100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 27, 1917 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1917-02-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1.

h

I

The Cadet

I

Th
.- :Classic
Ing ling

he Cadet is a Walk-Over
- a model with strik-
es that is as comfortable
as a "broad shape" on

What more do you want?
THAN LYNDON'S GUARANTEE
"Upon receipt of any roll of film we develop if you find a single defect we
will not charge you one cent for developing." And we still give you
PEACE TIME'S PRICES. Peace Time's Quality because we are still
using the same developing formula that we used before the war-we could
sell our metal for a fabulous price and "get along" the same as others do
but no! We must give you the best and that's what you get when you take
your films to LYNDON'S.
L Y N D 0 N 'S 719 N. University Ave

Ill

I B

I

Text Books

most feet.

The price of

I,

for the

l e a t h e r continues to
advance rapidly - better
get fitted soon--our pre-
sent prices range from $6
to $7.

Walk-Over Shoe Store
115 S. MAIN

*

FRATERNITIES
have unsurpassed accomodatlions for group photographs

MAIN STUDIOS
1546-48 BroadwayNew York, N.Y

Perfect Portraitures
'"Amateur Work Handed in a Pro-
fessional WAY.

619 E. Liberty St.

PHOMN 948-W
WE DO

meer.

Cleaning - Pressing - Repairing
at reasonable prices. We call for and deliver. Give us a
trial and be convinced that QUALITY is the basis for all our
work.
Ward's Kassy Kut Klothes
hone 244-R 118 E. Huron St, F. W. ALLEN, Mgr.
J/_ -_--__ - %=- - - . -x
__ * ,F,;* - .>

ILLINOIS ENGINEERS
APPLY FOR CHARTER
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF ENGI.
NEERS OF CHICAGO RECEIVES
PETITION FROM UNIVERSITY
The American Association of Engi-
neers at Chicago has received an ap-
plication for a charter for a local
chapter to be established at the Uni-
versity of Illinois. The application
was signed by 20 certified students of
the university, D. R. Norris, '17E,
heading the list.
Competition for this honor has been
very keen among the larger engineer-
ing schools of the country, and it was
only by a narrow margin that the
charter was granted to Illinois. The
chapter at Illinois will be the first
university- chapter of the engineers'
national business organization, and it
will offer great opportunities to the
student members. The organizaition
will help in the encouragement of
business training, and will give co-
operation when employment is needed.
It also gives the student the oppor-
tunity of starting a record for char-
acter and training in the files of the
national headquarters.
The establishment of this chapter at
Illinois is largely the work of one
man, D. R. Norris, '17E. Norris be-
came a student member while in the
employ of the Illinois Central railroad
during the summer vacation. His work
kept him in Chicago, and while there
he became so deeply interested in the
association that he determined to un-
dertake the formation of a student
chapter immediately upon his return
to the university in the fall. He took.
up the work last September, and it was
largely through his efforts that the
charter was finally granted.
The temporary officers of the chap-
ter are: D. R. Norris, chairman; Victor
A. Pecchig, secretary, and Harry E.
Fisher, treasurer. The requirements
of the organization are few. There is
no initiation fee, and the dues are but
$3.00 a year, $1.00 of which goes to
the Monad, the balance being used to
defray local chapter expenses. Only
juniors and seniors in good standing
are eligible for membership.
Besides the students who are inter-
ested in the new movement are several
faculty members. Professor F. H.
Newell, head of the department of civil
engineering, and Professors Ira O.
Baker and J. A. deTurk are actively
interested in the work.
Local chapters of the association are
being established in many of the large
cities, and the work is being pushed
forward rapidly. The present enroll-
ment numbers 1,590.

