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March 18, 1917 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EATHER

SNOW DI COLDER

I6 4y6r

4Iaittj

UNITED P

DA AND 1IGHT
W17IESERVICE

j

I..w... ..-

VOL. XXVI. No. 118. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 18, 1917. PRICE FIVE CE'

48 HOUR TRUCE FENDS OFF GIANT
RAILROAD STRIKE AS MEllTORS
STRIVE TO MAKE PARTIES AGREE

Free

13,000

Belgians from

Germany at ope 's Request

CORNELL EASILY DEFEATS VARSITY
TRACK TEAM; ONE INDOOR RECORBD
BROKEN AND TWO OTHERS EQUALE

ARMISTICE
hOURS0

COMES AFTER isI LECTURES TONIGHTI
OF CONTINUOUS

CONFERENCE

POSTPONEMENT
PROMISE OF

GIVES
SUCCESS

Rome, March 17.-Germany has acceded to Pope Benedict's plan
for repatriation of the Belgians deported from their country, by return-
ing 13,000 of the 18,000 deported, accordingrto the newspaper Coriers
d'Italia today.
The Hague queen, Wilhelmina of Holland, has acceded to the request
of King Alfonso of Spain to co-operate in continuing the Belgian relief
work in the event of war between Germany and America, according to
announcement by the Cologne Gazette tonight. It was stated the
queen has already directed a number of Dutch students to prepare to
replace the American relief workers.

VERNE

WINDNAGLE

1hope Suprelne Court Will Land
Down Decision on Adamson Law
Constitutionality Monday
'New York, March 17.--The greatest
nation-wide railroad strike that was
to have started its sweep of the coun-
try tonight has been postponed, and
perhaps averted.
The brotherhood chiefs, after vir-
tually 18 hours continuous conference
with President Wilson's mediators and
the railway managers, agreed late to-
day to grant a 48-hour armistice.
Tonight both camps are burning oil
late, discussing the proposition that
Secretaries Lane and Wilson, and
Daniel Willard brought from Wash-
ington in the name of the president.
Tomorrow the mediators will take
up the fight where they left off, this
time inspired by the victory of a post-
ponement to spur them on. The broth-
erhoods will meet the mediators at 10
o'clock.
Immediately after this conference
is concluded, the managers will go
Into session with the mediators, and,
unless the mediators judged wrong,
another joint meeting will be held.
The mediators will go great lengths
to settle the strike at this joint meet-
ing. If necessary they are ready to
carry it far into the night, and prob-
ably until Monday morning. Optim-
ism ruled all three camps tonight, and
the clouds that had darkened parted
at least temporarily. If these meet-
ings fail to affect a permanent agree-
ment, a supreme court decision on the
constitutionality of the Adamson law
on Monday may clear away all the
threatening dangers of the situation.
Adamson Law
It was learned tonight that broth-
erhood chiefs, in explaining to their
general chairman their reasons for
postponing the strike order, declared
they are ready to go ahead with the
strike if the supreme court hands
down a decision against the 'Adamson
law. Their. fight in that event would
be based on an eight-hour day with
10 hours pay pro rata for overtime.
The brotherhoods will not fly in the
face of the president's advice. W. S.
Stone, president of the engineers, said:
"The president has given the medi-
ators full power to go great lengths
to prevent a railroad paralysis. We
would say that the postponement por-
tends a definite settlement. The presi-
dent has sent a body of representa-
tives with the request that we give
them time to work out plans to clear
up the situation. We are reasonable
men.
"Unless, however, something more
definite is agreed upon, the situation
on Monday evening at 6 o'clock will
revert to where it would have been
at that hourtonight, were it not for
these conferences."~
PROF. R. T. CRANE LECTURES
ON CITY PLANNING TODAY

OsgNDK WS TO PEOPLES WILL'

REVOLUTION OUTCOME Of
GROWTH Of DEMOCRACY

Dr. W. P. Behan, president of the
Baptist Missionary Training school of
Chicago will speak on "The Call of
the Hour" this morning in the First
Baptist church.
Dr. Behan was formerly director of
the Baptist guild in Ann Arbor and
is at present training men for Sunday
schools, churches, and the foreign
missionary field.
Dr. Behan will address the girls of
the guild at noon today and the B.
Y. P. U. and their friends at 4:30
o'clock.
BriishUCaptur
Front of 15 Miles in Big Drive
on Ancre Front

