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March 23, 1917 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DALRkkIDAY, MARKĀ±Z, ~.(

TO OUMAGOERNMENT
LOYD-GEORGE WIRES MESSAGE
OF APPROVAL TO NEW
PREMIER
London, March 22.-Premier Lloyd-
.eorge this afternoon telegraphed the
ollowing message to the new Russian
>remier, Prince Lvoss:
"It is a satisfaction to the British
eoples that the Russians now base
heir institutions upon a responsible
;overnment. Freedom is a condition
f peace, and I do not doubt that
hrough a suitable constitutional gov-
rnment the Russian people will be
trengthened, and will resolve to
prosecute the war until the last
stronghold of tyranny in Europe is
testroyed, and until the free people
>f all lands secure the blessings and
>aternity of peace."
The Irish party in parliament sent
his message to the Russian duma
>resident: "We offer to the Russian
luma our heartfelt congratulations on
:he liberation of the Russian people
from- autocratic rule, and send the
Rlussian nation the heartiest good
ill of the Irish nation."
Grinnell, an independent nationalist
member, declared. Lord Milner, one
of Lloyd-George's war counsel, had
recently been sent to Russia to fo-
ment the revolution. He moved a vote
of appreciation of this move, suspend-
ing judgment upon the new institu-
tions in Russia until time revealed
their character. Speaker Lowther
ruled Grinnell and his action out of
order.
PROFESSOR WENLEY LECTURES
IN SAINT ANDREW'S CHURCH

Opera Gleanings From Thu Gallery

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FRAYER BELIEVES SPIRIT
OF PATRIOTISM EXISTS
SAYS NATION MORE POWERFUL
POTENTIALLYATHAN 50
YEARS AGO
"Some of my students have tried
to prove to me that patriotism is an
outworn sentiment," said Prof. Wm.
A. Frayer in his address at the Y.
W. C. A. vesper service yesterday. "I
do not believe that there is a lack
of patriotism, but we are confused and
do not see the situation clearly. This
is the greatest crisis the world has
yet seen, and if we could grasp the
immensity of it our minds would not
stand the strain. I believe, however,
that in a few days something will
happen which will reveal as a flash
the essentials of the situation.
"We of the present age are some-
what to be pitied," the speaker con-
tinued, "because we have never had
to make sacrifices. Now it devolves
upon us to prove whether the last
40 or 50 years have meant degenera-
tion, or whether we are still up to
the standard of the old American
stock. I myself believe. that we are
potentially more powerful today than
were the people 40 or 50 years ago,,
and that every grown person ought toy
have in him the moral earnestness to
meet the test.
"Patriotism does not consist in hur-
rahing and waving the flag, but in
taking thought as carefully as we can,
in forgetting the frivolities and being
ready to meet the serious demands
which will be made on us."
The meeting closed with the sing-
ing of "America."
Dartmouth to Start Military Training
Hanover, N. H., March 22.-A mil-
itary course to be started immediately,
has been approved by the Dartmouth
faculty. Enrollments have already
begun and on the signing up of 100
students, application will be sent to
the war department to supply a mili-
tary instructor and equipment.
The course will require three hours
'a week work from those enrolled, and
once started, it cannot be dropped
without a forfeiture of the work of the
entire semester during which it was
elected. No academic credit is to be
1 given for the course.
Secure Pharmacologists for Summer
Prof. A. Ziefle, head of the pharmacy
department in the state agricultural
college of Oregon and Prof. C. H.
Rogers of the pharmacy department
in the University of Minnesota, are
the two pharmacologists obtained by
1 the summer session to aid the pharm-
* acy faculty of the University dur-
ing the 1917 summer session.

SdIERC~r&"

NEW AMERICAN ISLAND
MEN WHO PASSED BILL1
ZENSHIP

HONORS
OF CITI.

