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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1916 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11VHlV Ll-11L 1

G. H. Wild Co.
Leading Merchant Tailors
State St.

r
',

111I1111111111111.t1t l i~ltll llllll1111!!1!ll ll l t111tlI ll llltillilliltill lil
TTENTION STUDENTS-
We are now in a better position to.serve your wants than
before. We can save you money.
SEEING IS BELIEVING
Allmendinger Music Shop
ie 1692 122 B. Liberty St.
SPECIAL ON UKULELES -
tIll ll11l llillllillllltllililtlllllllll ll llll11tIlll il 1111 |1111lllillllllllll

Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions : by carrier, $2.50; by mail, $3.00.
Want ad. stations: Quarry's; Students' Sup-
ply Store; The Delta, cor. State and Packard.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words
in length, or notices of events will be pub-
lished in The Daily if left at the office in the
Ann Arbor Press Bldg., or in the notice box
in the west corridor of the general library,
where the notices are collected at 7:30 o'clock
each evening.
John C. B. Parker.........Managing Editor
Clarence T. Fishleigh ...Business Manager
Conrad N. Church.............News Editor
Lee E. Joslyn.... ..........City Editor
Harold A. Fitzgerald....... .Sports" Editor
Harold C. L. Jackson......Telegraph Editor
Verne E. Burnett...........Associate Editor
Golda Ginsburg............Women's Editor
Carleton W. Reade.........Statistical Editor
J. E. Campbell....Assistant Business Manager
C. Philip Emery..Assistant Business Manager
Roscoe R. Rau....Assistant Business Manager
Fred M. Sutter... Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
L. S. Thompson Henley Hill
Reporters,
B. A. Swaney C. W. Neumann
W. R. Atlas C. C. Andrews
E. L. Zeigler I. C. Garrison
C. M. Jickling E. A. Baumgarth
Business Staff
Bernard Wohl J. E. Robiison
Paul E. Cholette Harry R. Louis
E. Reed Hunt. Harold J. Lance
Earl F. Ganschow Walter R. Payne
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1916.
Night Editor-B. A. Swaney
There will be a meeting of all the
members of the news staff, sport staff,
and try-outs at 12:40 o'clock today in
the reportorial rooms.

DR. RICE
Is
HERE
Did you hear him
last evening? Go
tonight 7:15, M. E.
Church Auditor-
ium.

STUDENT NEEDS ARE MANY
slat they can e,.11 h
r_ r
- ~*
-WA-HR~S-
VNIVERSITY BOOKSTORES
mominunumuinunnnunnnunnuniin auunuh r

UNIVERSITY
New ad
TEXT BOOKS __--__-_
DRAWING INSTRMENTS
SVPPLIES OF ALL KINDS
* Slater Book Shop ....-:

DETROIT UNITED LINES'
ween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
s run on Eastern time, one hour faster
ocal time.
owit Limited and Express Cars-8 :o a.
,d hourly to 7:10 p. in., 9:10 p. mn.
amazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. m. and
two hours to 6:48 p. in.; to Lansing,
. m.
kson Express Cars-( Local stops west of
Arbor)- :48 a. in. and every two hours
8 p. mn.
al Cars Eastbound-5:35 a. m, 6:40 a.
o5-a. m. and every two hours to 7:05 p.
:05 p. m., 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. m. to
anti only, 9:20 a. m., 9:5o a. M., 2:05 p.
:o5 p. n., ii1:45 P. im., 1 :1o a. mn., 1:20
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
al Cars Westbound-6:o5 a. m., 7:50 a.
:2o p. m.. 12:20 a. m.
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
offers the Best in Modern Banking
SECURITY. . . EFFICIENICY
nent and Pleasant Quarters. You Will
eased With Our Service. Two offices
05 S. Main St. : : 330 S. State St.
[PRI TERS of all makes
ie or Rent, Cleaning &
pairingTYPEWRITING &
D OGRAPHING. SUPPLIES
0. ID, Mo rr 11

