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March 03, 1917 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1917-03-03

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THER

r Lit i1a

FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

juatt

UNITED PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT
WIRE SERVICE

I

VOL. XXVII. No. 105. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 1917. PRICE FIVE CENTS.

r t

STONE REFUSES TO
ACT AS PILOT FOR
"ATORITIY BILL"1
DECLARES HE IS OUT OF "SYM-
PATHY" WITH PRESENT
MEASURE
URGES AMENDMENT TO
HALT WILSON'S POWER
Senator Hitchcock Terms Move
"Emergency," and Accepts Task
of Pilot in Upper House
BULLETIN
Washington, March 2.-In a last
determined effort to whip his
forces into line and prevent the
extra session which Senator
Lodge threatened to force on the
floor of the senate, President Wil-
son late today personally directed
the battle in the senate by tele-
phone from the White House.
Washington, March 2.-Declaring
himself. "out of sympathy" with the
measure, Senator Stone, chairman of
the foreign relations committee,
startled the upper chamber late this
afternoon by refusing to pilot the "au-
thority" bill asked by the president
through the senate.
Stone asked that Senator Hitchcock
be put in charge of the bill whiqh
would empower the president to arm
American merchant ships and employ
other instrumentalities to handle the
international situation.
Stone's Amendment
"I am not in accord with the bill
as it has been framed, and shall offer
whatI consider andmportant-ameide
ment to it," he said.
Stone then demanded tliat the bill
be amended to prevent the president'
from arming munition ships and from
supplying naval gunners to operate
guns on merchant ships. After Sen-
ator Stone's amendment had been
read, Hitchcock assumed charge of the
bill.
"This is an emergency bill," said
Hitchcock, "the president asks for cer-
tain powers to maintain armed neu-
trality. He asks for authority to use
other instrumentalities. He asks for
necessary credit. He asks for a war
insurance bond. All of these were
agreed to by the senate foreign rela-
tions committee.
Hitchcock Tells View
"Power was also given in the bill
for merchant vessels to defend them-
selves from unlawful attack. I regret
that the chairman of the committee
has declined to manage this bill. The
bill does not exactly represent my
mind, but I accepted it because it was
apparently the wish of the masses and
the administration."
Hitchcock demanded the United
States at once assume a position of
armed neutrality as its safest course.
"Armed neutrality," he said, "is far
less likely to lead us into war that
the present uncertain polity. There
is more safety in a definite position
than in an uncertain one." t
PREPARE FIRST U. S. SHIP FOR
TRIP THROUGH U-BOAT ZONE
New York, March 2.-With pros-
pects of the bill permitting the arming
of American merchantmen being en-
acted into law by the end of the week,
preparations are going on at the offices

of the American line for the sailing
of their first ship with guns aboard.
It will probably be the St. Louis.
Several applications for passage
have been received since it became
certain that American vessels would
be armed, it was stated at the offices
of the line today. The St. Louis may
Barry as many as 200 passengers on
her first armed voyage.
JAX, ES A. BURNS TO TALK
AT PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
James A. Burns, president of the
Oneida institute, but better known as!
"Burns of the Mountains," will lec-
ture on "Remaking the Kentucky
Mountaineer" at the Presbyterian
church tomorrow evening.
Mr. Burns has spoken in nearly
every state in the Union. He will
stop in Ann Arbor on the way to Al-
bion from Pittsburg. The lecture is

