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March 15, 1917 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-15

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HE WEATHER
PROODABLY SNW
TOl) Y

Ar ikrn D

UNITED
DAY AND
WIRE SE

NwAqw

PRESS
ERVICE

I-

VOL. XXVII. No. 115. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENTS

t

CgANAL CgAN RESIST
NAVAL ATTACKll IS
GOETHALS' OPINION
DiEFENSE Of -11, DITCH" AMPLY
BUILDER
ADMITS GREAT LACK
O F FOOD SUPPLIES

'TAU BETA PI TAKES
IN HONOR MEMBERS

Major-General G. W. Goethals
iiated by Engineering Fra-
ternity Last Night

In.

Constructive
Way
"I do not

Features of Giant Water-
D(ewonstrated in
Lecture
look for a strong naval

development against the Panama
canal in the event of war being de-
clared against the United States. The
experiences of the United States in our
attacks on San Juan and Santiago
and the more recent naval actions by
the British in the Dardenelles, con-
clusively proves that sea coast de-
fenses are not in danger of being over-
whelmed by a naval attack," said Ma-
jor-General George W. Goethals in
characterizing the military situation
on the Panama. canal, in his speech,
"Some Constructive Features of the
Panama Canal," delivered last night
in Hill auditorium.
Defense Provided For
According to General Goethals, the
defense of the canal has been amply
provided for by the government, the
armament being stronger and more
powerful than that possessed by any
other nation, notwithstanding the fact
that the 14-inch guns and 12-inch mor-
tars were constructed in the United
States. A garrison of 9,000 troops is
stationed on the canal zone, and if the
naval experts are correct in their be-
lief that the largest force that any
nation could hope to land for use
against the canal is 5,000, no fear need
be entertained said General Goethals
for the safety of the waterway.
Although believing that military pre-
cautions were sufficient to withstand
any attack, General Goethals admitted
that there was a grievous lack of sup-
plies, and asserted, that in the event
of war the U. S. could not hope
to hold the waterway unless provision
had been made for the storing of sup-
plies. At the present time there was
meat sufficient to last three months,
but of other supplies only enough for
one month. General Goethals also
claimed that we lacked aeroplanes.
Construction Shown
The constructive features of the
giant waterway, the workings of the
double lock system in use in the Gat-
un and Pedro Miguel locks, the huge
drydock, able to accommodate the
largest battleship afloat, and views of
the coaling stations that have been
built on both coasts to aid in the fuel
provision of war ships were shown in
the slides with which General Goethals
illustrated his lecture.
Slides, accidents, and explosions all
hindered the project, the explosions
often resulting in the loss of life. The
slides, which have not yet ended in
the canal, proved the most trouble-
some and often necessitated much ad-
ditional excavation.
THEATER REHEARSAL
Opera Cast to Be Given First Taste
of Footlights Tonight
Last night, for the second time, the
cast and chorus of "Fools' Paradise"
ran through their parts together, this
time not a hitch marring the entire
presentation.
Starting with tonight and continu-
ing until the initial performance Wed-
nesday night, rehearsals will be held
at- the Whitney theater. This will give
the men an opportunity to become
thoroughly acquainted with the stage
and the glare of the foot lights.
Word was received yesterday from
the Van Horn company of Philadelphia
that the costumes had been shipped
and they are expected to arrive in Ann
Arbor today.
Yesterday's seat sale was second
only to that of Monday, yearly mem-
bers of the Union getting their tickets
yesterday. The sale this afternoon
will be open to yearly members, and
those desiring seats who have not as
yet procured them are urged to do. so
at this time, as the general seat sale
opens Saturday morning-at the Whit-