We Offer You
SECURITY - - SERVICE - -LOCATION
Resources $3,8oo, ooo
Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Main Office--
Northwest Corner Main and Huron
Branch Office- -
707 North University Ave.
Phone 2402 Open evenings by appointment
BEAUTY SHOP
MISS MABLE ROWE
Shampooing, Manicuring, Massage, &
Chiropody
Switches, Curls. Cosmetics, Ornaments
First National bank Bldg. Room 503
Ann Arbor, Mich.
FIRST NATL. BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $rooooo Surplus and Profit $65,ooo
DIRECTORS
Wirt Cornwell Waldo M. Abbott
Geo. W. Patterson Harry M. Hawley
S. W. Clarkson Harrison Soule
Fred Schmid D. B. Sutton
E. D. Kinnie
After the Show stop at
SUGAR BOWL
109 S. Main St.
We make our own Candies and
Ice Cream in our Sanitary Shop

..

s State

582-J

iEORGE BISCHOFF
FL OR 1ST
ice Cut Flowevs and Plants
Chapin St. Ann Arbor,'Mich.
PHONE 809 M
STOP AT
U TTLE'S
338 S. STATE
or sodas and lunches

to make appointments for heart and
lung examinations.
o' en All houses of five or more women
must send the names of their repre-
sentatives to the board of representa-
ere will be an important rehears- tives of the Womens' League, to Dean
the old members of the Girls' Jordan by Wednesday, October 11.
club this afternoon, at 5:00 Women desiring to try out for the
k in Sarah Caswell Angell hall! Gargoyle may see the editor any aft-
ernoon from 2:30 to 4:00 o'clock.
an Jordan will speak at the ves- ft
IAll notices for the 'Womens eolumn

r services at Newberry hall this
ternoon at 5:00 o'clock. Hereafter
sper services will be held on Thurs-
,y afternoons instead of Wednesdays,
last year.
All schedules for required gymnas-.
m work will be posted on the bulletin
ard in Barbour Gymnasium, Wed-
sday, October 11, All students,
eshmen, sophomores, and upper class
omen who are taking required gym-
,sium work, will begin work, on
ednesday or Thursday, according to
ledule. Sophomores will begin on{
hursday, Freshmen on Friday. All,
asses will hold their first meetings
the gymnasium.
Locker tickets should be purchased
the treasurer's office, and should be
changed for lockers during the
orning hours this week, at the gym-]
sium.
Gymnasium clothes may be purchas-
afternoons this week at the gym-
sium.
All Freshmen must have had their
ysical examinations by today.
All upper class girls who are tak-
g any kind of gymnasium work this
ar must see Miss Evans this week,
Does your musical instrument need
pairs? Take it to Schaeberle & Son,
0 South Main street, for first-class
ork. oct3tf
You could hang yourself with a
avs cravat-but it would be fool-
h. Davis at 119 Main. oct5,7,10,14.
O. G. Andres for shoe repairing. 222
State. 'Phone 1718-1. tues-eod

of The Daily should be put in the boxy
in the reading room in the Library,
before 1:00 o'clock of the day pre-
ceeding their appearance. The wo-
men's editor is at The Daily office
every day from 1:00 to 2:00 o'clock,
and will receive any notices which may
have been delayed.
Women interested in working on
The Daily should see the women's
editor Wednesday afternoon, from
1:30 to 2:30 o'clock.
DEAN EFFINGER TO GIVE TALK
TODAY AT KALAMAZOO COLLEGE
Dean John R. Effinger of the Lit-
erary college left yesterday for Kala-
mazoo where he will give the Angell
memorial address in connection with
the Angell memorial exercises to be
held today at Kalamazoo college.
Following his address, Dean Effinger
will leave for Menominee where on
Thursday he will take part in the
program of the meeting of the Upper
Peninsula Educational association.
The program will be in the form of a
symposium in which six speakers will.
take part. Each will speak on the
subject, "The Function of Schools in
Preparedness for Peace."
While Dean Effinger is in Kalama-
zoo he will visit the schools. He is
a member of the examining commit-
tee of Kalamazoo college.
"THE KEMPF MUSIC STUDIOS"
Piano, voice, pipe organ. 312 South
Division street. 'Phone 212-J. Leave
orders for fine piano tuning.

