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March 08, 1917 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-08

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; PROBABLY
WARER

g4 ir rn

Dialig

UNITED PRESS

DA AN) NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

VOL. XXVII. No. 109. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 8, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENT

MILITARY TRAIING
ITEREST GROWS,
Record Attendance of Year Appeared
at Waterman Gymnasium
Last Night
"TWO WAR STRENGTH CORPS
FOR MICIJIGAN," NEW SLOGAN
Men Listen to Lectures by Captain
Lowry and 'Lieut. Schermer
After Drill
By L. S. T.
Active interest in military training
is steadily increasing in Michigan. The
largest attendance of the year, 125
men, was recorded at Waterman gym-
nasium last night for the voluntary
drill.
The men were divided into two com-
panies. From now on the slogan will
be, "Two war strength companies for
Michigan." There is every indication
that this number will be out for work
by the time warm weather arrives and
the men start work on Ferry field.
The rifles were not available for use
last night. The racks upon which
they will be permanently hung are not
yet ready. As soon as they are com-
plete the rifles will be brought from
the engineering college and kept in
the gymnasium, for the use of the
drillers.
The men were first split up into
platoons. Each division drilled as
a company. The 25 "rookies" who ap-
peared for the first time were scat-
tered about among the experienced
men. In a short time they succeeded
In acquiring the ability to follow com-
pany movements without trouble. Two
drills at most put the necessary finish
on new men to make them easy to
handle.
The drill was continued until 8:30
o'clock. Following this the men
marched down stairs to the handball
room on the east side of the building.
Seated on the floor in a semicircle
around the group of officers the stu-
dent-soldiers listened to a talk on the
subject of "Entrenchments" by Captain
J. D. Lowry and to one on "Outposts"
by Lieutenant Nathan H. Schermer.
Captain Lowry discussed the gen-
eral purpose of entrenchments, their
various classes and forms and the con-
siderations which govern choice of a
location. He emphasized the im-
portance of locating trenches to facili-
tate handling reinforcements and .pre-
vent undue exposure to enemy fire.
Lieutenant Schermer developed the
importance of efficient outposts. These
include sentinels, patrols, and scouts.
One of the most vital features of this
department of military duty is that of
securing information. How this is
done in practice and other phases of
the activity of those keeping guard
on the outskirts of a territory were
discussed.
The officers in charge of the drill
were enthusiastic at the generous re-
sponse for last night's drill. Arrange-
ments for two nights each week will
be made as soon as the number be-
comes unwieldy. The program for
next Wednesday's drill will be an-
nounced as soon as possible. The of-
ficers aim to spend a part of each drill
in discussing the many features of
military science.
A number of interesting subjects are
being prepared for discussion by the
officers. At least two will speak at
each meeting.
Villistas and Carrauzistas in Battle

El Paso, Texas. March 7.-Fighting
between a band of Villistas under Jose
Inez Sallazar aad government forces
under General Jose Murguia, has been
in progress in the Casas Grandes since
yesterday. A train carrying rein-
forcements to government troops from
Juarez was fired upon today by Villist-
as at Barreal, 60 miles south of the
border.