Tan eta Pi, the national honor
engineering fraternity, held the most
successful initiation in the history of
Michigan Gamma chapter yesterday
afternoon when Major-General George
W. Goethals, Lyman F. Moorehouse,
'97E, Sutton Van Pelt, '98E, and Prof.
John C. Parker, '01E, honorary mem-
bers, and 11 junior engineers were
taken into the organization.
The ritual ceremonies were held at
4 o'clock in the engineering library
and were followed by a formal ban-
quet in Barbour gymnasium at which
occasion T. W. Sheahan, '17E, acted
as toastmaster. General Goethals
was the principal speaker of the even-
ing. H. A. Taylor, '17E, extended the
welcome of the chapter to the newly
elected members and W. B. Sickler,
'18E, responded for the initiates. Prof.
L. M. Gram of the engineering fac-
ulty also spoke. It is estimated that
105 men were present at the affair,
64 of whom were local and out-of-
town alumni.
MEETING Of RAIL EDS
MAY PRECIPITATE STRIKE
NEITHER SIDE SHOWS INDICA-
TION OF INTENT TO
YIELD
New York, March 14.-The railway
managers' committee and the railway
brotherhoods' chiefs held separate
meetings in New York this afternoon
preparing for the joint session tomor-
row, which may precipitate the pro-
gressive nation-wide strike starting ir
the East Saturday.
In neither camp was there any in-
dication of intent to yield, the brother-
hoods standing pat on the demand for
operation of the Adamson eight-hour
law, and the employers refusing to act
until the supreme court renders its de-
cision on the law.'
May Make Statement
At railroad headquarters, where it
was reported the managers were for-
mulating their program,. it was said
they might have a statement later in
the lay. The brotherhood chiefs met
in a hall on the lower east side with,
chairmen of their organizations on
eastern roads.
The 19 railroad managers, repre-
senting 250 railroads, met in the Grand,
Central terminal building. Elisha Lee,
chairman of the committee, said he
was "always hopeful for a settlement,"
but the railway heads were understood
to be drawing a blunt refusal of the
trainmen's demands.
Government Control Brought Up
Statements of brotherhood leaders
to the effect that if the public is op-
posed to a strike the president would
seize the roads and put the federal
eight-hour law in operation, were the
basis of charges by their opponents
that the strike leaders hope to force
government ownership.
Unanimous endorsement of the pro-
gram submitted by the big four broth-
erhoods was announced late today at
the meeting of representatives of the
various groups of trainmen. +This
gives the leaders the solid backing of
the inen in their plan for a progre'-
sive strike to be effective probably
Saturday if no arrangement is reached
in the meantime.
SCHERMERHORN TO COMPETE
IN PEACE CONTEST FRIDAY'
Michigan will participate in the
seventh annual state peace contest on
Friday night, March 16, in Pease audi-
torium, Ypsilanti, when James Scher-
irhorn Jr., '18, this year's repre-

sentative, will deliver his oration,
"The Course of Empire."
Five speakers from as many schools
in Michigan will contest. The winner
will receive a testimonial of $75, and
will represent the state of Michigan
in the next elimination contest to be
held in April.
Prof. R. M. Wenley to Lecture Today
"Dogma and Fact" will be the theme1
of Prof. R. M. Wenley's lecture this
afternoon in St. Andrew's Episcopal1
church at 4:30 o'clock. This is the1
third lecture in a series on the gen-