179 Survivors of
Submarines Safe

IMPRESSIVE SPEECHES
AT LANE HALL OPENINU

Dutch Steamer Samarinda Picked Up
Persons in Bay of
Biscay
New York, March 2.-The 179 sur-
vivors of ships sunk by German sub-
marines in the Bay of Biscay were
landed at Vigo, Spain, by the Dutch
steamer Samarinda, according to the
story told by her officers on the ves-
sel's arrival today from Rotterdam.
The Samarinda picked up the 179
survivors on Feb. 3. They were of
the British steamer Port Adelaide, thc
Norwegian sailing ship Wasdale, the
Norwegian steamer Rigel, and the
Italian steamer Fanniglia.
A number of the survivors were
women, and nearly all were suffering
from exposure when picked up in the
open sea from their life boats.
British Vessel Sinks Submarine
New Orleans, March 2.-Officers of
the steamship Knight Companion,
British vessel arriving here today, said
the ship was in a battle with a Ger-
man submarine and sank it.
According to the officers the sub-
marine opened fire at a range of 700
yards. Five shots were fired at the
Knight Companion, but none took ef-
fect. The Knight Companion's gunner
fired two shots, the last sending the
U-boat to the bottom.
REICHSTAG CLOSES
German Body to Start Sessions Again
on March 20
John Grandens
(United Press Staff Correspondent.)
Berlin, March 2.-The reichstag ses-
sions adjourned today until March 20.
Preiimaiaywork of the "parliament
has been disposed of. An announce-
ment prior to the closing today, made
public the fact that in Berlin alone a
quarter of a billion marks, or. $50,000,-
000, had been expended in aiding sol-
diers' families in the capital.
Berlin newspapers were filled today
with appeals, in ;their campaign for
enlistment in the volunteer civil war
service. Compulsory service in this
branch becomes effective April 1.
WAYS AND MEANS COMMITTEE
TO CONFER ON APPROPRIATIONS
A sub-committee of the ways and
means commitee of the state legisla-
ture at Lansing arrived in Ann Arbor
last night and will spend today con-
ferring with University authorities re-,
garding the requests made by the Uni-
versity for appropriations. Today's;
conference will affect the University
bills how pending in the legislature.
Apply at Banks for R. C. Membership
Membership in the recently organ-
ized chapter of the Red Cross can be
secured at any of the banks by apply-
ing to the cashier. No obligations are
incurred through membership in the,
society.
Dues of the chapter will be applied
on office expenses of printing and;
postage and on materials to be used1
in the manufacture of hospital sup-
plies. The office has been furnished,
by the Ann Arbor Civic association,
and the workroom is in the Ladies' Li-
brary on East.Huron street.
Various donations have been made,
including a ton of coke and a tele-
phone.-
Misses Fuller Give Program Tuesday,
Dressed in early Victorian costume,
and with harp accompaniment, the
Misses Dorothy, Rosalind, and Cynthia
Fuller will sing folk-songs gathered
from England, Ireland, and Scotland,
at 8 o'clock Tuesday evening, March

6, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. The9
exact program will be announced
later.a
A part of the proceeds of the re-
cital, which is under the auspices of,
the Woman's league, is to go to the
Red Cross association.
Tickets are on sale at the Barbour
gymnasium.
Latin-American Club Holds Meeting1
The second meeting of the Latin-
American club was held last evening,
in Newberry hall. The greater part
of the meeting was given over to the
final organization of the club and a1
discussion of proposed rules followed
by a brief talk on general topics re-
lating to the South American coun-7
tries.

TO MAKE BUILDING CENTER
CAMPUS RELIGIOUS
ACTIVITIES

OF

Enthusiasm rose to flood- tide last
night when the formal opening of the
Students' Y. M. C. A. took place in
its new quarters, Lane hall. Impres-
sive talks by the speakers on the
program to miake the new building the
center of campus religious activities
were given. President Harry B.
Hutchins, who was to voice the senti-
ment of the University faculty con-
cerning the new institution, was un-
able to attend because of unexpected
and urgent business.
The meeting which was in the hands
of H. L. Haag, '17, was opened with
musical selections by a trio of which
Abraham Gornetsky, '17, was in
charge. The Rev. Arthur W. Stalker
of the Methodist church led in prayer.
The Rev. Lloyd Douglas of the Con-
gregational church ,was the first
speaker of the evening. "The Y. M.
C. A.," he said, "has more to do with
the promulgation of Christianity than
any other organization in this world."
"The three key words for this as-
sociation to adhere to, are service, re-
ligion, and Christianity," remarked
Mr. N. C. Fetter, general secretary of
the Students' Y. M. C. A. "We want
to help the students in every problem
that confronts them. We want to
create a Christian atmosphere here.
And last of all we want to eradicate
all sectarianism and denominational-
.ism."
The final address was made by Prof.
Leroy Waterman of the semitics de-
partment. He dealt primarily with
the duties of the new association and
of its great opportunity on the cam-
pus..