oat Clut Pldn
Promises Success

Students Willing to be Officers
Have Qualifications Con-
sidered

WillI

Numerous letters telling the writers'
experience in canoeing, yachting, and
water sports were received by the
Michigan Boat club yesterday. The1
tenor of the letters presages the suc-
cess of the plan whereby students in-
terested in acquatic sports, and will-
ing to serve as officers in the club,
have been asked to communicate with
Robert Collins, '17E, 910 Cornwell
Place,stating their qualifications.
A meeting of all students interested
in canoeing will soon be held to dis-
cuss plans for safe-guarding the Hur-
on, this season's activities, and the
problem of caring for privatelys
owned canoes.
GOVERNMENT FORCE
GETS CUBAN REBEL'
Gomez Captured, After Search, by Gen.-
Collazo, in Surprise;
Attack
Havana, Cuba, March 7.-General
Gomez, leader of the revolt against
President Menocal, and his entire staff
werescaptured today by government
troops.
General Collazo, commanding the
forces which have been searching for
Gomez, reported this afternoon that he
surprised the revolutionists encamped
near Placetas. Collazo's troops sur-
rounded the rebels, he said, and at-
tacked them.
Gomez and his entire staff were cap-
tured in the running battle which fol
lowed. Smell bodies of men broke
away from the Gomez band as the at-
tack revealed overwhelming numbers
against them, and escaped. Collazo
reported he was remaining at Placetas
to pursue and round up the remnants
of the band.
Speedy execution of Gomez was pre-
dicted this afternoon, as the news of
the capture spread in Havana. Wildly
demonstrative Latins collected about
the president's palace shouting with
wild enthusiasm.
SEE REVOLUTIONARY
MOVEMENT IN PERU
Prospects of Serious Uprising Follow
Assassination of Lower House
Member
Lima, Peru, March 7.-The palace
is under heavy guard and strong cen-
sorship is in effect as the result of a
revolutionary movement. All demon-
strations are being stopped by the
troops. A serious uprising followed
the assassination of Rafael Grau, mem
ber of the lower house of parliament,
and the situation is critical.-There
has been wide unrest in Peru since
the death in October of the former
President Billinghurst. While censor-
ship prevented further details being
transmitted by the United Press cor-
respondent, it appears likely that the
present uprising is part of an effort
by the Billinghurst party to overthrow
the government of President Pardo.
PRESIDENT WILSON C PINED
TO ROOM WITH SEVERE COLD
Washington, March 7. - President
Wilson is confined to his room with a
cold. It has been troubling him for
some time. On Monday it was aggrav-
ated by exposure to the wind and
dampness, when he was compelled re-
peatedly to lift his hat in response to
cheers when he saluted each American
flag carried past him at the reviewing
stand. After his conference today the

president went immediately to his
room, and was ordered to remain there
by Doctor Grayson.

DROP WILFUL SENATORS
FROM STEERING BODY
Filibusterers Are Rebuked by Action
of Republican Private
Caucus
Washington, March 7.-The first of-
ficial rebuke by the senate to the wil-
full 12 senators who blocked Presi-
dent Wilson's plan for placing the
United States under an armed neu-
trality was seen today when the Re-
publicans in private caucus dropped
from their steering committee Sen-
ators Cumminssand Gronna, two of
the obstructionists.
The name of Senator Jones of Wash-
ington, member of the committee dur-
ing the last congress, who fully dis-
cussed the armed neutrality bill, con-
suming several hours of the final day
of the session, and who signed the
round-robin under a misapprehension,
was also conspicuously missing from
the committee.
The action was taken to indicate
senate Republicans wished it under-
stood that they repudiated all respon-
sibility for what they called the
"most reprehensible filibuster in the
history of the senate."
The Republican caucus ratified the
cloture rule amendment by a vote of
30 to 2, shortly after 5 o'clock. Sen-
ators Sherman of Illinois and France
of Maryland voted against it. The
amendment will be presented tomor-
row in the senate and efforts made to
rush it through at once.
BRITISH COLONIES
TO JUDGE IRELAND
Premier Asquith Proposes Solution to
Home Rule Question Before
House of Commons
London, March 7.-Former Premier
Asquith, speaking in the house of com-
mons this afternoon, proposed that
colonial statesmen take up and adjust
the Irish question, subject to approv'li
by parliament. Nationalists forced a
postponement of decision until tomor-
row.
T. P. O'Connor precipitated the de-
bate on the Irish question, moving to
confer free institutions on Ireland.
O'Connor bitterly recounted Ireland's
grievances, particularly dwelling upon
the treatment of the participants in
the recent rebellion which, he said,
"transformed a friendly people into
one filled with bitter hatred of the
country." He advocated immediate
home rule for the safety of Ireland,
England, the empire, and for the al-
lies.
O'Connor's motion was designed to
enlist the whole house in a general
effort to settle the much debated Irish
question. The nationalists withdrew
from the house immediately to meet
elsewhere and determine their attitude
regarding the government's proposals.
Hear from White Star Liner Baltic
New York, March 7.-The White Star
liner Baltic, about which there has
been concern because she apparently
was overdue, has been reported at
Ambrose light, and was expected to
dock tonight, line officials announced
this afternoon. The Adriatic is expect-
ed here Friday with 37 first class pass-
engerg, 25 second class, and 87 steer-
age.