ARCADE
Showsat 3:.s5:3o; 8:oo; 9:3o
ioc Unless Otherwise Specified.
Phone4 96-M.
Sat.-24-Alice Joyce in "Whom the
Gods Destroy"; Charlie Chaplin in
"The Rink" (Ret.) 15c.
Mon.-26-Francis Bushman and Bev-
erly Bayne in "The Diplomatic Serv-
ice" (Ret.) Christie Comedy.
Tues.-27-Emily Stevens in "The
Wager" (Ret.) Christie Comedy.
Wed.-28-Marie Dressler in "Ti'llie
Wakes Up." Comedy.
Orpheum Theatre
Matinees, 2:00-3:30; Evening, 6.5
8:15, x:30.
Saturdays-Holidays continuous.
Tues.-27-Douglas Fairbanks in "The
Matrimaniac." Also Triangle Com-
edy. Evening, 15c. Attend matinees.
Wed.-28-Baby Marie Osborne in "Joy
and the Dragon." Also Pathe News.

Semester

S HEEHAN

t

---

Pop. Mot. AD IfV Week of
Wed. Best U II It Fb2
* G AR R I GK Fe:.26
Seats $1.50
DETROIT
AL. JOHNSON in
ROBINSON CRUSOE JR.

MAJESTIC
NOW PLAYING
Petticoats"
A Delightful Comed.
The Singing Four
Bessie Browning
McCords & Tate
The Suorey's

Rae Theatre
T(Q NlCT
The Heart of a Hero"

second

-

&,

(In Six Parts)

CO.

A Visualization
Nathan Hale,

of the Life of
founded on the

What we
do to Hats I

We make hats
We sell hats at retail
We carry a big stock
We have the latest all the time
We shape hats to fit the head
We clean and reblock hats

Thurs. !'JAZZ" BAND

I

F.

-t

' ,
\

Any time is the right time for a glass of
Morning, noon, or night-:-hr a thirst-quencher, or
just for a delicious healthful beverage-you will find
a new pleasure in every refreshing glass.
THE COCA-COLAC
HEAtlanta. Ga.
- Aga

t *
.
1*

* * * * * * * * * * * * *

LOCAL RED CROSS GROUP
CHANGES HEADQUARTERS

*
*
*

FACTORY HAT STORE
617 Packard Next to the Delta.
Gor. Packard and State

hI

CO.

I

I
I

}
' j
i

9c

Demand the genuine by full name-
nicknames encourage substitution.

Notice was given out yesterday
by the committee of the American
Red Cross organization of Ann Ar-
bor that the work now being done
is carried on in the ladies' library
building, 423 East Huron street,
instead of the Young Men's Chris-
tian association, as was announced
in The Daily on Saturday.
Those who wish to work for the
Red Cross during this week will
meet as follows in the ladies' li-
brary building: Tuesday, sewing,
Mrs. Louis P. Hall, leader; Wed-
nesday, sewing, Mrs. S. W. Clark-
son, leader; Thursday, D. A. R.
day, Mrs. W. P. Lombard. Those
who wish further information can
secure same from the leaders of
the respective meetings.
Those wishing to take the course
in Red Cross nursing, either "First
Aid" or "Hygiene and Home Care
of the Sick," are requested to come
to arrange for their classes at 8

Hack & CO*
(Established 1857)
The Cap and Gown

I

Section

Invites Senior Women of the
University to take advantage
of our excellent service in
securing Costumes for the
Junior Play ini March.

Nance, today started a fight on pro-
fessional "baby farms" in Chicago.
The action is the outgrowth of an in-
vestigation. Officials estimate that
more than 500 babies from four
months to four years old, are being
starved to death in the "baby boarding
houses," every year.
The average charge for keeping a
baby is $3.00 a week, of which the
"landlady" spends 60 cents for the
child's food, the rest being pocketed
as profit.
Besides crowding dozens of babies
into filthy hovels, where they slowly
die of mal-nutrition, commonly known
as starvation, and attendant diseases,
many of the houses are abortion mills,
where a baby will be "disposed of,"
for $25 or $50, the investigators found.
Babies are said to be carried out for
burial in suitcases.
"About one-fourth of the babies are
illegitimate," said Arthur A. Guild,
officer of the juvenile protective asso-
ciation. "In many cases the children
come from homes where the father or
mother has deserted the family. And
there are a few instances where a
family is able to take care of the baby,
but does not want it around."
We operate the only exclusive ban-
quet hall in the city. The Delta.
27-8, 1-2-3-4

