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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 03, 1917 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATUJ

Y

ANNOUNCING OUR EXHIBIT
Spring and Summer Suitings
From American and Foreign Sources in Artistic and Striking Designs
YOUR INSPECTION INVITED

Oficial newspaper at the University of
1i'.,gan. Published every morning except
M.nday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
' ee-: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriplions: by carrier $2.50; by mail, $3.00.
Wat ad. stations: 6uarry's; Students' Sup-
1d Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
'hones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.

G. H. Wild Company

Leading Merchant Tailors

STATE STREET

11

Unsiversity
TEXT BOOKS
New end Seconxdh rnd
The Slater Book Shop

STOP AT
TUTTLE'S
338 S. STATE
for sodas and lunches
GEORGE BISCHOFF
FLORIST
hoice Cut Flowers and Plants
V Chapin St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
PHONE 809 M

Rowe City Laundry
406 Detroit St
Cash cards save you money
PHONE 457-M
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $ioo,ooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS

Wirt Cornwell
Geo. W. Patterson
S. W. Clarkson
Fred Schmid

Waldo M. Abbott
Harry M. Hawley
Harrison Soule
D. B. Sutton

E. D. Kinnie

TRY OUR

Fruit Rolls
Butter Creams

Mexican Fudge
Bitter Sweets

Communications not to exceed 300 words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily, at the discretion of the
Editor, if left at the office in the Ann Arbor
Press Bldg., or in the notice box in the west
corridor of the general library, where the
notices are collected at 7 3ayo'clock each
evening.
John C. B. Parker.........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh......Business Manager
Conrad N. Church .............News Editor
ILee E. Joslyn...........City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald...... .Sports Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Marian Wilson ... ...Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade.........Statistical Edit-n
J. E. Campbell....Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Eniery..Assistant Business Manager
Albert E. Horne. .Assistant Business Manager
loscoe R. Rau...Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter. ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
J. L. Stadeker E. L. Zeigler
C. M. Jickling H. M. Carey
B. A. Swaney L. W. Nieter
L. S. Thompson
Reporters
. C7. Garrison Jactmes schrmerhorn
C. S. Clark D. S. Rood
R. 1l..IFricken G. O. Brophy
B. I. Millar F. A. Taber
D. II. Cruttenden Mildred C. Mighell
IL, L. Wchnmey.er J. P. Hart
Anl~t. V, ,Qt,,7J.C. M artin
T. F. McAllistr Allan Shoenfield
C. C. Andrei, It. F. Mlclonald
C. ,.Golds;tein
Business Staff
Paul I. Cholette Harry R. Louis
1-larold Makinson Earl F. Ganschow
Walter R. Payne Jackson W. Smart
Harold R. Smith Seymour B. Wilson
Bernard Wohl
SATL L .AY, MAR- IC1 3, 1917.
Night Editor-Harry M. Carey
A BOOST FROM DETROIT ALUMNI
The plan of the Detroit alumni to
establish a loan association for Mich-
igan students should prove of great
benefit to the University. Although one
of the first objects of the plan will be
to send better athletes to Michigan, it
will in no way encourage a spirit of
professionalism, for it will demand
high character and scholarship qualifi-
cations as well as athletic abil,3ty. Mo l-
erate sums of money will be loaned to
boys on a business basis for use
throughout their college course, after
they have satisfied the trustees of the
fund in the requirements mentioned.
In assisting men of first rate caliber
to obtain an education, and to take
part in its athletic activities, the De-
troit alumni are doing Michigan a real
service. We hope that alumni organ-
izations in other cities which are look-
in for sml() %ay to materially benefit
the University will adopt a similar
plan.

These are only a few of the Candy Speciaities we
are offering. STRICTLY FRESH AND PURE.
The Fountain of Youth
State Street Cor. Liberty

. ..

