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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 15, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-HIGAN I

A 7

i

April 8th
Prepare Now

I

Make your selection from our vast assortment of distinctive
weaves and colorful blends.

G.H.
Leading Merchant Tailors

Wild Company
STATE STREET

Choice SelectionotPlace Cards
and Dance Programs

The Slater
Phone 430
STOP AT
TUT TLE'
338 S. STATE
for sodas and lunches
GEORGE BISCHOFF
FLORI1ST
Choice Cut Flowers and Plants
20 Chapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M

Book Shop
336 S. State St.
Special Sale of Cosmetics and Switches
Special Ten Day Weave
BEAUTY SHOP
miss Mabel Rowe
Shampooing, Manicuring, Massaging and Chiropody
Phone 2402 503 First National Bank Bldg
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, M ICH.
Capital $100,000 Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie

Official newspaper at the University of
Mir~igan. Published every morning except
14)nday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
t ) 8c" : Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier $2 yso b mail, $ ,00.
Want ad. stations: &uarry'; tudents' Supr-
ply Store; The Delta, car. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 96c; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words,
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library,,where the
notices are collected at 7:30 o clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker..........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn.................City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald.........Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jacksen......Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson... ..........Women's Editor
Carleton W. Read........Statistieal l ditt
J. E. Cam pbell. ..Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Fmery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert IE. Horns..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau... Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter. ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
C. M. tickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson . L. Zeigler
Reporters
H. C. Garrison James Schermerhorn
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. II. Fricken G. 0. Brophy
D. H. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
K. L. Wehmeyer J. P. Hart
Annetta L. Wood F. A. Taber
T. F. McAllister Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrewis, R. T. McDonald
C. L. Goldstein
Business Staff
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
Harold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. SmithBSeymour B. Wilson
Bernard Wohl
THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1917.
Night Editor--B. A. Swaney

TRY OUR

Fruit Rolls
Butter Creams

Mexican Fudge
Bitter Sweets

These are only a few of the Candy Specialties we
are offering. STRICTLY FRESH AND PURE.
The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - - LOCATION

Resources $3,800,000

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office- -
707 North University Ave.
be Farmers&Mechanics Bank
Offrs the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY - - -"EFFICIENCY
invenient and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
Pleased With Our Service. Two Offices
1-105 8. Main St. : 330 S. State St.
THE SUGAR BOWLI

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
m., :rio a. in. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:ro
P. M.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars--8:4 a. fn and
every two hours to 6:48 p. M.; to Lansing,
8:4 p. im.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
ter 7:4 P. n.
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m., 6:4o a
mn., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
tn., 8:05 p. In., 9:05 p. M., to:50 p. m. to
Ypsilanti only, 9:o a. m., 9:50 a. In., 2:05 p
Mn., 6:65 p. in., II :45 p. in., I:o a. in., 1:2
as. m.'}a Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Westbound----6:o5 a. m., 7:50 a.
13., Is:20 p. M.. 12:20 a. M.
Takes Pictures
* Develops Films
* makes Prints
and Enlarge-
713 E. UNI*VERSITY

Engineering

News

109 S. Main St.

SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES
Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.

a

Got a typewriter from
O. D. MOR R I L L
322 South State Street
He will furnish you an instruction
book free of oharge. You will be a
typist before you know it.
Mr. N. C. Fetter will address ves-
per service at 5 o'clock this afternoon
in Newberry hall on "The Silent
Force." Helen Bourke, '18, will pre-
side.
STUDY STRANGEJIS ANI) FEWER
BOOKS, SAYS JOURNALIS31 PRO F.
Seattle, March 14.-Prof. Colin V.
Dyment, head of the department of
journalism, urges that students make.
more of a study of the various lives
around them, according to the Wash-
?ngton Daily.
That students should not read in
trains and street cars, but should
spend their time in conversation with
str angers, is Professor Dyment's opin-
ion. This would give journalists a
bi oader view of life.
Library to Purchase British Papers
Purchase of the British parlia-
mentary papers from 1914 to 1916.
has been authorized by the LibraryI
committee. The Library will also en-
ter an annual subscription for the
documents from January, 1917. These
papers correspond to the papers is-
sued by congress. They will arrive
about June.
Dancing classes and private lessons
at the Packard Academy. tti

