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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1916 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L \.LL 11 1 11 A--% 1 J a 1
WAMMMMMMM

10Ii

The most enviable
reward of those who

U

try to do their best is
to excite the sym-
pathy of intelligent
men. So the makers of
Smart othes

1 .-
fy2 /
ft' i
I

Calkins Drug Co.

Two Stores

324 So. State and 1123 So. University Ave.
Dental Medicines for Senior Dental Students.

Everything is right or we make it right.

--I

reap their reward in
the knowledge of the

I

)

4

ch
pr
tbi

.ass of men who ap- V
reciate and wear
eir product.V
. ' ts {
enwhmidt, Apfel & Co.
209 S. JMain St.
Teen -RT-, { o. t

WAR MOVIES WILL
BE SHOWNBY1 A.A.CI
Dr. G. B. Hayes, '89D, Urges Doctors
and Dentists to Enlist in
Hospital Work
K WHITE, EX '17 LECTURES
With prospects for an early exhibi-
tion of the motion pictures of the war

Sophs Scare Not
This Freshman
"Look out! Sophs! Beat it! Beat
it!"
With the hiss of'bursting shrapnel,
and the roar of the French "75's"
still ringing in his ears, one member
of the class of 1920 turned his head
very gravely, and curiously inquired

COPYRIGHT, 1916,
.- AALER, BROS. c o

Do Thi
"Provide
yours elf ,w
a smile an
air of pros
ity. Wea
your best
iness suit a
a cheerful
necktie.-I
you have i
best suit--
one. We h
to appear I
sperous, if
are to be p:
sperous."

Lind

STUDENTS--
IT WILL PAY YOU
to get your laboratory supplies for Bacteriology,
Histology, Pathology, Biology etc., at
The Eberbach & Son Co.
200-204 E. Liberty St.

Dry Goods, Furniture, and
Women's Fashions

s

Stop looking around aimlessly
for that favorite style of cloth
and tailoring.

MARQDARDT
CAMPUS TAILOR
516 E. Williams St.

taken along. different fighting fronts,
by representatives of the American
Ambulance Corps, student interest is
again resumed in the efforts of Mich-
igan men and women, who are over
in the hospitals and trenches in the
service of the foreign Red Cross Corps.
Among those most prominent in
the work of the ambulance corps, are
Louis Hall, Jr., who is doing ambul-
ance work between the trenches and
the field hospitals, and his mother,
Mrs. Louis Hall, wife of Dr. Louis
Hall of this city. Mrs. Hall has been
acting in the capacity of a directing
nurse in the American hospital in
Paris. The infinity of the work is
bewildering, she says, but the whole
gigantic task is carried on with the
system of perfect precision. Every
candidate for service is immediately
dispatched to his particular district,
and as all Paris has been transform-
ed into a huge hospital, as soon as
the application of a nurse is received,
she is at once assigned to one of the
field hospitals in the department of
the Seine, or is sent to a field hospital
behind the second line of trenches.
A very interesting survey of the
general conditions abroad is to be
found in a letter of recent date from
Dr. G. B. Hayes, '89D, who is operat-
ing in the military hospital of Paris.
Dr. Hayes says that never was there
greater chance for young American
surgeons and dentists, to achieve dis-
tinction, and sends an urgent plea to
all Michigan graduates to consider the
vast opportunity for experience, and
humane service. He says that there
is an especially promising .field in op-
erations on the head, and fractured
jaws. All Paris is ringing with the
praise of the Americana, and he be-
lieves that if young doctors, prefer-
ably with a year or so experience,
would enter the work, they would be
amply rewarded.
The pictures, which were taken un-
der the auspices of the American Am-
bulance Field Service, will be exhibit-
ed under the supervision of Kenneth
White, ex-'17, who has been driving an
ambulance along the French lines for
the past year. Mr. White has had
some extraordinary experiences while
working around the trenches, and his'
lecture should prove a most interest-
ing view of the conditions as seen by;
one who has had direct experiencet
on the European battle fields.
The pictures will be exhibited ini
Detroit, on October 13, and are ex-1
pected in Ann Arbor about the middle
of this month,