(THIRD FI,00R)

UNDREDS OF INFAN'TS STARVE
TO DEAT h ON "BABY FARMS"
ie in Professional Boarding Houses
JIlen 0 iiners Skimp on
Money
Chicago, Feb. 26.-The city council
ealth committee and juvenile court
fhcials headed by Alderman Willis O.

The board of review of the city
council will meet at 2 o'clock this
afternoon to look over the assessment
rolls for sewers of the city, of the
pavement on Catherine street, and a
grading on Edward street.
The membership committee of the
Ann Arbor chapter of the American
Red Cross society will 'meet at 4:30
o'clock this afternoon in Lane hall.
All the ministers of the city have beer.
added to the committee.
The board of directors of the Civic
association will meet at 7:30 o'clock
tonight in the association's room in
the city hall.
The 52nd meeting of the Michigan
Schoolmasters' club will be held in
this city March 29 and 30. At the
same time the third annual Short-term
State institute will meet, and will be
in session for three days..
Members of the board of review
will meet at 2 o'clock this afternoon
in the council chamber of the city
hall to hear objections to matters con-
cerning paving and sewers, and the
grading of Edwards street.
PROFESSORS TO HOLD THE
. "MIRROR UP TO NATURE"
"The Deestrick Skule," with all star
cast of University professors and
prominent Ann Arbor townspeople,
will be presented by group, two of the
Women's society of the First Congre-
gational church at 7:30 o'clock this
evening in the high school auditorium.

*
*
*
*
*

City News

o'clock Thursday evening in room
B of the law building.
* * * * * * * * * * * *

-I

I

WHAT'S GOING ON

*
*
*

Today
5 o'clock-Senior architects' meeting
in room 312 engineering building.
6:45 o'clock-Adelphi house of rep-
resentatives' banquet at Cutting cafe.
7 o'clock-Regular rehearsal of the
University band in University hall.
7 o'clock-Senior society meets at
residence of Genevieve O'Leary, 1011
Hill street.
7:15 o'clock-Senior engineer bas-
ketball practice in Waterman gym-
nasium.
7:30 o'clock--Senior lit basketball
practice in Waterman gymnasium.
7:30 o'clock-Organization of first-
aid classes by Ann Arbor branch of
American Red Cross society in west
amphitheater of medical building,
down town branch of Y. M. C. A. and
Community chapel.
7:30 o'clock-William R. Mellon ad-
vertising manager of the Burroughs
Adding Machine company talks at
7:30 o'clock tonight in room 162
natural science building.
7:30 o'clock-"Deestrick Skule" in
high school auditorium.
8 o'clock-Fresh lit basketball prac-
tice in Waterman gymnasium.
Tomorrow
2 to 5 o'clock-Junior lit elections
of president and councilman in the
corridor of the Library.