Prof. H. E. Riggs gave an interest-
ing account of the history of the en-
gineering school of Michigan and the
work of some of the more prominent
alumni in his talk before the fresh
engineer assembly yesterday morning.
His talk was limited mostly to
structural and transportation engi-
eering, giving some of the problems
that came to engineers and showing
how failures such as the Quebec
bridge accident not only cost the en-
gineer his reputation, but caused mil-
lions of dollars loss and the loss of
the lives of 155 men.
In the business meeting before the
talk by Professer Riggs, a letter was
read from E. C. Warriner, father of
Paul Warriner, thanking the 1920 en-
gineers for their flowers and sym-
pathy.
The chairman of the social commit-
tee reported that the dance which
has been under consideration for some
time would probably be held Friday
evening, March 30, in Barbour gym.
WOMEN TO MEET AT ANNUAL
LUNCHEON FOR THIRD TIME
For the third time in the history of
the Women's league, the women of
the campus will be given an oppor-
tunity to meet at the annual lunch-
eon at 12 o'clock Saturday, March 31,
in Barbour gymnasium.
Patriotism will be the watchword
among the speakers, and the decora-
tions will be suggestive of "Uncle
Sam." Following the luncheon, the
Junior play will give its first public
performance in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall.
Girls Major in Baseball at Oklahoma
Yorman, Okla., March 14.-Sliding
headfirst into second base is a com-
mon occurrence for the members of
the Uaiversity of Oklahoma girls'
baseball team. The girls meet for
practice every afternoon and have ac-
quired as much agility as their broth-
ers in the lingo of the diamond, as
well as in the complete execution of
its innumerable tricks.

A PREMIUM ON CLASS INTEREST
Almost every election of class of-
ficers on the campus in the past few
years has resulted in general dissat-
isfaction and thinly veiled charges of
peanut politics. Recrimination for
this state of affairs has been bandied
to and fro but it seems that the real
blame must eventually fall on the
electors rather than on the elected.
If there has been vote-swapping
and peanut politics in Michigan's class
elections, it is certainly a condition
to be regretted, but regret will not
remedy tthe situation. There must be
a. greater interest in the filling of
class offices by the great bulk of the
students. Meetings at which candi-
dates for these offices are nominated
are notoriously ill-attended. It is a
fact that a dozen votes will nine times
out of ten place a man in nomination.
When election time comes, less
than 30 per cent of the class appears
at the polls, thus in both cases mak-
ing the conditions most favorable for
railroading candidates into office. The
only way to break up government by
cliques is to have a large enough
electoratle to offset the qentralized
force of these smaller bodies.
If the Student council were to en-
act a resolution which recognized no
election or nomination as legal in
which a certain percentage of the
members of the class had not voted
and keeping such offices vacant until
candidates ;hod been so lnominated
and elected, much might be done to
make the path of the cheap politician
more difficult, if the percentage were
placed high enough.
In this way a premium would be
placed on the interest of the class.
If the class wanted organization, it
would be forced to earn it by turning
out a majority of its members.,at the
polls. If it can not stir up interest
it must suffer the penalty of being
without officers.
BE CAREFUL
In order to check the serious epi-
demic of scarlet fever and measles
which has filled the University hos-
pital's contagious ward and quaran-
tined two fraternity and several pri-
vate houses, students and others must
exercise extreme care.
No good reason for the epidemic
has been given beyond the fact that
an unusual number of cases are pre-;,
valent all over the country. Some of
the local cases are known to have
been contracted in Detroit. Health
authorities state that the drinking
water is safe, the darkened color be-
ing due to the heavy sediment from
surface drainage coincident with the

us sensational super-sophisticated
Slavic spies, but thrilling trackers of
titled Teutons.
Smallpox kept them out of Ypsi-
lanti and now scarlet fever is doing
its best to keep them out of Detroit.
And yet they say the life of a col-
lege man hath not trials and tribula-
tions.
With a combination of dancing and
basketball at its next party, the Wom-
en's league has come forth nobly to
solve the question of Michigan ath-
letics.
Oberlin seniors who make the grade
of B or better are to be excused from
examinations 'in June. But they
aren't the ones who are worrying.
FETTERDEFENDS POSTERS
SAYS PURPOSE OF PICTURES IS
EDUCATIONAL; SHOW WHAT
FOREIGN STUDENTS FACE.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
As one closely associated with the
Univeristy Y. M. C. A. I wish to say
a few things concerning the matter of
the war posters.
In the first place, I do not deny
the fact that to the author of "War
Poster Displeases" these mural decc
orations of the social room of the Un-
iversity Y. M. C. A. do make that
portion of Lane hall look like a re-
cruiting station for the British army.
His article gives evidence of that.
However, I would like to point out
that W. F. S., '18, while a very clear
writer, is not a good observer nor
an interpreter of the methods of the
association. On the walls of the social
room hang not only posters from Eng-
land and Canada, but also very artis-
tic posters from France. These later
are inscribed in French, and that may
be the reason for their not being un-
derstood. There are also two small
pictures portraying the German sold-
ier, one as he enjoys a short furlough,
the other as he stands on sentinel
duty on a cold winter day.
The posters were secured by the
architect of the building, who wrote
to the different consuls for them. It
was impossible to get from the Ger-
man consul anything more than the
two small pictures.
The purpose of the posters is edu-
cational. They suggest a bit of con-
temporary life in Europe, and portray
what students in the warring countries
are called upon to face. A little"useof
the imagination, added to a little com-
mon sense, ought to make it clear that
the association has no other aim in
view.
lowever, we are glad for the crit-
icism. It is at least straight-forward
and frank, and indicates no doubt
that the only way to remain neutral
these days is to say nothing, think
nothing, and do nothing.
We appreciate the criticism much
I more than the method used by a cer-
tain vandal who this week wantonly
attempted to destroy two of the post-
ers which are the property of the as-
sociation, aid in so doing committed
a state's prison offense. Unfortunate-
ly, or perhaps fortunately for him, he
did not sign his initials to his protest.
We venture to remark that the perpet-
rator of that act would be the last
one to volunteer to fight under his
own flag, and the first, if made a con-
script to run from the enemy.
N. C. FETTER, JR.
REPORT EXGEAD