MASONS

WILL MEETI

Rev. R. S. Loring Will Speak Tonight
at Masonic Temple
Every student Mason is invited to
come at 7:30 o'clock tonight to the
Masonic temple to hear an address on
the "Reflections of a Mason" which will
be given by the Rev. R. S. Loring. Fol-
lowing the address a regular meeting
of the Craftsmen club will be held.
Ten new petitions are to be presented.
The election will be held March 31.
The committee in charge of the
play has secured two dates in Detoit.
Details concerning the trip will be giv-
en out tonight. It is necessary that
every member of the cast be present
as there will be a rehearsal of the play
following the meeting. Special music
has been secured.
FRANCISCO VILLA DROPS OUT
AS FACTOR IN MEXICAN CRUX
Washington, March 2. - General
Francisco Villa is no longer consid-
ered a factor in Mexican matters.
The state department was advised
today through an American official
source, and likewise through a quota-
tion from General Murguia, a Car-
ranzista, that the former rebel lead-
er's physical condition practically
counts him out of international rela-
tions.
The American offlicial message said
that Villa's forces are scattered and
that he no longer leads his once pow-
erful group in northern Mexico.
ALUMNUS TO CONTAIN ARTICLES
BY C. H. HAMILL AND DEAN BATES
Ampng the articles to appear in the;
March Alumnus is the address given
on Washington's birthday by Charles
H. Hamill of the Chicago bar, and an
interesting report by Dean Henry M.
Bates of the Law school describing
methods used in the different law
schools of the country. This report
was prepared by Dean Bates to be de-
livered before the United States com-
mission of education in Washington.
A new version of the song, "Ann
Arbor, 'Tis of Thee," as revised by
the Michigan Alumni association of
New York City will also appear.
American Ship Rochester at Bordeau
Bordeau, March 2.-The American
steamer Rochester arrived here today,
having successfully navigated the
German submarine zone from New
York. On her way up the Gironde
river from the ocean, the Rochester
went aground, but was soon refloated.

SENATE PASSES INT
NAVAL DEFENSE8BILL
$535,000,000 MEASURE APPROVED
WITHOUT ROLL
CALL
Washington, March 2.-The admin-
istration's giant $535,000,000 navy bill,
the greatest national defense measure
ever passed by the American congress,
passed the senate late today by una-
imous consent, without a roll call.
The vote was taken under the unani-
mous agreement reached last night,
when the Democrats and Republicans,
welded by the senational international
developments of the past few days,
agreed to a safe conduct for the bill.
The anticipated filibuster by Senator
LaFollette failed to materialize.
Increased Appropriations
The bill, as passed by the senate,
carries an increased appropriation of
$166,000,000 over the house provisions.
To meet this increase, the senate au-
thorized a $150,000,000 bond issue.
Virtually every member of the sen-
ate was present. Senator LaFollette
was in the chamber when the motion
was put to vote, and offered no op-
position. The bill will go back to the
house, where it is expected to be
rushed through without delay, and be
signed by the president late tomor.
row.
Immediately Available
On motion of Senator Lodge all
moneys in the measure are made im-
mediately available. They are to be
used for appropriations and not fora
back deficiencies.
The bill provides for the following
new war vessels:
Three battle ships at $15,000,000,'
one battle cruiser at $19,000,000, three
s.out cr isers at $6,000,00, 15 destroy-
rs at. ,800,000, one destroyer tender
at $2,300,000, one submarine tender at
$1,500,000, 58 post submarines at $1,-
300,000, and 10 fleet submarines at $1,-
900,000.
Five million dollars is provided for1
the aviation department, and an ad-
ditional $1,000,000 for the purchase of
serial patents.
SENIOR LITS ENTERTAIN 100 ,
COUPLES AT DANCE IN ARMORY,
Nearly 100 couples appeared at the
Armory last night, and while Ike
Fisher himself officiated at the piano,
both senior lits and their guests, the
seior engineers, danced throughout
the evening.-
Refreshments were served shortly
after 11 o'clock. Harold A. Fitzgerald,
'17, chairman of the affair, reported
it to be a financial as well as social1
suecess.1
WOMEN TO FORM HUGE U. S..
FLAG AT VACATION MEETING
New York, March 2.-Seven hundred
and fifty young women will form thes
biggest American flag ever displayedA
when the members of the Vacation as-
sociation give their annual perform-
ance, beginning a week from Wednes-
day and continuing every night1
through Saturday, at Madison Square<
Garden.
Verne Burnett Goes to Poughkeepsiet
Verne Burnett, '17, associate editor
of The Michigan Daily, is now a re-t
porter on the Poughkeepsie Evening
Enterprise. Burnett graduated in Feb-
ruary and accepted a position with the

