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March 16, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

SOCIETY BRAND SUI

NO TICE

1917 Showing of
Exclusive Patterns in Neckwear
$1.00 the Tie

and Top Coats for

Spring

I

Senior

Dents

Why buy

a 'ready-to-wear suit when we can
to your order at
$25.00 to $35.00'

build one

Get your Canes N 0 W

It will fit better, wear better and you will feel better
with it on. Let us show you.
TINKER & COMPANY
Clothes, Furnishings and Hats
Cor. State and Wiliam Sts.

Come in and see our new line of Spring Hats and
Furnishings.
We make Suits to your measure from $16.5O up.
NEXT TO ORPHEUM

d'

from

Wadhams & Co.

State Street Arcade

"DOWN -AND-OUTS" AE
STUDIED BY COLLEGE

PROF WENLEY LECTURES
ON "DOGMA AND FACT"

Electric Auto Heater--Keeps Your Engine Warm
Costs very little to operate
Washtenaw Electric Shop
The Shop of Quality
if its not Right we make it Right
Phone 373 200 East Washington St.

mmus"ffivrZommus

MIWA

ft

11

Waists and Skirts
graceful and charming as the ordinary sort
of waists and skirts almost never are-
And very low in price.
Hutzel's
MAIN AND LIBERTY.

. .....
..

Your Floral Needs==
Are BEST SATISFIED By Us
PHONE 115
Cut Flowers Flowering Plants
FLOWERS FOR DECORATION

==COUSINS & MALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.

G1

4

l

I-

IF YOU BREAK YOUR LENSES
Bring the broken pieces to us and we will grind you a new lens in
our own shop. We have facilities for giving you prompt service and
our charge is very moderate, beiIg regulated according to the com-
plexity of the lens.
It wouldn't pay you to go without glasses even for a short time, so
bring us your injured ones immediately after you break them and we
will grind new ones with all haste.
Our stock of optical goods and accessories Is complete, which en-
ables us to give you just what you have been looking for.
HALLER & FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS

The
Cyc-Corpus Juris
System

REPRESENTATIVE OF Y. M. C. A.I
IN CHICAGO TELLS OF WORK
DONE
Gripping description of life in Chi-
cago characterized the interview givent
yesterday by Prof. O. D. Foster of thee
Chicago "Y" college, in which he out-r
lined the course of traiing given to
men taking association preparatory
work.t
Men entering the college are given
special training in social psychology,I
athletics, practical sociology, and re-I
ligion. In the course of sociology1
they take trips to various places
around Chicago in which they come in
contact with the dregs of humanity.
Professor Foster told of a "flop" housec
which he visited last week. "Thet
building was an old warehouse. Alongg
the side of this structure rows oft
rough board shelves are erected. Fort
five cents men may sleep here. They
all sleep with their clothes on, using
their shoes for pillows.
"The entire structure is heated by
a stove in the center of the room. The9
stove is kept red hot all the time. The
windows are hermetically sealed.9
The smell from the bad air is in-
tolerable. Some of the men "flopping",
in one of these places are very young,
with faces that promise power to do
things. To help men of this type,
the "Y" has erected a hotel in which
men nay secrue good beds at a small
price."
With the idea of securing men to,
enter the "Y" college Professor Foster,
came to Ann Arbor yesterday. The
"Y" college is unique. There are
only two institutions of this kind in
the world. The other one is located
at Springfield, Mass., and devotes-more
of its time to physical training. The
building cost $350,000 and when fin-
ished will cost half a million. It is
conveniently located near the campus
of the University of Chicago, so that
students may take courses in the un-
iversity. , The total enrollment up to
date is 175 men.
University Safe
on Supply of Coal
Superintendent Lyman R. Flook of
the buildings and grounds department,
stated yesterday that the crisis in the
coal shortage is over for the time being
at least, and that the aspect for the rest
of the semester presents no serious,
difficulty..
"We are as well situated for coal as
any other institution that we know
of," said Mr. Flook, "and although we
have not more than a few weeks' sup-
ply on hand at any one time we al-
ways have enough to fill our needs."
The break in the cold weather fol-,
lowed by a number of warm days has
greatly reduced the amount of coal
necessary to furnish the University
buildings with heat and light, and ad-
vancing spring will bring even more
relief. As the days lengthen the num-
ber of kilowatts of electricity necess-
ary for light can be cut down, also
causing a reduction in the coal nec-
essary for this purpose.
Freshman girl of good appearance
for educational work, $80 per month,
guaranteed for summer. Address Free
Employment Bureau, 600 E. Liberty in
own hand writing. tfa