LAUNCH CAMPIGN TO
INCREASE NAVAL RESERVE
MAJOR-GENERAL GOETHALS AND
LIEUT. LUNDY ADDRESS
'VOLUNTEERS
Ancampaign to increasevthe enroll-
ment of the Michigan naval reserve
from 110 to 150 was launched last
night by the officers of the organiza-
tion, acting under instructions from
battalion headquarters, when the en-
listed men were addressed by Major-
General Goethals, and Lieutenant
Commander Chas. B. Lundy of De-
troit, in the lecture room of the Na-
tural Science building.
Major-General Goethals spoke to
the men for a few minutes before lec-
turing in Hill auditorium. He ex-
pressed his pleasure at seeing the men
present and said he wished their num-
ber might be increased. Lieut. Com-
mander Lundy explained the need for
men of the University type and the op-
portunities for national service by the
local reserve units. Lieut. Command-
er Lundy is the executive officer of
the First Battalion of the Michigan
Naval Milita.
Inspect Volunteers
The immediate occasion for the en-
largement of the University divisions,
along with the other units of the
naval forces of the state, is the na-
tional emergency now existing. With-
in two weeks a board of federal and
state officers will inspect the organ-
ization and examine officers and men
preparatory to incorporating them into
the National Naval Volunteers. It is
desired by the authorities that these
divisions should be at full war.
strength.
In explaining the status of the Un-
iversity divisions, and the work that.
already has been accomplished, Lieu-
tenant J. R. Hayden, commanding the
8th Division, in an interview, pointed
out that although the present enlisted
men were mustered in on January 10
last, they had drilled for some three
months prior to that date, six weeks
last spring and a like period before
the Christmas holidays. "We feel
therefore," he said, "that our organiza-
tion has reached the point at which we
can handle efficiently and assimilate
quickly 20 recruits in each division."
Are Units in Battalion
As to the place of these divisions
in the armed forces of Michigan and
of the United States, Lieutenant Hay-
den stated that at present they are
units in the first battalion, Michigan
(Continued on Page Five)
INLANDER OUT SOON
Lightness to Characterize March Is-
sue of Magazine
For its March number, which will
appear on the campus about Friday,
March 23, the Inlander will offer
rather more of the purely literary
than it has served to its readers so
far this year. Articles of a conten-
tious nature are lacking, yet the
poems, stories, and essays of the
lighter type, will make up this de-
ficiency.
Prof. Willard T. Barbour of the Law
school, has contributed an article on
undergraduate life at Oxford. Al-
though the history of the ancient in-
stitution of learning is touched upon,
as well as some of the present day
aspects, the whole presents a vivid
picture, more impressionistic than de-
tailed.

Lightness is the element most mark-
ed throughout the table of contents,
only a few pages of editorials taking
up in serious wise important ques-
tions now at issue.
DEUlTSCHER VEREfN GIVES
ONE ACT PLAYLET TONIGHT
The Deutscher Verein will meet at
3 o'clock tonight in the society's
rooms. The program will consist of a
one act playlet whica has been pre-
pared for the occasion by s:me of the
members.
Applicants for membership will be,
wscu:sed by the executive board,
which meets at 7 o'clock.
Dr. A. G. Hall to Run for Alderman.
Dr. Arthur G. Hall, registrar of the,
University, was nominated to run on,
the Democratic ticket for alderman of
the Seventh ward in the coming elec-
tion to be held April 4. Mr. Charles
A. Sink was nominated by the Re-

GOVERNMENT TAKING
ALL POSSIBLE STEPS
Administration's Belief of Unchanged
Teuton Policy Confirmed
by Action
Washington, March 14.-The sink-
ing of the American ship Algonquin
unwarned by a submarine confirmed
today the administration's belief that
Germany would carry on her "ruth-
lessness" against American shipping,
but, for the moment, it does not alter
the general situation.
The sinking convinced authorities
that they have nothing to hope for in
the way of modified procedure on Ger-
many's part. While there was gen-
eral agreement that the Algonquin
case does not mean war at present,
state department officials regarded the
incident as extremely serious.
The general view, however, was
that despite the overt character of the
case, this government for the present
is taking all the steps it can through
its ship armament policy. Affidavits
from members of the crew of the Nor-
wegian steamer Scorstad cabled to the
state department today confirmed pre-
vious reports that Germany utterly
disregarded the Belgian reief flag
when she sunk the vessel without
warning.
CHINA BREAKS TEUTON
DIJMAlC RLTIONS
SEIZES GERMAN MERCHANT VES-
SELS IN SHANGAI
- HARBOR
Washington, March 14.-Diplomatic
relations between China and Germany
were broken by China today, accord-
ing to an official message to the navy
department.
The Chinese government has seized
the German merchant vessels in
Shanghai harbor, and the crews have
been sent ashore. Armed guards have
been placed aboard the vessels. The
message came from the senior naval
commander in Chinese waters.
China is expected to help supply the
allies from her enormous store of
metals and her munition factories.
The German vessels seized were small
boats which had been interned for
many months. Shortly after receiving
the- navy message, the- state depart-
ment received the following message
from Minister Reinsch:
"China has broken off diplomatic
relions with Germany. The German
minister will be handed his pass-
ports today."
The break represents a complete
change in sentiment from that which
existed in China at the start of the
war when the population was gen-
erally pro-German. As a result of the
break, China will probably obtain the
extension or remittance of the Boxer
indemnities along with several other
concessions she has greatly desired.
ENGLISH SHIP SUNK
Vessel East Point Torpedoed Without
Warning March 9
Washington, March 14.--The British
steamer East Point was torpedoed off
Eddystone lighthouse March 9 without
warning, according to a message to
the state department from the Ameri-
can consul at Plymouth. The entire
crew was saved.