Detroit Free Press, but through thea
efforts of Francis McKinney, '16, city
editor of the Enterprise, left Detroit
and is with the Poughkeepsie paper.
Order Impeachment Charges Tabled
Washington, March 2.-A report1
recommending that impeachment
charges made by Representative Lind-
bergh of Minnesota against the fed-1
eral reserve board be tabled was or-
dered today by the house Judiciary
committee.
$330,000,000 Postoffice Bill Passes
Washington, March 2.-Carrying a
total of $330,000,000 the postoffice ap-i
propriation bill, as agreed to by a con-
ference of both houses, was passed by
the senate today. The bill is now ready
for the president's signature.l
Calls' U. S.-German War Certain
Paris, March 2.-Le Temps quotes1
an official of the American embassy to-#
day as asserting that war with Ger-
many is inevitable.- .

Plans for the nearing canoeing sea-
son, and further safeguarding of the
Huron river will be discussed at a
meeting tomorrow morning of the
Michigan Boat club of the University
at 910 Cornwell Place.
Divorced from the Michigan Union
last year, because it belonged in a
separate field, the Boat club put itself
upon an independent basis. Safety sta-
tions, numbering about 15, were erect-
ed at the most dangerous places along
the river. Rocks, roots, stumps, and
other obstructions, were removed from
the bed, and in co-operation with the
Michigan Edison company a part of
the dam near the. old. r
away, sl wing the flow of the current
and making canoeing safer at this
point. As a result of the work not a
single serious accident occurred dur-
ing the past boating year.
The Michigan State Telephone com-
pany stood ready to install a telephone,
but owing to the club's lack of funds,
a telephone booth was not built. Sup-
ported by more than 80 campus societ-
ies a regetta was held on June 10,
which proved quite successful. The
water carnival in the evening was xept
from being largely attended by rainy
weather.
With the new Poughkeepsie three
mile rules, if enough interest is taken,
it may some day be possible to main-
tain a Michigan shell and crew at
Barton pond.
The officers of the club are: Robert
W. Collins, '17E, commodore; W. Lee
Watson, '17E, vice-commodore; Wil-
liam T. Adams. '17, secretary; 1 . Gray
Muzzy, '17, Verne E. Bui'nett, 174, and
Louis Arentz, '17, ensigns. At present
the club has no treasurer.

LOOK AND LEARN
Have you seen them? What are
they for? Who are the chosen few
that are permitted to wear the tla-
cards with the little green figure in
their coat lapel?
Some thought it was a new or-
ganization on the campus, some
thought it was an attack on co-
education.
But the true answer was not
guessed. For let it be known that
this year's opera, "Fools' Paradise"
-do you get the connection? Yes,
those were members of the cast,
chorus, or of the various commit-
tees, and the green figure on the
little cardboards is the background
of the poster.
MICHIGAN BOAT CLUB
PLANS FOR CANOEING
ITILL HOLD MEETING TOMORROW
TO FURTHER HURON
SAFETY