WRITES OF PORTO RICOI

051'o

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Perhaps many American college
men do not know that the beautiful
islajid of Porto Rico is an organized
territory of the United States, and'
that just a few weeks ago American
citizenship was granted to all Porto
Ricans.
Porto Rico came to the possession
of the United States after the Span-
ish-American war. For 18 years its
inhabitants were Spaniards by birth,
but were considered foreigners in the.
United States, while outside the
United States we were considered as
Americans.
This is one of the greatest steps in,
the history of the United States for
the last 15 years. The people of
Porto Rico have pledged themselves to
support the American flag and Ameri-
can ideas. As a result, the feeling of
antagonism existing between the
United States and some South Ameri-
can republics will be allayed, by the
granting of American citizenship to
Porto Rico.
.As a fitting expression of gratitude
to the United States, the house of
delegates passed a resolution declar-
ing April 7 a public holiday, and has
conferred diplomas on President Wil-
son, Representative W. A. Jones of
Virginia, author of the law; Senator
J. A. Shafroth, who had charge of the
bill in the senate; Frank McIntyre,
chief of the bureau of insular affairs,
and Governor Yager of Porto Rico
for efforts in the passage of the leg-
islation.
TIMOTHY SAPIA, '20.
PRESIDENT LOWELL TELLS
OF COMING RESPONSIBILITY
Cambridge, Mass., March 22.-On
the eve of this country stepping into
the vortex of a world war, President
Abbot L. Lowell of Harvard univei .
sity recently expressed himself oAt
universal military training in an ad-
dress to the R. 0. T. C. as follows:
"I never felt the responsibility so
great as I do now, but my duty is be-
fore me and it cannot be shunned. It
is a terrible responsibility to ask men
to go out and throw away all that
life is worth living for, but your
country calls you to a duty which is
the highest you have. On you as of-
ficers will depend the lives of other
men, and it is the duty of every man
to become as expert as possible, for
history is strewn thick with the
blunders of commanding officers."
Try The Daily for service.

GRMN RAIDER MOEWE
PULLS INTOHOME PORT
CRUISER CAPTURES 22 STEAM-
ERS AN) FIVE SHIPS ON
SE CONDI)RAID
Berlin, March 22.--"The German
auxiliary cruiser Moewe returned to
her home port of the navy from her
second cruise in the Atlantic ocean,"
declared a statement issued by the of-
ficial press bureau today.
"She remained in the Atlantic sev-
eral months under the command of
Burgrave and Count Hohna Schno-
view. The ship captured 22 steamers
and five sailing ships with a total of
123,100 gross tons. Among these ves-
sels were 21 hostile steamers of whom
eight were armed aild five were in the
service of the British admiralty, as
well as four hostile sailing ships. The
Voltaire, an English steamer with 12
centimeter cannon, 8,618 gross tons
in ballast, and the Halbgord, a Nor-
wegian steamer of 2,587 tons, carry-
ing parcels, and the -steamer Mount
Temple were among the list."
The dispatch gives the first definite
indication of the South American raid-
er as the Moewe. She had previously
been reported from unofficial allied
and neutral sources as the converted
cruiser Vineta. The Moewe on the
second raiding cruise just concluded
succeeded in breaking all records for
elusiveness. On her first raid the
Moewe was credited with sinking 15
ships. Her depredations have prob-
ably caused shipping in the neighbor-
hood of $17,000,000.
First reports concerning the South
American raider now definitely identi-
fied as the Moewe came in United
Press dispatches from its staff corre-
spondent at Buenos Aires. Later in-
formation said the raider had slipped
out of Kiel harbor flying the Danish
flag, and successfully eluded the Brit-
ish patrol fleet.
"WASTE AS AN AMERICAN SEES .
IT," TITLE OF HOLDEN'S TALK
Dr. Louis E. Holden of New York
City will lecture on "Waste as an
American Sees It" at 7:30 o'clock
Sunday night in the Presbyterian
church.
This lecture is the result of years
of extensive travel and observation in
Europe and America. Dr. Holden is
a graduate of Princeton and ex-presi-
dent of Wooster university. He was
the first man to interest Andrew Car-
negie in synodical education, obtain-
ing nearly $1,000,000 for Wooster uni-
versity.
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

* 4 * * * t " * * * *
AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Whitney-"Fools' Paradise."
Majestic-Vaudeville'
Arcade-Francis Nelson in "One
of Many."