ITALY HAS SUFFICIENT FOOD
THOUGH COAL SUPPLY IN THAT
COUNTRY IS SHORT.
Editor; The Michigan Daily:
In regard to the report from Wash-
ington of March 12, to the effect that
Italy is on her last legs, owing to
the food shortage, I beg to state that
the report is greatly exaggerated.
A letter received yesterday from a
relative in Italy states that coal sup-
ply is short, and sugar is also scarce,
but that all other food is plentiful,
though dear. They have two meatless
lays a week, and three days on which
the pastry shops are closed. Eggs
are plentiful now, and there is no lack
of fresh vegetables.
This relative quotes a letter from a
soldier at the front which states that
the treatment from superior officers
is -without reproach and the food is
plentiful and good. I am a subscriber
to the "Corriere Della Sera," an Italian
daily paper, and I find no mention of
a food shortage or any intention to
weaken toward Austria or Germany.
In fact, quite to the contrary.
IMOGEN R. REILLY.
Freshman girl of good appearance
for educational work, $80 per month
guaranteed for summer. Address Free
Employment Bureau, 600 E. Liberty in
own hand writing. tf

e
,.

We have just received a shipment of more than
.a
100 Tans acis
of the leading makes, including the
SLOTT D THROAT KACKET
U Gm i and ook them over
-
- VNIVERSITY B3OOKSTORES
(lIlIllIIIIIIIia IIillIlIlillill1 ,iIul imi l l IIIllItIlllllIIll iIliiilllli111
6 -
t)
C h r's plenty of
fren> 1-3 1c[ of sunshine- 0
B plnty '~uizca i- yo'Can get
VEL ny
tobaCci st

h

Leaveour DULL SafetyRazor
Blades to be SH"ARPENED with
William W. Behringer
11 N E ARCAD

r'

._

Mr. W. II. Tinker Visits i e a
Minneapolis, March .4.- Mr. W. I.
Tinker, former secretary of the Uni-
versity of Michigan Y. M. C. A., and
present university secretary for the
international committee of the Y. M.
C. A., is visiting here after a trip to
the Pacific coast.
I can duplicate any lens. J. L.
Chapman, Optrometrist and Jeweler,

Smallpox Scare Passes Minnesota
inneapohis, March 14.-The small-
ox ;ar at the University of Min-
nesota has passed its height and is
now on tke wane. Forty students who
had been exposed to it were forced to
undergo vaccination.
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
o, Leading Merchant Tailors. State
tf

F LO WE R S

M 294

213 E.I

Liberty St.

X y ~
" .i
t
;.'
. .

The Lad's "Batting" Record

Member of Florists' Telegraph
De rService
F wers by Wire to All the World.

was bad, says
the note from
Prexy to Papa
-whichreferred
of course to the
"bats" that de-
stroy the body
and break down
the thinking
machinery. The
only cure is back
to the simple
life and

J .! y j
y ? n
J "'' - . _
,"
,a

Shredded Wheat
the food that puts you on your feet when
everything else fails. A daily diet of
Shredded Wheat means clear thinking
and quick acting. It leaves the body
strong and buoyant and the brain in
condition to tackle the problems of study
or play. It is on the training table of
nearly every college and university
in this country and Canada. Two
Shredded Wheat Biscuits with milk
or cream supply more real body-
building nutriment than meat or eggs
at one-fourth the cost.

thawing season.
In a large university community
where persons contir;uly ieet in
large groups, every preaution hod
be taken to prevent the fer spr .
of a contagious disse, - udents
should keep their tndy and hA room
suites well ventile=d. an. university
authorities should insist that class
and lecture rooms be filled with fresh
air.
Soon movies will no longer offer

Made only by
The Shredded Wheat Company,

Niagara Falls, N. Y.

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