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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 10, 1917 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



I

b

I

SPRING
SHOWING

Calkins

IT might pay you to talk
with us about exchanging
your old Kodak for a new
model or one with a better

Cordovan s
We have just received

Drug

another

Co.

shipment of

lens,

308 So. State

or 1123 So. Univ. Ave.

this popular shoe in
BLACK and TAN.
Special Agncy Nettleton shoes

of the new

Smrt

I

HARVIRD ANOPRINCETON
.EAD IN WAR THNING
FORMER COLLEGE HAS 1,100 MEN
ENROLLED IN MILITARY
CORPS

TELESCOPE BRINGS NEW
INFORMATION OF STARS
OBSERVATORY MAKES 3,700 SPEC.
TROGRAMS SINCE MAY
OF 1911
Productive results have marked the

WAHRS Shoae Stores

$20 to $40

Lindenschmidt, Apfel Co.

r

At Fourth Ave. and Liberty St.
Laboratory Supplies

Chemicals - Drugs

-

Toilet Articles

and Drug Sundries
The Eberbach & Son Co.

..

t
moon"

What about that
Suit for Spring

New

Ithaca, N. Y., March 9.-A summary
of the progress made by the various
eastern colleges toward preparing for
warfare discloses the fact that Har-
vard and Princeton lead in the matter
of extensive military preparation,
with Yale, Dartmouth, Columbia, and
Michigan second in the same direction.
Harvard has almost 1,100 men en-
rolled in its reserve officers' training
corps and other departments organ-
ized as aero, naval coast patrol, and
naval training divisions. These men
will go into a training camp during
July and August, and are expected to
be ready to take commissions in the
reserve army by September.
Princeton has 850 men drilling, di-
vided into eight companies. An aero
branch has been created, which has
in prospect the obtaining of aeroplane
dummies for instruction in the prac-
tical manipulation of the aeroplane.
Columbia has not as yet undertaken
any actual drilling, and does not ex-
pect to unless there be an actual dec-
laration of war, but it is collecting en-
rollments and organizing, so that in
case war is declared all the prelim-
inary steps toward the introduction of
military training will be complete.
Dartmouth, also, refuses to take any
hasty step, and is waiting for a dec-
laration of war before it begins pre-
paring. A battalion was organized at
that university last year, but it was
not revived this year.
Michigan, as we know, has about
150 men drilling, and is waiting the
arrival of a regular army officer be-
fore that 150 are to become the nucleus
of a larger body.
Yale has organized a unit for ex-
tensive work in military science and
those enrolled are being instructed in
military matters.
STANDARD OIL OFFERS MANY
PLACES TO SINGLE STUDENTS
Salaries for Field Positions Placed at
$2,000, With Smaller Pay
at Start

We have some beauties at $20,$22.50 and $25
made to your measure by the Royal Tailors of
Chcago.
Drop in and look them over wheither it be a
New or Staple Pattern we have it.
Camu s Bootery
308 S. State St. Opposite Huston's
Bostonian and Florsheim Shoes
(NEW SPRING STYLES)

a experiments of the astronomy depart-
ment in the work of photographing and
enlarging the 3spectra of the stars
r This investigation has been one of the
chief aims of the department since the
completion of the reflecting telescope
in May, 1911, and more than 3,700
spectrograms have been made which
with few exceptions are suitable for
exact measurement.
The reflecting telescope, constructed
under the supervision of Prof. Wil-
liam J. Hussey, director of the as-
tronomical observatory, has an aper-
ture of 37 1-2 inches and a focal length
of 60 feet. The spectrograph is at-
tached to the lower end. By means
of a special apparatus upon one of
the two concrete foundations of the
telescope it may be trained on a star
and a time clock moves it with a rota-
tion which compensates for the earth's
rotation so that the star is always in
the field of vision. The spectrographic
plate is exposed for a period varying
from one to eight or nine hours, de-
termined by the magnitude of the star.
This exposure must be under the di-
rect observation of a member of the
staff in order to correct any slight neg-
lect of the time clock to keep the star
always in view.
The plate with the impress of the
spectrum of the star is then enlarged
to about six or eight times its size in
the special instrument designed by
Prof. Ralph H. Curtiss. Two strong
nitrogen lamps enclosed in a square
case throw the image of the spectrum
through a lens and focal box and im-
press it upon a photographic plate at
the end. The length of the focal box
may be regulated at will 'so that any
desired enlargement may be obtained.
The exposure of the plate in the en-
larging instrument is determined in
length of time by an oil pump which
slides a box containing the plate be-
fore an aperture in the instrument at
any regulated speed. Prints are made
from these enlargements which- are
mounted in series on Bristol board and
photographed.
Results obtained by this process
have brought out characteristics in the
spectra of stars that have been hith-
erto unknown. The publication of the
observatory tat has been issued re-
cently contains a number of plates of
these photographed spectra which
have received the commendation of
many noted astronomers in this coun-
tr.
PLAN FOR ENINEERING
TRIP DURINGOVCTION
UNDECIDED WHETHER TO TRAVEL
WEST OR EAST THIS
YEAR
Plans for the annual engineering
trip during spring vacation are now
under way. Those in charge of the
trip are undecided whether to go east
or west and stated yesterday after-
noon that they would be glad to hear
from any who are planning to go in
regard to his choice.
The objections to the eastern trip
are that it is doubtful if the party
will be admitted to the ship building
yards and to the concerns manufac-
turing munitions in the east. The
cost is also about $25 more than the
western trip.
Prof. Y. E. Emswiler has written to
one of these concerns asking whether
or not such a party would be admitted.
As yet the letter has not been an-
swered. The eastern trip will take