A ,esssge from Consul Frost at
Queenstowii -Lqnld of the kiling of five
British, and the narrow escape from
death 'f one American, John W. Vin-
cent, Oak Bluff, Mass., hi the torpedo-
ing of the Leland trader Norwegian.
Duchess of Connaught Dies in London
London, March 14.-The Duchess of
Connaught died here this evening.

SINKING LEAVES SITUATION
ALTERED FOR THE
MOMENT

UN-

UNITED STATES STEAMER ALGONQUiN FALLS VICTIM
TO GERMAN SUBAIE"RUTHLESSNESS"1 VESSEL IS
ATTACKED WITHOUT WARNING1 ENTIRE CHEVY SAVED

PROF. REEVES SAYS
SINKING OVERT ACT
United States' Entry Into War De-
pends on Wilson's Interpreta.-
tion, He Declares
-"The sinking of the American ship
Algonquin is an act of war against
the United States," said Prof. Jesse S.
Reeves, head of the department of
political science yesterday.
"No declaration of war on our part
is necessary for the president to take
steps with reference to a further de-
fense of this country," said the pro-
fessor. "The fact that no lives were
lost is a happy one, but the sinking
of the vessel is just as much an act
of war as it would have been had a
large number of lives been lost, and
I believe the president will take steps
to speed up the mobilization of the
navy, and possibly of the army as
well.
"The fact that congress. is not in
session will in no way hinder Presi-
dent Wilson, although, of course,
without congress in session the United
States could not declare war. The
president has already authorized the
arming of all vessels that are to sail,
and before that he had broken off
diplomatic relations with Germany.
All that is left for him to do is to
issue a call for mobilization, and I
look for an immediate speeding up of
all mobilization. It is within the
power of the president to construe the
act of Germany as an act of war,"
continued Professor Reeves. "His in-
terpretation of the act may or may
not so construe it. The entrance of
the United States into the war de-
pends o President ~avsn's inter-
pretation of the act, which is undoubt-
edly overt."
AETNA POWDER CO.
BLAST KILLS SIX
Loss Is $800,000; Think Explosion
May Be Result of
Plot
Clean, New York,. March 14.-Six
men were killed in an explosion in
the Aetna Explosive company's plant
at Emporium, Pa., near here, today.
The building was destroyed with a
loss of about $800,000.
While the building was burning, fire
broke out in the cotton storage plant
of the company about a quarter of a
mile from the recovery plant. The
two fires following each other so
closely lead to the suspicion here that
they were the result of a plot.'
SENATE COMMITTEE REPORTS
FAVORABLY ON DR. GRAYSON
Washington, March 14.-The sen-
ate naval affairs committee today or-
dered a favorable report on the nom-
ination of Doctor Carey T. Grayson to
be medical director of the navy, with
rank of rear-admiral. This action was
taken by a party vote, the Republicans
on the committee opposing the con-
firmation. It is expected that Doctor
Grayson will be confirmed in a short
time.
ALL-FRESH MANDOLIN CLUB
TRYOUTS HELD TONIGHT
Tryouts for the All-fresh Mandolin
club will be held at 7 o'clock tonight
in room 205 north wing, with the
object of securing men who may
be trained for next year's Varsity
club. Those who have already had
experience in team work with the
freshman club will be given prefer-
ence. A violin, 'cello, saxaphone, and

flute is needed. Rex St. Clair, '19F
will be in charge of the meeting.
ELECTRIC TRAIN ACCIDENT
KILLS ONE, INJURES FIVE
Fort Wayne, March 14.-On3 man
was killed and five other persons were
injured, two probably fatally, today
when an outgoing Bluffton electric
passenger car was struck by a freight
train about two miles south of here.
The dead man was believed to be Carl
Thompson of Bluffton.