Y
.v
I ''
i.
; ,
:.t5acĀ£ii , !" YFR15oxYr: Get.::

I

Students interested
in Spring or Sumrner
Vacation Work may
file their applications
with the "Y" Employ-
ment secretary now.
Office open from
3 to 6 p. m. daily.

- -

lldtd}Il~l l 1 1S il I 111117tlil illlll li li ti i llld iltd l ll I plIlf}Itlillilli}llllilll'-
Track adidare
w-
Will find the proper equipment-
EBEat B
WAw
VNIVESITYBOOKTORE

We Offer You
SECURITY- - SERVICE - -LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo ,ooo

Ann Arbor Savings Bank
( hicorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron

4

Branch Office--
707 North University Ave.
he Farmers & Mechanics Bank
Offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY ( - - EFFICIENCY
nventent and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
Pleased With Our Service. Two Offices
1-105 S. Main St. : 330 S. State St.
THE SUGAR BOWL1
109 S. Main St. I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Cars run on Eastern time, one hour faster
than local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:35 a.
in., 8:1o a. m. and hourly to 7:10 p. m., 9:10
P. Mn.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars-"-8:4& a. ti and
every two hours to 6:48 p. in.: to Lansing,
8:43 P. M.
Jackson Express Cars-(Local stops west of
Ann Arbor)-9:48 a. m. and every two hours
to 7:48 P, . .
Local Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m , 6:40 a
r.1 7:c5 o. m. aed every two hour' to 7:05 p
t., 8:05 p. m:, 9:05 p. i., 0:5 p. m. tc
Ypsilanti only, 9:20 a. in., 9:50 a.%m., z:05 P
m., 6:otp. in., 11:45 p. in., I::o a. m, x:2'
a, m. to Saline, change at YpsilarI~
Local Cars Westbound-6:o5 a. in., 7:5o a
m. e:2o p. rn.. 12:ao a. m.
Takes Pictures
Develops Films
flmakes Prints
and Enlarge-
ments,
713 E. UNiVE RS1ITY f
0tThe University of Chicago
II M in addition to resident
OM work, offers also instruc-
tion by correspondence.
STUDY Uformation address
L24th YearU.oC.(i.is kk i ton T,,
OUT-VOTED BY6A SMILE,

DIAGEE__BUT I0DI
WRITER OBJECTS WHEN DR. N. S.
HAR)IKAR SAYS PEOPLE BE-
CA)IE PAUPERS UNDER BRITISH
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I am hoping that you may find
space in your columns for a letter
dealing with a statement reported in
your issue of Ib. 28, as having been
made by Dr. N. S. Hardikar, in his
article about British India. The state-
ment follows:
"India's wealth always remained in
India through all these invasions. But,
under the British rule this state of
things changed, and the people became
paupers."
So loose a statement possibly needs
no controverting, but, as it has seemed
to me that many of your readers have
no very great knowledge of the true
state of affairs in British India, I
think it may not be amiss to mention
a few facts, which to a people noted
for their love of justice and fair play,
should speak for themselves.
The British, when they came to In-
dia, found a people governed by war-
ring native , rulers who ground down
the ryots or agricultural classes, and
levied huge tributes. The money was
in India, no doubt, but it was all in
the hands of a small class.
The British found the peaceful Hin-
dus persecuted by their Moslem neigh-
bors, and subjected to periodical mas-
sacres. The British found many bar-
barous religious customs in use, the
most celebrated being "Suttee," the
immolation of a widow on her hus-
band's death, and the Juggernaut car.
Immense tracts of land were unirri-
gated, .and therefore subject to period-
ical famines. A system of usury was
in full swing in the village commun-
ities by which thousands of , people
were ruined yearly.
Since British rule has been in full
power, these abuses have been met as
follows:
The ryots and artisan class gener-
ally no longer pay tribute to the native
rulers. The lower classes as a rule
pay no taxes of any kind and the taxes
in any case follow a regular scale ac-
cording to the payer's income. Re-
ligious persecutions and riots are no
longer allowed. At Hindu festivals

LANDERS
FOR
FLOWERS

PIONE 294

D
H'ro

213 E.I

Liberty St.