i
,
3
::
1
CL
1
3
a
C
t

Pamphlet Distributed
hers of State
lature

Among
Legis-.

Mem-

MIa~yzaSt.
in Youngstown, Pittsburg, Washing-
ton, Baltimore, New York, Schenectady
and Niagara Falls and will cost be-
,tween $80 and $90.
The western trip will take in To-
ledo, Gary, Chicago, Keokuk, and St.
.Louis. The cost will be between $50
and $60. This trip is the shorter of
the two.
This trip is planned primarily for
Juniors but all others that wish may
go. All mechanical engineers think-
ing of going should communicate with
Professor Emswiler, all electricals
with Prof. H. S. Sheppard, and civils
with Mr. G. H. Cissel.
REGENTS URGE NEEDS
IN SPECIAL BULEI

Fitform Clothes

Containing the requests of the Uni-

State St.

I

One of Our Dinners
Served from 11 to 7
Regu'ar Dinner 35c consists choice of
meats; mashed or boiled potatoes; one
vegetable; choice of pie or pudding; tea,
coffee, or milk.
SPECIALS, as served
Soup . o with meat order .05
Roast or Fricassee of chicken .25
Roast Prime Ribs of Beef .25
Roast Leg of Veal with Dressing .25
Pork Sausage with Sweet Potatoes .25
Fork Chops Breaded. Extra Special .25
Small Steak with Onions. Ex. Spec'l .25
Bread and Ma-hed Potatoes included
with above meat orders.
Side Orders Extra
Potatoes mashed .05 Stewed tomatoes .05
Potatoes boiled .05 Stewed corn .05
Potatoes fried o5 Stewed peas .05
Potatoes germau fried .05

i

First Showing
of
Spring Clothes

MARQUARDT a n d
PERFECTION a r e
synonimous thoughts
in the minds of those
who plan to purchase
the foxiest in spring
clothes.

MARQUARDT
CAMPUS TAILOR
516 E. WILLIAM ST.

0

Elame made pies p
tard .05, with creaw
Coffee .05 Tea
Milk per bottle .05
TATE
p GREET
Open All Night

er cut .05
mi 10

Rice cus-

a .05 Chocolate .05
Cocoa .10
LUNCH
J. A. QUACKENBUSH, Mgr.

Professor Karpinski Gives Exhibition
Prof. L. C. Karpinski of the mathe-
matics department will give "a simul-
taneous exhibition of chess playing
before the Chess and Checker club at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 173 na-
tural sciencetbuilding. The doors will
be opened to all students at 6:30
o' lock.

New York, Mar. 9.-The Standard Oil
Co. Is opening up its fields in Turkey
and the Asiatic countries to single
American students between the ages
of 21 and 28. At first the work will
consist of clerical and office duties, but
as soon as the employees prove them-
selves capable they will take charge
of the organization and development
of new agencies.
Business experience is unnecessary.
Knowledge of a foreign language,
while desirable, is not essential, but
anyone who accepts a position must
learn the native tongue of the land in
which he will live. Opportunity for
advance is good, especially for engi-
neering students or those who have
had commercial and accounting
courses.
All applicants who, after a personal
interview with the officers of the con-
cern, are accepted, must then spend
four months at a training school in
New York, where they are instructed
in the work of the Standard Oil com-
pany by its various directors and
managers.
A salary of $17.50 per week is paid
while in training, and the field posi-
tions yield $2,000 per year. Steady
work is guaranteed for at least three
years, and good service will lengthen
this indefinitely.
Get your shoes fixed at Paul's Place,
611 E. William St. 5tf
Seats for Goethal's lecture on sale
at 10 A. M. today at Wahr's.