Sub

Comes to Surface Upon Finding
Boat Unarmed; Crew Loses
BelongIngsa

By Ed L. Keen
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
London, March 14.--The American
steamer Algonqui fell victim Monday
to the ruthless submarine warfare.
All of her crew of 27 were saved,
according to official advices received
by the American embassy from the
American consul at the port where
they landed.
The Algonquin was attacked with-
out warning by shell fire from the
German U-boat. After her crew had
taken to the life boats the German
commander sent a detachment of his
men aboard the Algonquin. They set
bombs, which sunk the ship. The
submarine opened fire from a point
three miles distant from the Algon-
quin and fired 20 shells at the first
fusilade.
When appealed to, the submarine
commander refused the request of the
survivors to tow the lifeboats, and,
departed, leaving the Algonquin crew
to their fate. :Captain Norderg of the
Algonquin reported today that his ship
was attacked at daybreak.
Crew Loses Belongings
Four, of the fusilade of shells di-
rected at the Algonquin struck her
forward. At that time the weather
was bad, and no vessels were in sight.
The crew of the Algonquin lost all
their belongings and suffered consid-
erable from exposure in lifeboats.
Captain Norderg also remarked that
after firing a round of shells, the Ger-
man U-boat came up close to the Al-
gonquin and circled around her sev-
eral times,rapparentlysighting
through the periscope for arms. Find-
ing the ship without guns the sub-
marine came to the surface. Af-
fidavits of Captain Norderg and mem-
bers of his, crew are to be cabled -to
Washington.
Vessel Unarmed
New York, March 14.-The Ameri-
can Star line, owners of the subma-
rined American steamer Algonquin,
today declared the vessel was not
armed. Line officials said there were
27 men in the crew. At least 11 were
Americans.
The Algonquin was formerly in lake
traffic, and was put in trans-Atlantic
service when the demand for bottoms
became so great that many lake ships
were bought for such a purpose. The
cargo was valued at $1,500,000.
Lloyd's lists the Algonquin as reg-
istered from Port Arthur, Ont., as a
steel steamer of 1,806 tons. When
she was transferred to the American
Star line she was put under American
registry and flew the American flag.
Professor Bonner to Address Club
Prof. CampbellBonner of the Greek
department, will address the Classical
club at 8 o'clock this evening in the
lecture room of Memorial hall. After
the regular meeting, an informal so-
cial will be held in the basement.
Professor Bonner will discuss the
Greek play "Iphigenia Among the
Taurians," in regard to its period,
dramatic technique, and plot. He will
also compare this play of Euripides
with Goethe's "Iphigenie."
The Sodalitas Latina of Ypsilanti,
will attend in a body. All active and
associate members, who, expect to at-
tend, are requested to notify Ruth
Kelsey, phone 114, before noon today.
1mr. -Fetter to Address Women
Mr. N. C. Fetter, of the Y. M. C. A.,
w ill speak to University women on
the subject, "The Silent Force," at 5
o'clock today in Newberry hall. Mr.
Fetter gave this adc ross last year. be-
fore a large audi-nce of University
wo en, and has been asked to re-
peat it at the regular m eekly vesper

service for this week.
Helen M. Bourke, '18, newly elected
presient of the Y. W. C. A. will
preside at the meetia;.

SHIP SET UPON BY SHELL FIRE
AND BLOWN UP WITH
BOMBS
COMMANDER REFUSES
TOW TO LIFEBOAT

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