-A
TBLES and mosquitos
a lot alike. Neither
Ts 'round a place whar

f
mom

thar's plenty o' good ,fr
pipe smoke.
VELVET is a good pipe smoke

9 A

Member of Florists' Telegraph
Delivery Servi e
Flowers by Wire to All the World.

one 1tare
one stay

L

I

Leave your DULL Safety Razor
Blades to be SHARPENED with
William W. Behringer
11 NICKELS ARCADE

\Atl

...

the police, and if necessary, the mili-
tary are called out, to see that
the worshippers are not molested.
"Suttee" and the Juggernaut car have
been abolished. The land has been
thoroughly irrigated for the peasants,
famines being thereby very much di-
minished, and when the latter do oc-
cur, government aid is forthcoming.
The old system of usury is restricted
by law.
It would be possible to carry this
list much further and mention the

work done for the people as regards
higher education, hygiene and sanita-
tion and the betterment of the condi-
tion of women through the Zenana
work, but I think the facts I have
mentioned speak for themselves. They
also show why the great bulk of the
working classes in India are so ex-
tremely loyal to the British govern-
ment.
VERA STEWART BARBOUR.

Have you seen a robin yet?

SPECIAL SUNDAES
LIGHT LUNCHES

I Our candies are made in
our own sanitary shop.
Get a typewriter from
0. D. M O R R I L L
822 South Stets Street
He will furnish you an instruction
book free of charge. You will be a
typist before you know it.

P11ARITIC PRAISES
ARTICLE :DEALING
FERHENCE.
McAllister's article,

I-NLANDER
WITH CON-
"The Other.

I

W~tomen

Try-outs for the annual League play
given under under the auspices of
Masques will be held next Monday
from 2 to 4 o'clock, in Barbour gym-
nasium. Try-outs are open to all girls
on the campus except freshmen.
There will be a regular meeting of
the board of directors of the Women's
league at 9 o'clock this morning in
Barbour gymnasium.
The cast and choruses of Act 1 of
the Junior Girls' play will rehearse
at 9 o'clock this morning in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
xtension Lectures
"Health Progress" is the subject of
a lecture to be given by Dean Victor
C. Vaughan tonight in Grand Rapids.
Prof. J. S. Reeves will speak to-
morrow night in Plymouth, Mich., on
"The, Managerial Form of Govern-
ment."'
Prof. Robert M. Wenley will speak
tomorrow in the First Baptist church
of Lansing on "Changing America."
Prof. J. R. Allen will speak tomor-
row in the First Congregational
church of Detroit on "Turkish Life

Side, which appeared in the latest is-
sue of the Inlander shows distinctly
that all intelligent thought is not dead
at Michigan.
It is to be hoped that every student
riot only reads but fully digests this
article. Every detail of the confer-
ence question is so ably covered little
comment is necessary.
There are two points, however, that
I should like to emphasize, firstly in
pro-conference argumentation, base-
ball is quite notably absent. An
analysis of the schedules and records
of the past few years shows plainly
why this is so. Two years ago Coach
Lundgren claimed the championship of
the country in university baseball. If
Michigan had been in the conference
would a schedule of this scope have
been possible? Decidedly no!
Last spring there was the slump us-
ual after exceptional seasons and we
were notaso sucessfutl. Michian har,
the saine Comlp_ 1hi I ive schedult', irtlx
ally, and r ehe sante chance
for the championship as two years
ago. Is not this worth more to Mich-
igan than the _(re chance of leading
the conference?
Secondly, this University is popular-
ly supposed to have student govern-
ment to at least a small extent. This
being the case why are we not given
a voice in as important a question as
the conference? It is all too evident
that certain pro-conference authorities
are afraid of a repetition of the 1913
vote.
I also, with Mr. McAllister, could
have been out voted with a smile, but
who can say that the smile would
have been necessary?
M, WOODWARD, '17P.