"Each Man Must Himself Prove Val-
idity of Religious
Creeds"
"No event in the past has any mean-
ing except as it continues to live in
our own valuation," said Prof. R. M.
Wenley in his lecture on "Origins and
Valuations," yesterday afternoon in
St. Andrew's Episcopal church.
Professor Wenley went on to say
that the origin of our religious creeds
is of no importance so lon'g as they
apply to the everyday life of mankind.
As different historians interpret his-
torical facts in different ways, the
writers of the Bible infused their own
personalities and view points into
their works. Religion is not a matter
of observing certain formalities hand-
ed down to us, but of accepting what
applies to us and rejecting the rest.
"Each man must prove for himself
the validity of religious creeds," Pro-
fessor Wenley said, "a man is bound
to believe from his own personal ex-
periences that religion is the word of
God."
The lecture is the fourth of a series
.of five entitled, "A Layman's Pro-
blems." The last lecture, "The Mean-
ing of the Church," will be given next
Thursday at St. Andrew's church.
TWENTY-NINE HARVARD MEN
KILLED FIGHTING IN WAR
Cambridge, Mass., March 22.-Har-
vard students fighting in the European
armies stand 15 to one for the allies.
Of 16 Harvard men killed in action,
15 have given up their lives for the
entente powers while one has died for
the kaiser. Altogether 29 Harvard
men have been killed as a result of
the war, including those killed by sub-
marines and those slaughtered while
doing relief work or actual fighting.
Easter vacation is a good time to
have those rooms decorated. Call 237.
C. H. Major & Co.-Adv. F-eod

s,
*:
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Orphieurn-,Irene enw.ick
Owen Moore in "A Girl
That."

and
Like

Rae-Mary Pickford in "Mis-
tress Nell."
* * * * * * * * * * * *

AT THE MAJESTIC

Headlined by the best balancing act
seen this season at the Majestic, Jack
Dudley and company, presenting "In
the Moonlight," this week end present-
ation at the Majestic has a variety of
vocal and band music and several nov-
elty numbers.
The Oxford Trio, the originators of
basketball on bicycles, pleased with an
exhibition of riding and skilful jug-
gling.
The "Three Lyres" play on the xylo-
phone, cornets, and sing. The coon
character is responsible for a little
humor.
Rawson and Clare in "Yesterdays"
get across a sentimental little playlet,
supposedly typifying the talk and be-
havior of two little children. They
have good voices, but at times the lines
are a little mawkish.
"The Bison City Four," comedy
characters with ability to sing and
a real willingness to do a little more
than they were paid for doing, was the
best act on the bill.
Freshman girl of good appearance
for educational work, $80 per month
guaranteed for summer. Address Free
Employment Bureau, 600 E. Liberty in
own hand writing. tf
There is opportunity in The Michi-
gan Daily Ads. Read them.

FERRIS INSTITUTE MEN
HOLD BANQUET TONIGHT
EX-GOVERNOR FERRIS TO HEAD
LIST OF SPEAKERS AT
OCCASION
In addition to members of the
Ferris Institute club of the University,
graduates of the institute from the
Michigan Agricultural college, Ypsi-
lanti Normal school, Jackson, and De-
troit will be present at the banquet
of the club to be held in the city Y.
M. C. A. tonight at 7:30 o'clock. About
150 banqueters are expected to be in
attendance.
The Hon. Woodbridge N. Ferris,
president of the institute, heads the
program, which includes several mu-
sical numbers and talks by M. E. Kin-
ney, L. W. Lisle, and Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister. E. R. Shinnock will act as
toastmaster and Lee Parker and
Murza Mann will contribute musical
selections.
Catalogue Washington Students
Seattle, Wash., March 22.-Univer-
sity of Washington students are to be
listed with reference to their various
talents for government use in war
A committee has been appointed tc
take charge of finding out just what
each student is capable of doing, and
of presenting a tabulated statemeni
of the possibilities of use to which he
can be put when his country calls.
There will be a meeting of the Ann
Arbor branch of the Collegiate Alum-
nae, Saturday, March 24th, at 3 o'clock
at the Kappa Alpha Theta House, 1414
Washtenaw Ave. The meeting will be
conducted by the Child Welfare Com
mittee. Mr. Floyd Starr, the founder
and head of the Starr Commonwealth
for Boys, has been secured as speaker
His unusual success in his chosen
field of work, and his excellence as a
speaker are well known. Plans for
"Baby Week" will also be discusse
briefly.-Adv. 21-2-3-4

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They Are:

My Fairy Princess CORNETZKY
Winter Belles r - CORNETZKY
Two Kinds of Cirlies SIMONS
IfHadAnArmyof MenGORNETZKY
Ragtime RulestheWorldCORETZKY
In Spite Of All - - -CORNETZKY
Bandana Land - - - SIMONS
The Above Hits and Many Others Are In the Opera Score
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