versity for appropriation for new and
better facilities and equipment, a
number of the University, bulletin has
been especially prepared for distribu-
tion among the members of the present
state legislatre.
The Regents of the University ask
appropriations for the following pur-
poses:
1. For the building and equipping
of a model high school for the prac-
tical training of high school teachers
in the department of education.
2. For the construction and equip-
ping of new hospital buildings.
3. For the construction of an addi-
tion to the engineering building to
provide adequate accommodations for
the teaching of automobile engineer-
ing, highway engineering, surveying,
and architecture.
Regents Prepare Statistics
Before giving the reasons for their
requests, the Regents have prepared
a table showing amounts of money ex-
pended by various states on their uni-
versities. The table shows that for
the past year the University of Michi-
gan cost the state $163 per student.
This is the lowest amount spent by
ay state. Illinois spends $406 per
student on its university. In this con-
nection the Regents point out that it
has been largely through bequests
made by alumni and friends of the
University that Michigan has been re-
lieved from having to depend more on
the state legislature for support.
In regard to the model high school
requested, the Regents state: "Such a
school must be provided if the de-
partment of education is to meet the
demands of its students and of school
authorities of the state." The Regents
ask $300,000 for the building and
equipping of the school, $25,000 for the
purchase of a suitable site for the
school, and $25,000 yearly for a period
of five years for its maintenance.
Want New Hospital Buildings
For the construction and equipping
of new hospital buildings at the Uni-
versity the Regents ask for $175,000
yearly for a period of six years. In
making this request the Regents point
out that the University hospital is
used quite as much for the relief ofi
the people of the state as for instruct-I
ive purposes. A map is included ini
the bulletin, showing that in 1916 theE
University hospital housed 15,443 pa-]
tients, who came from every county
in the state.l
The Regents finally ask an appro-l
priation of $250,000 for an addition or
additions to the engineering building.
In pointing out the need for an ade-]
quate automobile laboratory, it isl
stated that the present equipment isE
unsatisfactory, and the models ob-
tained from various automobile fac-1
tories cannot be used to advantage be-t
cause of overcrowded conditions in
laboratories not originally designedt
for automobile engineering. This pre-E
vents experimental work of a highi
order from being done.
Plan for Surveying Department
In asking for accommodations for
the surveying department, the Regentsi
state: "The engineering building was
planned to accommodate about 800
students. Before it was completed the

For fine Watch Repairing, J. L.
Chapman, Jeweler, 113 S. Main St.
I can duplicate any lens. J. L.
Chapman, Optrometrist and Jeweler,

Also a big line of the
New Spring Hats,
Caps, and Furnish-
ings.

We are showing the
nobbiest line of
SPRING SUITS

ff

and

TOP COATS

in the city,

TOM CORBETT
116 E. Liberty St.

Seats for Goethars lecture
at 10 A. f. today at Walir's.

on saleI

" "Fiue Young 'Ien's Shop"
ing and Architecture had increased to
more than 1,200. The present attend-
ance is more than 1,600. In order to
provide additional space for the work
of the college, in 1908 the department'
of surveying gave up its .rooms in the
engineering building and moved into
an old frame building erected in 1875
for hospital purposes. The Regents
point out that the fire risk is great in
this building, thus placing the con-
tents in danger of loss, and that its
facilities are entirely inadequate for
teaching purposes.
An addition to the engineering build-
ing is also requested for the accom-
modation of the courses in architec-
ture. This need is caused by increas-
ed attendance in the architectural col-
lege.
PEARY DEMANDS PREPAREDNESS
IN PLANES BY UNITED STATES
New Haven, Conn., March 9.-
Prompt aerial preparedness is the
plan advocated by Rear Admiral Rob-
ert E. Peary as the best means of
furnishing adequate defense for the
United States in case of attack. He
avers that it is too late to make any
appreciable additions to our navy, and
that we must resort to a quicker and
equally efficient means, the aerial
patrol.
This means of defense may be made
so effective as to become a complete
defense for our coast, and permit the
use of battleships and cruisers for a
distant offensive, he states.
Seats for Goetzal's lecture on sale

Leave Copy Leave Copy
at at
quarry's and LStudents'
The Delta Supply Store
A D VE R TI S ING

LOST
LOST -- A dark blue petticoat on
Thursday evening. Please return to
the Daily office. 10
LOST- Black seal muff. Return to
1204 Hill. Reward. Phone 390. 10
FOR SALE
FOR SALE-L. C. Smith Bros. Type-
writer. All latest improvements.
Reasonable terms. 121 Glen Ave.
693-J. 10-11

WANTED
WANTED-Lady for educational work
in Flint this summer. $240. Phone
359-M. 10-11-13-14
W ANTED-A second maid. Alpha Phi
House. Phone 368. 9-10-11
WANTED-Three waitresses. Phone
2374 or call 427 Maynard St. 9-10-11
ISCELLANEOUS
PRIVATE BOARD $54weekly. Inquire
at 410 Church St. Phone 450-R.
1-10 incl.

,..

Our Great Co-operative Sale of
Pianos and Player Pianos
Will save you Money
Beautiful New Grand Pianos
$460.00 Time Payment

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.

Phone 1707

E

attendance in the College of Engineer- at 10 A. M. today at Wahr's.

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