REFUSES TO BECOME RULER OF
COUNTRY WITHOUT POPU-
LAR CHOICE
Petrograd, March 17.-Even the
Romanoffs have bowed to the will of
the Russian people.
Grand Duke Michael, originally des-
ignated by the Russian provisional
government as regent until the czar-
ivitch should come of age, was an-
nounced today as having refused the
throne proffered to him by Czar
Nicholas in abdicating his rights to
heredity, unless the" people of Russia
should choose him as ruler.
The grand duke's acquiescence in
the popular vote for formation of the
new Russian government tonight ac-
celerated the spread of the movement.
Practically all of Russia is now
pledged to the democracy which has
succeeded the autocracy of old. In
the meanwhile, order is rapidly being
cstored. .
One of the developments which was
still concealed in doubt tonight was
what had become of the czar and his
family. Petrograd dispatches did not
reveal his whereabouts nor his con-
dition, nor did they confirm reports
here that the czarivitch, who had been
ill for several days with scarlet fever,
had died. The whereabouts of the
czarina were not told.
REV. (x. W. KNEPPER TO TALK
TO STUDY CLASS TOMORROW
Rev. George W. Knepper will ad-
dress the Union Study class on the
subject "The Protestant Epoch of
Christian Conquest" at the meeting to
be held at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow
night in Lane hall.
Mrs. Franklin Ohlinger will lead
in the bible reading and Jess R.
Simpson, '18, will give an oration on
"Sentinels of Peace." Milner S. Bal-
lard, homoeop '20, will sing.

RUSSIAN REBELLION NO UPRIS-
OF AN IRRESPONSIBLE
MOB
(By Prof. Clarence L. Header.)
The Russian revolution of last week
was no spasmodic uprising of an
irresponsible mob, but was the in-
evitable outcome of the steady growth
of the democratic spirit in Russia and
the patient labors of thousands of
self-sacrificing patriots extending over
a period of 200 years.
This steady progress has been
marked by many important events,
chief among which are the following:
the foundation of the 13 Russian un-
iversities (the earliest, Moscow uni-
versity, in 1775), and scores of tech-
nical schools; the formidable but fu-
tile peasant uprising of 1773-1775
(contemporary with our Revolution-
ary war); the unsuccessful December
revolution of 1825; the development
of a rich modern literature, which has
been a powerful helpmeet to the
cause of democracy; the emancipation
of some 45,000,000 serfs in 1868, and
the consequent extension of the public
school system; the reign of terror and
nihilism in the later seventies that
culminated in the assassination of
the Emperor Alexander II in 1881; the
incipient development of industrial-
ism, which has produced a large and
discontented city proletariate; and fin-
l ally, the revolution of 1905-1906,
which, though at the time it appeared
to be successful, proved to be only
a stepping stone to the events; of last
week.
Western Culture Helped
Probably nothing has had greater
influence in awakening the slumber-
ing democratic instincts of the Russ-
ian people than the steady stream of
western culture that has been pouring
over into Russia since before the days
of Peter the Great. It filled Russia
with the spirit of the Magna Carta,
French idealism, and the American
(Continued on Pago Six.)

Winner of 1916 eastern intercol-
legiate mile run and winner of 880-
yard dash last night, coming within
4-5 of a second of record set in Wa-
terman gymnasium by John Paul
Jones of Cornell.
Prepare Doctors
in mtilitary Duty

Michigan Medical Men to Form
serve Corps for United-
States Army

Re-

London, March 17.-The
day's advance which the

biggest
British

forces have made in the big drive on
the Ancre was reported tonight by
Field Marshal Haig. British troops
advanced and entered the enemies
positions on a front of 15 miles, he de-
clared in detailing the capture of Ba-
paume and Le Transloi with a num-
ber of other villages.
"Fighting with the German rear
guards preceded the taking of Ba-
paume," Haig .stated. "The village was
found systematically pillaged, and all
buildings, public and private, were de-
stroyed, all valuables being carried
off."
TO SHOW PAINTINGS BY CITY
ARTISTS IN MEMORIAL HALL
Paintings owned by Ann Arbor peo-
ple, and paintings and etchings of Ann
Arbor artists will be the feature of
the art exhibit which will open Tues-
day night in Alumni Memorial hall.
The opening will be in the form of a
reception.
The committee is at work hanging
the pictures. The exhibit is given un-
der the auspices of the Ann Arbor
Art association and will be free to
members of the. association. A small
admission fee will be charged to non-
members.
11. C. Rummel, '16L, Visits in City
Henry C. Rummel, '16L, president
of last year's Student council, visited
Ann Arbor yesterday on his way to
Hillsdale. Mr. Rummel is practicing
law in Detroit.
Michigan Boat Club Officers Meet
Officers of the Michigan Boat club
will meet at 11 o'clck this morning
in the Michigan Union to choose club
officers for the coming canoeing sea-
son.

Presbyterian Church
HURON & DIVISION STS.
Leonard A. Barrett
10:30 How Make Christ Real
PROF. CROSS Illuatrated address at noon
6:30 Young People's Service