the meaning of the warning caution,
bellowed to his classmates by one of
the freshmen leaders. And even then
he couldn't understand when he look-
ed into the shadows and saw a half
dozen sophomores sulking behind a
tree while the multitude of his class-
mates dashed wildly in every direction
into the night.
Randolph Rogers, '20, is probably
the only man in the University of
Michigan who has seen actual fight-
ing along the great western war front,
and who has been in the ambulance
service, carried on under the fire of
the German artillery. Rogers, who is
18 years old, left Grand Rapids early
last March, for ambulance work along
the French lines. He arrived back in
New York last week, having been in
the war district the entire time in the
service of the American Ambulance
Corps.
During this time he saw the heavi-
est fighting of the war at Verdun, and
was in the field hospitals behind the
second line of defense. On one occa-
sion during a great artillery siege,
Rogers worked continuously for forty
two hours, bringing on a case of ex-
haustion and trench fever, which
rapidly developed into typhoid fever.
He was first taken to one of the field
hospitals, but was later transferred
to the military hospital of Paris, where
he was confined to a cot for over six
weeks.
He arrived back in New York Sep-
tember 28th, and entered the Univer-
sity on the first day of the team.

h

wmmmm-mmmmm
MMmMwmwMwwMM

EVERYONE

11

should know how to oper-
ate a typewriter and be able to write short-
hand. You a behind the times if you can't.
Lawyers
You will find shorthand and typewriting a
great help in your profession. Brief your cases
on the tvpewriter and they will be brief.
Teachers
There is no more fascinating study than Gregg
Shorthand or Bookkeeping. Why not add them
to the subjects you can teach? It will greatly
increase your opportunities.
Hamilton Business College
State and William Sts.

REULE,
CONLIN,
FIEGEL
COMPAN
200-202 MAIN

. ,

11

Come

OFFICIAL Laboratory
Coats, Shop Coats,
and Waiters' Coats and
Aprons of highest qual-
ity materials and work-
manship, are now ready
at lowest prices.

I

YOU WANT AN INDIVIDUAL SUIT
I MAKE AN INDIVIDUAL SUIT
To learn Inewriting e
requires close applicatiot
A. tyewriter and free
instruotion bok from
..D.,orrill. 322 S. State,

(Men's Shop-MainmFloor)

Outlook Fine For
Debating Team
With four Varsity debaters back this
year, the outlook is promising for a
very successful season. Not only will
students be given free admission to
the contests but as a result of an
action taken by the oratorical board
late last spring, the general public will
also be permitted to attend.
Two intercollegiate debates are
scheduled to take place in Ann Arbor.

r

wommoommom"M
mmmmmmmmmmww

i

will do the rest.

-..._o...... .

Chat's New
Lunch Roorn
across the street from former location
Rapid service in morning before classes
Phone for a night order delivered to your room

L.R. FLOOK ADVISES AUTOISTS
IN REGARD TO PARKING OF CARS
By the advice of L. R. Flook, acting
superintendent of buildings and
grounds, automobiles using campus
driveways are requested to use every
precaution to prevent accidents, espe-
cially at the diagonal walk and in
crossing street car tracks and traffic
at North University avenue. Reckless
drivers will be prosecuted. In all
cases it must be born in mind that
pedestrains have the first right.
Parking will be limited to the open
space at University hall, the south
loop of the Mall driveway, the open
place near the old boiler house and
the space at the south side of theen-
gineering shops. Parking along nar-
row drives must be discontinued.,
Our alarm clocks are good clocks.
Chapman, Jeweler, 113 South Main
street. tues-eod
Call 600 for expert typewriting.
oct3 to 29

Riding on Campus Walks Forbidden
"The riding of bicycles on any
campus sidewalk or on any portion of
the campus other than regularly pro-
vided roadways for vehicles is forbid-
den. Violators of this rule will be
prosecuted.
"By order of the Regents of the Uni-
versity of Michigan."
The above notice has been posted
throughout the campus for about two
months. During this time above two
dozen offenders have been warned
that their second offense will be prose-
cuted. During the first week of school
many students have been similarly
warned, and invariably pleaded ignor-
ance of this rule.
See Schaeberle & Son, 110 South1
Main street, for Ukeleles, Martin Gui-
tars, Mandolins and all Musical Instru-
ments. oct3tf

UNIVERSITY CLUB OF DETROIT
PLANS BIG YEAR FOR ALUMNI
"A better and a stronger Michigan
than we have ever had in the past" is
the aim of the University of Michigan
club of Detroit, according to the an-
nouncements which it has just sent
out.