Weird Story of Poisoning Comes
to Light in London Conspiracy
London, March 7.-As wierd a story of plotting and poisons as
ever was attributed to the Medici came to a close in the old Bailey
prison this afternoon when the crown, through Attorney-General Sir
F. E. Smith closed its case against the quartette accused of conspir-
ing to kill Premier Loyd-George and Minister Arthur Henderson.
Mrs. Alice Wheeldon, the .oldest of the conspirators, mother of
Miss Hetty Wheeldon and of Mrs. Alfred Mason, was the first witness
for the defense. She swore that Inspector Gordon of Scotland Yard
approached her as a conscientious objector to military service, con-
cealing his true character as a secret service agent, and sought to
obtain from her poison with which to kill certain dogs guarding cer-
tain friends of his, other conscientious objectors, who were imprisoned
in concentration camps, that they might escape.
The crown called two expert toxicologists and pathologists, both
of whom delivered a bewildering analaysis of the effects of various
poisons found by Inspector Herbert Booth of Scotland Yard in the
possession of the accused.

MORGAN RETURNS AFTER
SELECTION OF COSTUMES,

BIGGEST VARSITY BAND
,TO APPEAR IN BOUNCEI

DIRECTOR COMMENDS WORK
CAST AND CHORUS IN
HIS ABSENCE

OF

PROCEEDS
TO

WAR TO PUT STOP
TO FILIBUSTERING
BEGINS IN SENATE
WALSH OF MONTANA EXPLAINS
DANGER OF UNLIMITED
DEBATE POWER
SUGGESTED CLOTURE
MEASURE STRINGENT
Would Limit Discussion to One Hour
and Provide Against All
Substitute Bills
Washington, March 7.-The fight 'to
end filibustering was opened in the
senate this afternoon by Senator.*Walsh
of Montana, who declared:
"Traitors might find their way into
the halls of congress, and by filibust-
ering hold the senate -at bay while a
foreign foe thundered at our gates. It
is not inconceivable that filibusterers
might be actuated by traitorous senti-
ments.
Benedict Arnold
"The revolution had its Benedict
Arnold. Ten members of the senate
were expelled for treason in 1861. A
vice-president was indicted for treason
at one time in our history. A member
of this senate was once expelled for
perfidious negotiations with enemies
of this country. Can the senate make
a rule under which it might not be
held at bay?"
Walsh's speech was very short, and
the senate adjourned until tomorrow,
shortly after he concluded.
The cloture rule agreed upon by the
conferees is 9 double-barreled pre-
ventative against filibustering. In ad-
ditidn to limiting debate to one hour
for each senator, it provides that no
amendment or substitute bills are to
be offered after an agreement to limit
the debate has been reached. A two-
thirds vote is required to limit debate.
Democratic Committee
The new Democratic steering com-
mittee was announced as follows:
Martin, Williams, James, Reed, Sim-
mons, Smith, Walsh, Thomas, Cham-
berlain, Owen, and Robinson. Senator
Hitchcock was named vice-chairman
of the Democratic caucus. As such he
becomes an ex-officio member of the
steering committee.
RUTHLESS SUB WAR SINKS 26
SHIPS DURING WEEK, REPORT

OF ENTERTAINMENT
APPAREL NEW
ME1MBERS

"The costumes are wonderful, the
best I ever have seen for a college
production," said Director Morgan of
"Fools' Paradise," who arrived in Ann
Arbor yesterday from Philadelphia
where he has been for the past week
personally supervising the selection of
the costumes. "This is the first time
the Van Horne & Son company has
had our contract and they are mak-
ing an especial effort to please us,"
he continued. "The costumes will be
aplkted by March 13, and will be
shipped immediately so that they will
be here in time to allow us four or
five dress rehearsals.
"I was in Chicago yesterday inspect-
ing the scenery. It is nearly com-
pleted now and is being painted. I ex-
pect it to be here within a week.
"The work of the chorus and cast
during my absence is particularly
commendable. The boys have worked
faithfully and I am highly pleased.
At present the work is a week in ad-
vance of last year at this time and
things are going exceptionally well."
The cast will rehearse at 4 o'clock
this afternoon and the chorus will hold
its next meeting at 7 o'clock tonight,
both rehearsals to be held at Lane
hall. The chorus men are requested
to bring dancing shoes with them to
their rehearsal as part of the time to-
day will be devoted to a special dance
drill.
PROF. J. B. ROBINSON TALKS
ON "NO WAR FOR AMERICA"
"No War for America" was the sub-
ject of the lecture given last night at
Newberry hall by Prof. John Beverly
Robinson of Washington university.
Professor Robinson's remarks were
especially interesting in view of the
present agitation for preparedness.
"War," said the speaker, "has nothing
to do with the case to be decided. It
simply settles which nation is the
stronger, and not which is in the right.
And yet we cannot overcome and abol-
ish war until society is completely re-
organized on a new and non-military
basis."