"Fact, without relation to other
things, cannot exist," said Prof. Rob-
ert M. Wenley in his lecture on "Dog-
ma and Fact" yesterday afternoon at
St. Andrews Episcopal church.
"Too much that we call fact is often
mere dogma.aDogma is an attitude
adapted to facts, and while it is a
statement] or proposition conveying
new information, it is usually without
backing. Dogma is not a source of
information but a-means of resetting
information to make it clear and in-
dubitable in some one direction.
"Probably one of the best examples
of the dogmatic proposition is evolu-
tion. We speak of it in all our sciences
and professions, yet do not attempt
to explain just what it is. Until we
can define it, much of the framework
of modern thinking will be doubtful.
"On the other hand, fact is an oc-
currence in the sensuous world which
commends itself to mankind. Relig-
ion is not composed of facts but rather
of interpretations or dogmas. Relig-
ion first interpreted how God came
to man, and now it tells how God has
continued to come to man.
"When we have accepted' religion
we are confronted by the question-
'Is the God of religion the God of
philosophy?' Philosophy demands
unity whether it be personal or other
wise Religion demands a personal
object. Without doubt the two lines
converge, but whether they meet or
not is the question which has given
rise to the various creeds."
J. H. ADmIS,'18, SCARLET FEVER
PATIENT, TAKEN TO HOSPITAL
Sigma Chi Quarantine Is Removed;
Chi Psi's Will Be Out
This Week
J. H. Adams, '18, who was quaran-
tined for scarlet fever last Monday
at the Sigma Chi house, was taken to
the contagious ward of the University
hospital Thursday morning. The fra-
ternity house was fumigated Thursday
afternoon and the confined inmates
were let out.
At the Chi Psi house, Phillips B.
Preston, '17, another scarlet fever vic-
tim, is forced to stay in his room be-
cause of the lack of beds at the con-
tagious ward of the University hos-
pital. The fraternity is still quaran-
tined, but the patient will be removed
by the end of the week.
NEW YORK MAYOR ADVOCATES
TRAINING FOR PREPAREDNESS
Princeton, N. J., March 15.-"Uni-
versal military training is the only
truly democratic solution to the prob-
lem of preparedness on land," said
Mayor Mitchell of New York, who
spoke here last night. "What is neces-
sary is an awakening of a sense of
duty among the citizens of the United
States."
35 Freshmen Turn Out for Glee Club
About 35 freshmen were present at
the meeting held last night in Mason
hall for the purpose of organizing a
Freshman Glee club. It was decided
to hold practices weekly, and to elect
a business manager and librarian. Rex
St. Clair, '19E, was in charge of the
meeting.

i

WANT ADITIONA EL
TD KEEP INFIRMARY

WOMEN
WITH

WISH TO CO-OPERATE
ALUMNAE AND BOARD
OF REGENTS

To increase the tuition for women
of the University, by an additional

EXPLAINS RELATIONSHIP OF
LIGION AND DOGMA
TO FACT

Hamilton Bd i College
State and Yflam

I

THE
Varsity Toggery
SHOP
1107 So. Univ.!
The Greeks idry
wear T'hem-B ut-

N OW is the time to place
your order f o r that
Spring Suit.
We offer sport styles and
business styles in all wool
fabrics.

Typewriting
Multigphing
gme.asahing

TYPEWRITERS
For Rent or Sale

Easter
Su its

PUBLISHED BY
The American Law Book Co,
27 Cedar Street
NEW YORK.

TALBOT
W ROW,
form ftCOLLARS
are curve cut to fit the
shoricrs perfctty e
Cktcw Feabody Co:Inc. Makcrs

RE-

KENTUCKY CLUB BANQUETS AT Michigan. After graduating, Dr. Gor-
RENELLEN HOSPICE TONIGHT dontpracticed in Flint, Flushing,
Swartz Creek, and Detroit. It is said
A banquet will be given by the Ken- that his death was due to an injury
he received in an automobile accident
tucky club at 7 o'clock this evening aer d ago
in the Renellen Hospice. In accord- a year__g_._
ance with the general custom of the 'MISS MIRIAM WOODBERRY TO
club, the affair will be of an informal SPEA AOU IBE R ATS
nature. Dean Effinger and Mr. Wal-
ter F. Marsteller of the economics de- . .
partment will be present and quite Iiss Miriam' Woodberry, secretary
likely they will each be. called on toof the Women's department of the
give short talks. The banquet is be- Congregational Home Missionary so-
ing managed by ° Yancey Altscheler, ciety, will speak at 7:30 o'clock this
'17. Every member of the club is evening in the auditorium of the
ur ed to be presentr First Congregational church. Her sub-
urgedect will relate to immigrant problems.
Following the lecture Robert Die-
LATE DR. G. G. GORDON CLASS- terle, '18, will sing, and the ladies of
MATE OF DEAN V. C. VAUGHAN the church will serve light refresh-
ments in the parlors. The public is
Dr. George G. Gordon, '78, of De- cordially invited.
troit, who died recently, was a class-
mate of Dean Victor G. Vaughan at Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.
LASS IFI. LenseCopy'
at at
Es andRTiSI Students'
DeBlta Supply Store
A D VE RTI S INGO