You can't break out of a Davis one-
piece athletic suit, 60c. Davis at 119
Main. oct5,7,10,14

Now that the football season is on
and the big games not far away, the
time of the year when the blood of
the alumni runs high, the club of-
fers a way by which that spirit if put
into concerted action will greatly aid
their Alma Mater.
The only qualification required to
become a member of the club is to be
a 'Michigan man and to send to the
club treasurer, Mr. Milo H. Crawford,
1604 Dime Bank building, the annual
dues of $2.00.

C
S
a
e'
r
h

this season, the first being with the
University of Chicago on January 19.
The question to be debated is: "Re-
solved; That the federal government
should levy a progressive inheritance
tax, granted that such tax would be
constitutional." On the same even-
ing a Michigan team will meet a team
representing Northwestern University
at Evanston where the same question
will be contested.
On March 30, Michigan faces a team
from the University of Illinois to de-
bate a question which will be an-
nounced about the early part of next
month. At the same time a debate will
take place with the University of Wis-
consin at Madison.
The band is to be present at both
Lebates and will render selections from
7:30 o'clock until 8:00 o'clock. Some
prominent man will be selected to pre-
side at each of the contests, and the
attendance is expected to be the larg-
est in the history of Michigan oratory.
The annual peace oratorical contest
will be conducted as usual, and it is
requested that all orations be in the
hands of Ray K. Immel not later than
November 25. Preliminary contests
will be held, while the date for the
Jniversity contest is ,set for Decem-
ber 15. The cup debate will take place
April 28.

WANTED

1116 S. UNIVERSITY

PHONE 699-

District Manager for Washtenaw County, with Detroit privi-
leges, for the New England Mutual Life Insurance Company of
Boston, the oldest Company in America and having a large and
influential business in Michigan. The rapid and steady growth of
life insurance promises very substantial progress to men of good
character, courage and industry. Applicant must be well and fav-
orably known. The right man will be financed as reasonably re-
quired. Address, giving full information,
UTTER & THOMSON State Agents
623 Penobscot Bldg.
Detroit, Michigan

-_.__
.-_.. ,_

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-Room for one in private
home. Good milk, pure water, and
best of food and cooking. Tele-
phone 1600-J.
FOR RENT - Light housekeeping
rooms at 209 14th St. Also single
rooms. Modern. Conveniences.
Light lunches served. oct10,11
FOR RENT-Furnished rooms. 1014
Cornwell place. Phone 2161-J.

LOST
LOST-$9 in small bills on Campus, in
Wahr's Book Store, or on South Un-
iversity Ave. Liberal reward if re-
turned. Call 418-M. oct10

r

Boat Pianos for Rent
Terms Keasonable
If you are thinking of purchasing, it will be to your advantage
to buy during our
Summer Resort Sale
NOW GOING ON

DUPLEX THEATER PLANNED
TO BACK PRESENT ORPHEUM
New Picture Show to Seat 700 People;
Houses to Have Same
Stage.
Excavations have been started for
the new Duplex moving picture the-
ater which will be owned and- man-
aged by Mr. J. F. Wuerth, present
owner of the Orpheum theater.
The new show house is to be built
on the lots in the rear of Mr. Wuerth's
clothing store, and will be so con-
structed that the present stage of the
Orpheum, after being enlarged, will
serve both picture houses. When com-
pleted the theater will seat 700 peo-
ple.
In addition to the theater, Mr.
Wuerth is building an arcade on the
north side of his store, opening on
Main street. "

The new picture show will introd
several new features into the mov
picture business of this town.
propriate scenic effects will be
stalled in both the Orpheum and
Duplex and a pipe organ and gra
piano will be used to furnish mm
for both houses. Rest rooms and
overflow balcony will be features
the new Duplex.
Exits from -the Orpheum and
Duplex will lead into a basement ca
Wilson Prepares Indianapolis Spec
Asbury Park, N. J., Oct. 9.-In t
midst of new international diploma
found time for preparing his forthcc
problems, President Wilson tod
ing Indianapolis speech designed,
managers say, to swing the Hoos
state from "doubtful" to "Democrati
The President plans to go the
Thursday, but will make no rear'pl
form talks.

LOST-Emerald ring, initial L. S.

o.

inside. Please return to this office
or call Ogden, 1569-M. Reward.
octlo,11
LOST-Black and white long haired
dog. Reward. Call Phi Delta Theta.
oct10

Grinnell Bros.

116 S. Main St.
PHONE 1707

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