F2. 23

FOOLS' PARADISE
To any address for you.
Call us up, and open up an account.

U

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

U

Patronize Daily Advertisers.

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