At the annual Band Bounce next
Friday night in Hill auditorium, the
Varsity band will appear with the
largest number of members ever to-
gether at one time in a campus con-
cert. The ranks of musical men have
been greatly augmente4 during the
last few months, and one of the chief
reasons for holding the concert is to
apparel and equip this additional
number.
An original march, composed by
Wilfred Wilson, director of the band,
and entitled "U. of M. Band March,"
will feature the orchestral part of the
program,, and vaudeville sketches,
dances, and monologue acts will com-
pose the remainder of the program.
One of the feature acts will be the pre-
sentation 'of a Pierrot and -Columbine
act by Helen McAndrew, '19, and Ge-
nevieve O'Leary, '17. Louis Emerman,
'18L, and Seymour Simons, '17E, will
present an original act in song and
monologue.
For musical numbers, the Wailani
string quartet will present a program
of Hawaiian melodies, while "Hep"
Ingham's Jazz orchestra will render
ragtime.
Morrison Wood, '17, and Eva Bowen,
'18, will appear in a novelty vaudeville
act in monologue, and James H. Ste-
phens will present a mandolin har-
mony act.
Tickets may be secured from student
committeemen and from Sheehan's
book store, Slater's, Wahr's, Grin-
nell's, and Huston's.
_____I

THEN IT HAPPENED !
Engineers Seek Light Button, Then
Light Dawns
Yesterday afternoon the arrival of
the hydraulic squad in the mechanical
laboratory found the place in dark-
ness. Immediately the members pro-
ceeded to search for light switches and
in so doing turned on the University
fire alarm. The engineer and his
assistant rushed into the room prepar-
ed to start the big electric 'pumps.
Thereupon the students explained their
mistake with the suggestion that that
particular switch be marked "fire
alarm."
Warrant is Out for International Spy
Washington, ,March 7.- A warrant
charging Arngaard Graves, self-styled
Internationalist spy, with trying to ex-
tort $3,000 from Countess von Bern-
storff, wife of the former Berman Am-
bassador, was filed in the district
supreme court today.

London, Mar. 7.-Twenty-six merch-
ant vessels have been sunk by mines
or submarines during the past week,
the official weekly announcement of
sinkings made by the admiralty said
this afternoon. The report was as
follows:
Merchant vessels over 16,000 tons
sunk, 14; vessels under 16,000 tons, 9;
flshing vessels sunk, 3; unsuccessfully
attacked by submarines, 12. During
the week 2,528 ships arrived in Brit-
ish ports and sailings numbered
2,477.
Classical Club to Give "Ipliigenia?'
Euripides' "Iphigenia in Tauris,"
will be presented by the Classical club
on March 29 in Hill auditorium. Those
taking part in the production are pay-
ing particular attentidn to the use of
the original Greek, while typical Creec-
ian costumes will be used.
Daily Errs in Previous Announcement
It was erroneously announced in a
previous issue of The Daily that Prof.
Beverly Robinson of the architectural
department would deliver a lecture on
"No War for America" at Newberry
hall last night.
Gen. Scott Reappointed Chief-of-Staff
Washington, March 7. - President
Wilson today reappointed General
Hugh L. Scott chief-of-the-staff of the
army.

d

VESPERS

5 o'clock to-day
Prof. Francis

Newberry Hall
W. Kelsey

I

r

i
.

I
Vv . _ .-

Corneli-

chigan

TRACK MEET
MARCH 17th 7:30 P.M.

11

Signed coupon number 14 received up to 6 P. M. March 12 to be exchanged for reserved seat tickets which will be mailed "not
later than March 16th. Applications will be filled in the order in which they are received. Gymnasium attendances are still
limited. If there are no tickets remaining on receipt of your application, your coupon will be returned.

ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

11 .

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