fee of $2.50, is the sunstance of a
petition being made by the Women's
league to the board of regents. Of
the proposed additional fee, $2.00 will
go toward the maintenance of an in-
firmary for women, and 50 cents for
membership in the league.
Besides the house, heat, light, and
janitor service which have been prom-
ised by the board of regents for an
infirmary, the alumnae have raised
$1,500, and have pledged $2,000 more
toward the establishment of such an
institution.
By means of the increased tuition,
the infirmary would be self-maintain-,
ing. The women's health service
would be removed to the same build-
ing, and three nurses and a cook
would be added to the present staff.
Ten beds would be provided, and any
woman would have the privilege of
going to the infirnary for two weeks
free of charge. However, women
would not be debarred from the Uni-
versity hospital for clinical work.
JMore Seats Gwo on
Sale for Festival
Block "B" of May Festival tickets
will go on sale at 8 o'clock tomorrow
morning at the box office in Hill audi-
torium. This section includes all re-
maining seats in sections 1 and 5
(two side sections) on the main floor,
the last nine rows of the first bal-
cony, together with the first eight
rows of the second balcony. The
price for these tickets will be $5.50
each, or $2.50 each if pre-festival
coupon is returned.
On Monday, March 26, all remain-
ing seats in this block will be reduced
50 cents to $5.00 and $2.00 respective-
ly.
TOTEM CLUB MIEMBERS PLAN
VACATION DANCE IN DETROIT
The Totem club, an organization of
alumni from Detroit Eastern 3 high'
school, held a meeting at 7 o'clock last
night in Mason hall. Many matters
were discussed, including the dance to
be given in the Knights of Columbus
hall in Detroit during Easter vaca-
tion and also the banquet which will
be given in the near future.
A report on the extension work of
the club was given. his work consists
of sending down two of the club mem-
bers every three weeks to Eastern
high where they speak on the different
courses in the University and what the
University has to offer. This h-s been
instrumental in bringing a great. ium-
ber of Eastern high graduates to
Michigan.
Special opening for experienced San-
itary Brush man. Phone 359-M. tf'
Try a Michigan Daily Want-Ad.

No, the Greeks did not wear pants,
but-well, to make a long story short,
pants did exist in their time, and were
worn in ancient historic times' by the
great Asiatic people, called the Scyth-
ians. Some valuable "pointers" aside
from this fact will be brought to light
when the Classical club players pres-
ent "Iphigenia among the Taurians,"
next week in Hill auditorium.
It is the general opinion that the
classical ages were a trouserless time,
and that the Greeks and Romans, con-
tenting themselves with garments de-
signed upon the general lines of Moth-
er Hubbard were unable to boast of
the sartorial glory of the masculine
half of human kind.
This, in a measure, is true, for while
the Greek had his chiton and the
Roman his toga, there seems to be no
mention of the scissor-like comple-
ment of male apparel, known as trous-
ers. However, the scene of the "lphi-
genia" is laid in the land of the Scyth-
ians who, in the matter of tailoring
style, may be regarded as our an-
cestors, for in ancient pictorial
representations of their nation, they
appear in the comely leg bandages. In
the play they are escorts of their
king, Thoas, and the campus will have
the opportunity to compare the styles
of 400 B. C. with those of today.
Urge Engineers to Order Invitations
All senior engineers who wish to
order invitations are urged to do so
immediately as no orders can be taken
after March 25. The invitations con-
tain the names of all seniors who will
graduate in June, summer school, or
February. Orders can be placed with
T. W. Sheahan in the Engineering so-
ciety rooms from 11 to 12 o'clock on
Monday, 9 to 10 o'clock on Tuesday
and Thursday, 5 to 5:30 o'clock on
Wednesday, 8 to 9 o'clock on Fri-
day.
Film Depicts Making of Iron Pipe
Motion pictures" to depict every
phase of iron ore mining, transporting,
and manufacturing into pipe, will be
shown at 7:30 o'clock Monday even-
ing, March 19, in the Natural Science
auditorium, under the auspices of the
student branch of the A. S. M. E. The
films are of popular interest and the
public is invited to attend. Admis-
sion free.
For live, progressive, up-to-date ad
vertfsing use The Michigan Daily.
For results advertise in The Michi-
gan Daily.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.

___._
..... .w ..r .

.--.

MISCELLANEOUS
THE RUBY GARAGE has 3 features{
worth while-fire proof, ease of con-
struction, reasona'le price. Call for
T. W. Peck, Phone 2361=.W. 15-7
FOR SALE
FOR SALE- Good typewriter, cheap.
Call 502 E. Liberty, 1038-M. 13-4-5-6

LOBT
LOST-A white English terrier pup,
one brown ear, long tail, no collar.
Call 355. 16
WANTED
WANTED-Lady for educational work
in Saginaw, this summer. $240.
Phone 359-M. 15-6-7

Our Great Co-operative Sale ot
Pianos and Player Pianos
Will save you Money
Beautiful New Grand Pianos
$460.00 Time Payment

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

'I

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