If events continue as in the past we
may soon expect a notice that the
Union is repairing the temporary tem-
porary quarters that may replace the
temporary quarters that are replac-
ing the permanent quarters.
An Ann Arbor saloon keeper has
voiced his intention of going on a farm
in 1918. Someone asks whether he
will raise blind pigs.
Iow can a man who knows enough
to teach in a university believe that
his class room can be ventilated
through closed windows and doors?
3i)(JL1:.AkI- -:OtI 11lI CLUB TO
)ISCUSS CAMPAIGN )ETHODS
Local committees and all persons
interested in the work of the Dollar-a-
Month club will get together in Lane
hall today at 4 o'clock to discuss
methods of furthering their campaign
for the relief of Belgian children.
Mrs. William D. Henderson is chair-
man of the most important local com-
mittee. Under her charge the city will
be divided into a number of wards,
each ward being under a sub-chairman
who will be responsible for her ward.
On the coming Monday and Tuesday
a house-to-house canvass will be
made.
The sub-chairmalt appointed are:
First ward, Mrs. D. H. Ramsdel; Sec-
ond ward, Mrs. W. B. MacMillan; Third
ward, Mrs. John Cook, acting; Fourth
ward, Mrs. H. J. Brown; Fifth ward,
Mrs. F. P. Ward; Sixth ward, Mrs. L.
McBride; Seventh ward, Mrs. C. 0.
Davis.
The program of the Dollar-a-Month
club was presented to the Rotary club
on Wednesday at their regular meet-
in. The movement was heartily en-
dorsed and its secretary, Mr. Charles
A. Sink, was asked to present the mat-'
ter to the 300 affiliated Rotary clubs.
Shirts made to measure. G. H. Wild
Co., Leading Merchant Tailors. State
St. tf

1716 Heels

Try The Daily for service.

on
1916 Feet
You wear a 1916 hat, a 1916
suit.
But you wear 1716 heels if you
wear leather heels.
You drive a 1916 car, use 1916
office or shop equipment, live
.in a 1916 house.
But your leather heels are out
of date.
Leather heels are as obsolete
as mustache cups, celluloid
dickeys and powdered peri-
wigs. They aren't adaptable
to modern conditions.
This is the day of rubber
heels. They are individual
sh ockabsorbers-spine savers
-that make the hardest pave-
ments as soft as a Brussels
carpet.
They are made for 1916 pave.
ments.
Bring your heels up-to-date.
Wear O'Sullivan's Reels of
New Live Rubber.
When you buy your new shoes, buy
them O'Sullivanized.
Insist on O'Sullivanized shoes; the
new five rubber heels give the great-
est wear with the greatest resiliency.
Copyright, 1918,0'S, R. Co.
J a.

.-

.....

-

Ca
for
ar
lad
go
eas

Uc
esar Was a Tough Nut
the Briton to crack-and his "Comment-
es" are even worse for the modern college
1. Reading them calls for a'keen brain in a
od body. School and college problems are
sy for the lad who eats
hredded Wheat
I keeps a clear brain and stipple, elastic muscles
dy for the combat in class room or athletic field.
redded Wheat contains all the-,nutritive material
the whole wheat grain and its daily use keeps the
mach sweet and clean and the bowels healthy
I active. It is the favorite food of men and women
o do things with hand or brain. It is on the train-
table of nearly every college and university in the
ited States and Canada. Deliciously satisfying and
taining when served with milk or cream, or in com-
ation with fresh fruits. It contains more real nutri-
nt than meat or eggs and costs much less.

-and
rea
Shr
in t
sto
and
wh
ing
Un
sus
bin
me

Made only by
The Shredded Wheat Company,

Niagara Falls, N. Y.

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