8 o'clock--Pablo Casals-Harold
Bauer concert in Hill auditorium.
U-Notices
Dr. I. H. Cummings of the Univer-
sity health service, will meet all stu-
dents interested in first-aid at 7:30
o'clock tomorrow evening in the med-
ical building. Students will be en-
rolled and assigned to classes.
The Saginaw club will hold its meet-
ing tonight at the University Y. M. C.
A. instead of the Michigan Union.
On account of the partial destruc.
tion of the Union building, the cast
and chorus of "Fools' Paradise" will
hold all rehearsals in Lane hall.
TREND TO CONTROL BY STATE
SEEN IN LATEST FOOD RIOTS
Bache Review Comments on Move-
ments of Steel and Quotations
of Stock Market
"The riots against high prices of
foods are inciting the legislators to
drastic measures for control of prices,
but these are rarely efficacious," says
the Bache Review. "The car shortage
situation is responsible for much of
the scarcity. A part of the work of
the railroads and the commerce com-
mission has been the gathering togeth-
er of empty cars in the East, and for
the last day or two, hundreds of empty
cars have been rushed from congested
points to places where needed.
Taxes on Amusements
Legislators, both state and national,
are seeking to raise revenue by taxa-
tions. The Albany legislators have
been attempting to place a tax on
movies, but has met with great difficul-
ties, and it is doubtful that such a tax
will be imposed. The state of New
York is trying to pass a bill taxing
all amusements, with the exception of
church and county fairs, in proportion
to the amount of money taken in by
the firms concerned.
Profits in Steel
The net profits of the Steel corpora-
tion during its 15 3-4 years of opera-
ation have aggregated as much as $1,-
270,000,000. Dividendssamounting to
110 1-4 per cent on the 7 per cent pre-
ferred stock have called for $421,000,-
000; and upon the common stock divi-
dends totaling 52 1-2 per cent and
calling for $267,000,000 have been
paid.
Market Situation
Since the decline, caused by the first
outbreak of indiscriminate submarine
aggression, the stock market has been
showing a belief in the stability of val-
ties. Its course after recovery has
been influenced by day-to-day hap-
penings. Until the permanent effect
upon the export trade is weighed up
activity must be curtailed-stocks are
in strong hands and the level of
prices is comparatively low.
We operate the only exclusive ban-
quet hall in the city. The Delta.
27-8, 1-2--4

Play, "NATHAN HALE," by
Clyde Fitch.
Nathan Hale is a character
you are all familiar with yet you
really do not know him or the
deds he perform]ed until you
have seen the characterization
of him given by Robert Warwick
in "The heart of a hero," the
latest World Picture Brady-
Made. Take a tip from one who
knows and ponder on this crit-
ic's advice.
Also
"PEARL OF THE ARMY"
The great Preparedness Serial.
Admission-10 cents.
TrE IER TO TE RAE
The Little Iheatre, with the
Big Show
COMING
Wednesday
THEDA BARA
Also New $50,000.00 Fox Comedy
Thursday
FRANCIS X. BUSHMAN
Saturday
MARGUERITE CLARK
and Fox Comedy
SEE IT AT THE RAE
PRESIDENT ASKS ARMED
NEUTRALITY FOR STEAMERS
(Continued from Page One.)
safe majority. The chief purpose of
the enactments asked by the president
is to protect American shipping and
Republicans as well as Democrats are
commended to this policy.
Senator Thompson's View
Senator Thompson of Michigan pre-
sented his views as follows:
"It is a monstrous proposition. No
dictator could ask for more authority.
For atresolution grantingsweeping
authority, it will be defeated until
March 4."
Senator Weeks of Massachusetts
said:
"I do not believe any resolution
which grants the president sweeping
authority will be adopted."
Senator Jones of Washington said:
"It is a beautifully expressed request
for more power, and a subtle expres-
sion of distrust of the congress. I do
not think we will sign any blank
checks."
LaFollette Seems Disturbed
Senator LaFollette was apparently
much disturbed over the request of the
president for authority. He listened to
it in the house, and when it was
through, threw back his shoulders and
doubled his fist as if he were in a
mood to make a fight. Some took this
to mean that a resolution of some com-
prehensive sort granting undefined
powers to the president, may encoun-
ter protracted opposition.
Let us plan a unique dinner dance
for you. Delta Cafe. 27-8, 1-2-34

Dancing classes and private
at the Packard Academy.

lessons
tt

D. E. GRENNAN
CUSTOM TAILOR

SPRING IS HERE!

606 EAST.

LIBERTY STREET

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan