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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I I VIIl.F-l.UI L/TAIL. I

' THE TREAT
TODAY
stie-Vaudeville
de-.Virginia P
evil Kate." Mut

* * * * * iiiir rni l
EHS * BGESLLGUE flS
( ACULTY MEN ENROLLED

1
l
t
i

earson in
t and Jeff

eum-Douglass Fairbanks
'he Half-Breed." Triangle
dy-Joseph Belmont in "A
abaret."
* * * * * * * * * *

*1
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* I
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*

AT THE MAJESTIC.
udeville is again on the boards
e Majestic theater.
e big act on the program is Imhof,
and Corenne. Roger Imhof, as
>elated peddler, seeks lodging in
fore the War Hotel." Hugh Conn
ars as Hank Louder, a porter,
is hard of hearing and ambitious{
e a fireman. Marcelle Corenne
a a dual role, appearing first as
andlady's daughter and finally as
ined nurse.
e Kaufman brothers both { have
al voices and a new line of com-
le. LaToy has four educated dogs
are not of the usual run, but
pose in reproductions of master-
s making entertainment for both
rtistically inclined and those who
comedy. The comedy pantomime
ry good.
cRae and Clegg have a bicycle
The man is a good comedian,
e the girl is an expert on the
al.
ibs and Alton are clever enter-
,rs. They sing, dance and play
violin and piano much to the sat-
tion of the audience. They are
young and have a neat way of
ducing their act.
hmen to Smoke Next Tuesday Eve.
ans are being made for a mam-
a freshman smoker to be held at
Union next Tuesday evening, Oc-
r 17.
ris srhoker is for the purpose of
ng the freshmen acquainted. A
ed entertainment will be provided.

Workers Will Strive to Get Full Re-
publican Registration
of Voters.
More than thirty thousand college
alumni are now enrolled in the Hughes
National College League which is rap-
idly organizing branches in hundreds
of cities and all the states of the
Union. Landon P. Marvin, an over-:
seer of Harvard University, and Sam-
uel J. Reid, Jr., secretary for the
Princeton club of New York, are in
charge of the work of organizing the'
branches.
Of the thirty thousand alumni now
enrolled seventeen members of the
league are residents of Ann Arbor.
Eight of the seventeen are members
of the faculty of the University. Lists
of the local members, classified ac-
cording to the work they have volun-
teered to perform, are promptly for-
warded to each new chairman. Men in
all the branches are volunteering to
speak, canvass among the voters, get
out a full Republican registration and
all the vote on election day, and carry
on other campaign activities.
"Our whole effort," says national
campaign manager George Brokaw
Compton, "has been to energize all
these college men, systematize their
efforts and make this fund, of energy
available for actual work with the
regular organizations in this cam-
paign. Under the leadership of our'
president, Senator Theodore E. Burton,
we have succeeded admirably and have
added thousands of men to our fight-
ing force who could not have been
reached in any other way."
According to a letter recently receiv-
ed from the Hughes National College
league the local members of the league
are: President Harry B. Hutchins,
Prof. H. H. Bartlett, Prof. W. H.
Hobbs, Prof. J. W. Bursley, Prof. F.
R. Finch, Prof. G. W. Patterson, Prof.
A. L. Cross, Mr. F. M. Chapin, Mr. L.

l
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I
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S
Y
1
1
1
c
j

A. Wikel, Prof. W. J. Hale, Mr. C. C.c
Wolcott, Mr. J. W. Langley, Mr. C. B. U
Lewis, Mr. J. C. Chalmers, Mr. J. B. SE
Comstock, Mr. Linton B. Dimond, and o f
Mr. W. H. Hanhart. C. . C. TOISH HEREd
EXTENSION DIVISION TO AID First Appearance of a Rival Cross-,
HIGH SCHOOLS IN ORATORY Country Squad on FerryF
Field.
The extension division of the Uni-
. - . For the first time In the history of
versity of Michigan, co-operating with Frcheanrthtimsthe hssory
the department of oratory, has de- Michigan athletics, the cross-countryI
vised a new phase of extension service squad of a rival school will appear onl
for high schools of the state in con- Ferry field. The athletic association
nection with their class work in pub- yesterday afternoon announced the
lic speaking. scheduling of a dual distance runi
Any Michigan high school will now with Syracuse University on Saturday,s
be furnished upon application by the October 28, the day of the Orange-1
superintendent, or other reliable per-
son, material onrcurrent topics suit- Wolverine gridiron tussle. This will>1
able for debating or public speaking. be the first dual meet ever indulged'
In case the material listed in the bib- by the Michigan hill-climbers and
liographies is not available in the 10- is being heralded as the fore-runner
cal libraries pamphlets and books in of a new era of prosperity for thist
package form will be loaned by the much-abused sport. The scheduling of
University library for a period of six the Orange men gives the Maize and
weeks. Blue squad a chance to appear twice
Formal statements of questions for in competition this fall, the team be-I
debates with briefs for affirmative and ing also entered in the I. C. A. A. A. A.r
meet at New Haven, Conn., November
negat ve arguments will be sent upn25. -In this meet the team will com-
request. This service will be free of .Intimetheea wllc -f
charge. pete with Cornell, Harvard, Maine,.
Princeton and other schools with big
IN NDERT OL BUSINESS reputatio in cross-country work. 1
STNE TR-O UIS TODAY The sport at Michigan is compara-
STAFF TRY-OUTS TODAY 1 tively a new one, but two Varsity
teams having preceded the present one.r
The Inlander is making an urgent The competition has hitherto been con-1
request for men to try-out for the posi- fined to the annual eastern classic, in7
tion of business manager. The men which the Wolverines finished last in
who were out for the managership are 1914 and tenth in 1915. The Uni-
unable to return this year. Juniors versity of Maine septet, which gained
and sophomores are especially re- first honors in the run last year, the
quested to apply, although there are squad .of Red flyers from the shores<
good opportunities for freshmen to of Lake Cayuga, who have won the
come out and get in line for future meet six times in the eight years of
Jobs. All those desiring to try out its existence, and the plucky Prince-
should see K. C. Kayes, the present ton bunch, third place winners in 1915,
business manager, at 4:00 o'clock this are the teams that Michigan must down
afternoon. to land among the leaders this fall.
The one thing that will militate
Anbassador Page Returns to London against the chance of a Maize and
London, Oct. 9.-Walter R. Page, Blue victory this fall is lack of ma-.
American ambassador to England, re- terial, but twenty men having re-
turned to London today after a visit ported to Coach Farrell for workouts
to the United States. Iso far. Two hundred and sixty-five

candidates presented themselves to
Coach Jack Moakley at Cornell for the
first call last week. The University
of Maine, a school with but 1,400 stu-
dents, had a turnout of 60 candidates.
The squad at present is composed of
the following men: Carroll, Meehan,
Bouma, Cook, Cantor, Strenfert,
Walker, Kuivinen, Maynard, Matthews,
Fuess, Sawyer, Denne, Fox, Murphy,
Harsha, Herlihy, Hayes, Sedwick, and
Langley.
U-Boat Scare Hits Stock Market
New York, Oct. 9.-The stock mar-
ket was demoralized at today's open-
ing, standard issues as well as war
stocks breaking, 5, 10, and even 12
points at the outset on enormous
liquidation. The break was attributed
to the German submarine activities and
their possible consequences.
FALL TENNIS TOURNEY BEGINS
(Continued from Page Three.)
pairings below, in order that the first
round may begin right away.
Mr. Rowe will be on hand at Ferry
field to see that entrants are given im-
mediate use of the courts. Two sets
out of three will decide all matches
until the semi-finals.
The pairings are as follows:
Palmer Sutton (1016) vs. S. Booth
(2467), M. B. Doty (1460) vs. J. P.
Hart (131), J. H. Mutchler (904J) vs.
Paul Steketee (319), Albert Ohlmacher
(1016) vs. W. G. Davidson, G. N. Earle'
(1552W) vs. Irving Beckwith (1600W),
J. L. Mooney (264J) vs. P. T. Smith
(799M), H. L. Popp (878J) vs. H. J.
Schlee. (2246J), Milton Goldberg
(1808W) vs. E. L. Moloney, G. H. Chid-
ester (385W) vs. Emil Safarick, C. E.
Heuen (188) vs. Bill Beatty (319), F.
L. Froemke (188) vs. Herbert Selby
(1234W), Lawrence Ecbert (1197M) vs.
Sam Cohen (1104), J. I. McClintock
(264J) vs. H. D. Bronson (385W), L.
D. Hiett (812W) vs. R. M. Hays (7993),
Ray Swanson (954M) vs. R. S. Breckey
(1504), V. H. Waite (1823W) vs. E. S.
Chipman (1608M), Howard Kelsey vs.
Walter Rogers (355), D. C. Mittlesdorf

(374) vs. Henry A. Lewis, Sam Kauf-
man (1104) vs. D. A. Diffenderfer
(475), H. R. Bell (1216W) vs. F. E.
McKee (1780).
S. Shartel (236) vs. B. C. Colcord
(1582J), H. J. Bair (1317J) vs. D. F.
Didier (799M), H. B. Lewis (1168) vs.
C. S. Cohn (557M), H. B. Adams
(799MO) vs. Hilton Nowlen (1582J),
Chester Parmerlee (1322R) vs. Ben-
jamin Rose (410), Geo. C. Codd (131)
vs. Ashley Hatch (410), C. A. Towler
(1119J) vs. Eugene Steketee (319), G.
K. Briggs (18) vs. Larry McArthur
(1949), L. G. Gamble (1896F2) vs.
Robert Kerr (1264R), Nicholas Bartz
(2283W) vs. H. E. Mitchell (264J),
Richard Goldsmith (110M) vs. Albert
Goorin, R. W. Jennings (1273M) vs.
A. K. Berkowitz (1408M), C. A. Bur-
ton (954M) vs. B. W. Donaldson (355),
N. F. Shambaugh (1848R) vs. G. B.
Riker (475), S. Pinel (188) vs. C. F.
Wells, L. E. Waterburg (33) vs. O. A.
Kaufman (2413R),
W. W. Dawley (1809W) vs. Wm.
Seff (1324J), J. W. Codd (131) vs. N. C.
Roegner (1808W), Ward Batty (2467)
vs. G. W. Hurlbut (1359M), R. S.
Cooper (1599M) vs. W. R. Borinstein
(1054M), C. H. Hsia (1150M) vs. T. R.
Harrison (2366J), R. T. McDonald
(799M) vs. Winfield Goong, W. H. Dor-
rance (2236M) vs. L. S. Hecht (2420J),
J. C. Post (938R) vs. Hayden Palmer
(131), Sanford Wilson (18) vs. H. P.
Simons (843J), H. R. Hansen (2467)
vs. H. Easley (350), C. C. Wolcott (144)
vs. S. J. Miller (1104), O. H. Morton
(2236M) vs. J. V. Tracy (71J).
C. V. Hicks (120) vs. L. G. Hulbert
(1551); A. K. Strouse vs. N. A. Hoe-
feld (1813M); L. J. Thorsch (1408J)
vs. H. J. Hamer (1466R); Earl Weiner
(1104) vs. L. A. Abel (954M); E. Petty-
John vs. F. E. Davis (1602W); C. H.
Adams (236) vs. S. H. Eaton (236).
To learn tpQw 't wel
requires close applioatiOt
A t.pewM3t-r adire
inst rct ion o from
will c o .tae rest p

MUSIC

1916

- 1917

.. . .

OCTOBER 12

JANUARY 26

LOUISE HOMER, Contralto
Metropolitan Opera Company

BOSTON SYMPHONY
ORCHE STRA
Dr. Karl Muck, Conductor

NOVEMBER 8

FRITZ KRESLER, Violinist
Renokvned Austrian Artist

PEBRUARY 28

DECEMBER 12

OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH
Pianist
Distinguished Russian
'Musician

HAROLD BAUER, Pianist
PABLO CASALS,
Violoncellist
A n Unsurpassable Combin-
ation

MADAME LOUISE HOMER

HAROLD BAUER

DR. ALBERT A. STANLEY, Director

Ann Arbor Concerts

To Be Given In

HILL

AUDITORIUM

ONE OF THE WORLDS FINEST MUSIC HALLS

Reserve Seat Ticket Sale

FRITZ KREISLER

Monday Oct. 9, 8:00 A. M. Block "A" -
Tuesday Oct. 109 8:00 A. M. Block "B" -
Wednesday Oct. 11, 8:00 A. M. Block "C" -
Wednesday Oct. 11, 1:00 P. M. Single Tickets

- $4.00
- 3.50
- 3.00
$1, $1.50, $2

OSSIP EABRILOWITSCH

COURSE TICKETS contain cover coupon good
for $3 when exchanged for May Festival course
tickets in the Spring.
AN ALL STAB SERIES BV MUS
C iANS Of WORLD FAME
See Special Choral Union Announcement

PABLO CAsALS

DR. KARL MUCK

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