The Michigan committee of doctors
appointed by the national board for
civilian medical preparedness met yes-
terday afternoon to take action in pre-
paring the doctors of the state in
medical military affairs.
The state committee of nine doctors,
with Dr. Reuben Peterson, medical
director of the University hospital,
as chairman and Dean Victor C.
Vaughan as a member of the national
board, appointed five doctors from all
the counties throughout Michigan to
be members of a sub-committee to
serve on the council for national de-
fense. The duties of this sub-commit-
tee will be to secure a definite num-
ber of medical men to form a reserve
corps of the United States army.
Dr. Peterson to Lecture in Lane Hall
Dr. Reuben Peterson will deliver
the third of a series of general edu-
cational talks tonight in Lane hall.
Dr. Peterson will speak on "Medicine
as a Profession" and will tell of the
general advantages and disadvantages
of that branch of science. The lec-
ture will begin at 6:30 o'clock.
Announce Engagement of A. Nelson
Announcement has been made of
the engagement of Amy Nelson, '17,
of Omaha, Neb., to Robert F. Smith,
'16, of Swanton, O.
Mr. Smith when in college was a
member of the Hermitage club and of
the Phi Lambda Alpha fraternity, and
is at present located in Buffalo.
Prof. Herbert R. Cross Talks at Noon
Prof. Herbert R. Cross of the fine
arts department, will deliver an illus-
trated lecture at noon today in the
Presbyterian church, his subject being
"The Passion Week of Christ."
Dr. H. W. Emerson Goes to Saginaw
Dr. Herbert W. Emerson has left
for Saginaw to give testimony on the

LARGEST CROWD WHICH EVE
WITNESSED MICHIGAN IN-
DOOR MEET
BOYNTON TAKES CLOSE
MILE FROM CARROLI
Intercollegiate Champions Receiv
Six Firsts to But Three
for Wolverines
Breaking one Michigan indoor rec-
ord and tying two others, Cornell's
intercollegiate championship trac
team easily defeated the Wolverines
last night. The final score was 50 1-
to 261-2.
Cleminshaw of Cornell knocked 1-
second from the 60-yard high hurdle
mark of the freshman captain, John
son, by turning in a mark of 8 sec
onds. O'Brien easily won the 50-yar
dash, and in doing so equaled his
own mark. Boynton now jointly holds
the Waterman gym mile record wit
John Paul Jones at 4:19 2-5.
This same Boynton took the larg-
est crowd which ever saw a Michi-
gan indoor meet totally off their feel
by taking down the mile three yards
in the lead of Eddie Carroll. Boyn-
ton came here unheralded, and goes
with a well earned decision over th
greatest miler Michigan ever pro
duced. .
Michigan Leads at Start
Michigan took the lead at the star
of the program by annexing six points
in the shot put. Moakley's protege
shook the dust from themselves in th
mile, and by doing so, tied Michigar
at 9 apiece. O'Brien gave the Wol
verines their last chance to rejoice
in the 50-yard dash, for eight pointE
in the hurdles put the Ithacans intc
a lead which was never threatened.
Dresser of the visitors took the
pole early in the mile, but surrendered
it to Carroll during the second lap
Boynton in the meanwhile was set-
ting a steady pace, and during the
third lap was running neck and nec1
with the Michigan leader. The twc
leaders were but a step apart at the
half mile, which was negotiated it
2:06. More exciting the struggle be-
came as each lap saw the rivals con-
tinuing the same fast clip, and the
same relations. During the ninth lap
Carroll forged a scant two yards int
the lead, but at the beginning of th
last circuit, Boynton was running o
even terms again. By a well time
sprint which outdid that of Carroll
the Cornellian finished less than a
second ahead of Eddie.
Cross Takes Shot Put
Cross had an easy time in the sht
put, beating the best mark of Richard
by more than two feet. Smith trie
hard to overcome the best hoist o
the Corneian, but had to conten
himself with a third.
O'Brien handily won the first hea
of the 50-yard dash, and Thompso
tied with-Bartschinhthe second. Obi
had the same lead of two yards a
breasting the tape in the final, an
Thompson squeezed in a point by jus
beating Bartsch to the tape. But fo:
a slow start, Thompson might hav
looked good for a second.
Cornell got three .of the four me
into the finals of the hurdles, bu
Beardsley slid into third place ahea
of Pratt, who had all the best of hin
in the opening heat.
Cornell Wins Half Mile
The Big Red team as expected, too]
away a cleanup in the half mile. Show
ing the fastest time of the season, Fo
could only place fourth. Cornelli
superiority over Michigan was neve

questioned in the first two places from
the start, but until the last lap and a
(Continued on Page Three.)

Prof. Robert T. Crane of the po-
litical science department will deliver
the next of a series of lectures on
city planning at noon tomorrow in
the Congregational church on "The
Best Form of Government to Make
and Carry Out a Definite City Plan."
The lecture will deal with the com-
mission manager form of city govern-
ment. The city of Ann Arbor is at
present considering the adoption of
this form of city government.

First Methodist Church
A. W. STALKER, D. D., Minister

10:30 - Twice-Born

7:30 - Seriousness of Sin

!I r 11 .. --, -,

+ i ' water case.

t

I I

ANOTHER INTERESTING TALK BY

TO-NIGHT

Dr. euben

Peterson

TO-NIGHT

6:30-7:30

6:30-7:30,

"MEDICINE AS A PROFESSION"

LANE HALL

MUSIC
ptIANO
'CELLO
VIO0IN

MUSICIANS
TABER
JOHNSON
FRACKELTON

LANE HALL

I1

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