WINS ORATORICAL
LEA6UE CONTEST
PLEA)S FOR EDUCATED CLASS TO
TRY TO RECONCILE LABOR
AND CAPITAL
AWARD SECON PLACE
TO LOIS E. MAY, '18
Two Highest Contestants Given Testi-
monials; Carson to Go to
Minneapolis
Pleading for the educated class of
the United States to use its efforts to
reconcile the conflict between labor
and capital, Ralph M. Carson, '17, with
his oration 'The Scholar and the So-
cialist," last night won first honors
in the Northern Oratorical league con-
test. Lois E. May, '18, with her ad-
dress; "Woman and War," was award-
ed second honors. I. S. Toplon, '17,
with his oration "The Champion of
Justice," was accorded honorable men-
tion and third place.
The two winning contestants 'were
given the Nathan M. Kaufman testi-
monials of $100 and $50, given an-
nually by Mr. Kaufman of Marquette.
Carson was also awarded the Chicago
alumni medal donated by the Chicago
Alumni association, and as winner of
the first position will represent Michi-
gan at the northern oratorical final
contest to be held in Minneapolis early'

FRESH

LITS DALNCEI

Second Informal of Season Held This
Afternoon
The freshman literary class will
hold its second informal dance at 2:30
o'clock this afternoon in Barbour gym.
Only those who have previously paid
their class dues and who present the
receipt will be admitted at this time.
After 4:30 o'clock the dance will be
open to the campus, on payment of
25 cents.
Dr. Jonathan F. Scott of the history
department and Mrs. Scott, Registrar
Arthur G. Hall and Mrs. Hall, Miss
Alice Evans, and Miss Miriam Ger-
lach will chaperon the yearlings.
Music will be furnished by Ike Fish-
er's seven-piece orchestra. Every oth-
er dance, beginning with the third, will
be a "robber" datce. To ovoid con-
fusion, these dances will be signated
on the program by a star. There will
be no receiving line.
ANN ARBOR BIRD #ThUB HOLDS
FIRST MEETING LAST NIGHT
The Ann Arbor Bird club held its
first meeting in the auditorium of the
natural science building last night.
The purpose of the club and the
proposed activities for the coming
spring were briefly outlined by Dr. E.
D. Walker This was followed by an
address by Dr. R. W. Hegner of the
zoology department, secretary of the
University of Michigan Bird club, who
talked on bird life. The lecture was
illustrated with lantern slides of wild
birds, their nests, and eggs.

The decision of the judges was clear
cut regarding the winner of the first
position, Carson receiving four firsts,
a second, and a third.
Declaring that there was an utter
lack of sympathy between the scholars
and the socialists, and that the scholar
must share the socialist's vision of a
new Jerusalem, in this issue of human
freedom, Carson showed the need for
the college trained men with his
broadness of vision in this problem
that has as its end the establishment
of those ideals which animated the
founders of our country, liberty and
justice.
Talks on Influence of Women
Lois E. May, taking for her theme
the influence of woman as a factor in
the present world, showed the oppor-
tunity that woman has in her power
In battling with the enemy of civiliza-
tion, war, by the educating of the
child in the horror and brutality of
legalized slaughter.
I. S. Toplon, '17, asserting that the
American people were for "justice at
any price," pleaded for the establish-
ment of an army and navy strong
enough to make this nation the cham-
pion of justice before all the world.
W. P. Sandford, '19, in his speech,
"Who Pays the Price?" traced the
struggle of the common people from
the time of the building of the pyra-
mids to the present age, contending
that the common people were still
paying the price, and that the con-
centration of wealth in the hands of a
few was wrecking the fabric of our
social system.
N. E. A. SUPERINTENDENTS VOTE
AGAINST MILITARY TRAINING
Kansas City, Mo., March 2.-The de-
partment of superintendents of the
National Education association today
went on record as opposed to the in-
troduction of military training and
military drill into the elementary or
secondary schools. The adoption of
the report presented by Henry Snyder,
superintendent in Jersey City, N. J.,
was practically unanimous.
Mock Trial Dissipates '17 Dignity.
The women of the Mortarboard so-
ciety threw off their seniorial dignity
at a mock trial given yesterday after-
noon at the Women's league party in
the Barbour gymnasium. An "equal
rights" court was represented at which
the case of Peck vs. Peck was tried.
Dressed to represent members' from
all strata of society, the court room
offered such a scene as might be found
among the strap-hanging multitude of
Ellis Island.
After the trial there was dancing.

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