GETTING THE HABIT.
Now that the hurry and bustle of
college opening is over it is time to
stop and take stock of things. Is the
daily life we are leading as university
students a Jumbled mass of work and
pleasure, or is it a well ordered pro-
gram of study and recreation? Many
of us spend too much time indoors;
studying, or reading, or watching mov-
ing pictures. Many others go to the
other extreme, spending nearly all of
their time out-of-doors, and neglecting
their studies.
This is the time of year to get a
system. Plan your day, as to the ap-
proximate number of hours you will
study, exercise and sleep. The an-
nual fall tennis tournament is sched-
uled to start this afternoon. If you
are interested in the court game, sign
up in the match. Then there are the
golf links, the class gridirons, and it
never is very hard to get up a scrub
game of baseball. If for some reason
you do not engage in any sport, there
are the boulevards. At no time of the
year is the Huron valleymore beauti-
ful. The autumn foliage with its rich
shades of brown, and red, and yellow,
transform it into a succession of mag-
nificent pictures.
Plan to spend a certain part of your
day in one or another of these recrea-
tions; and you will find it much easier
to concentrate in study for tomor-
row's quiz.
MICHIGAN'S UPPER ROOM
What is the Upper Room?
A senior asked this question yester-
day of four other seniors, and only one
could answer correctly. It might be
inferred thus that a large portion of
the campus is ignorant about the Up-
per Room; which will have a new $40,-
000 home on State street to be started
next spring.
The Michigan Daily likes to expose
good things in preference to bad
things. Investigation shows that the
Upper Room organization has been
working along quietly, powerfully, and
with worthy results. The highest
praise perhaps, which might be offer-
ed, consists in showing the facts of the
case.
The Upper Room bible class consist-
ed last year of 312 members, and this
year it is sure of a membership of
400. The Upper Room is the main
part of the Bible Chair, an organiza-
tion which includes four other similar
classes making a total of 500 to 600.
members. Other universities which
have bible chairs, consist of Virginia,
Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.
Twenty-five years ago in Bulter
College, at Indianapolis, Prof. Thomas
M. Iden, organized the Upper Room
class. He continued the' name for a
similar class when he was made pro-
fessor of chemistry, and dean, at the
Kansas Teachers' College, at Emporia,
Kansas. Three years ago, Professor
Iden came to Michigan and brought
some of his Kansas pupils with him.
Around a small nucleus, he has built
up an important factor in Michigan
life. He conducts his discussion
groups on a practical basis, and only
questions of live interest to the stu-
dents are taken. Co-operation is ef-

*=NI
fected with the University Y. M. C. A.
The aim is to teach the fundamental
questions of life, and to help students
learn character along with culture.
Perhaps the best proof of the Upper
Room's strength is the fact that former
members of the Upper Room class have
just completed a fund of nearly $40,-
000, so that even better opportunities
might be provided for men of Mich-
igan in the coming years.
SNAKE DANCE STUDENTS
TO HONOR__OLD LORY
C. X. Oldrin Plans Big Celebration
When Company I Comes
Home
"There is going to be some time
in this town all right, when the boys
of Company I get back!"
Among all the citizens of Ann Ar-
bor who thus express their resolution
to fete the iocal members of the Mich-
igan National Guard on their return
from Mexico, none is more emphatic
and sincere in his statements than Mr.
Charles M. Oldrin, of Schaeberle &
Son company. And it is due to the
boundless interest of Mr. Oldrin in
the boys, that Old Glory flies in the
breeze right in the center of the city
fn honor of Company I.
Late last June, something over a
hundred men, 21 of whom were Michi-
gan students, entrained for Grayling
preparatory to leaving for the border.
Their departure was a very quiet af-
fair, not even a band being there to
cheer them up. In Detroit the streets
were black with people, all cheering,
and fighting to get a last handclasp.
The contrast nettled Mr. Oldrin and
during the next two months he began
a campaign among the local business
men and residents to raise enough
money for a flag in honor of the boys.
And then, late in August, all of the
townspeople who could, crowd into
Hilliauditorium were thrilled when the
big flag, 50 by 30 feet, fluttered out its
huge length above their heads like a
gigantic but beautiful butterfly. This
was the culmination of impressive
ceremonies within the auditorium.
Afterwards the citizens followed the
veterans of the Civil and Spanish-
American wars as they escorted the
flag down town. And with bugle calls
resounding in the summer air, the flag
was raised to its present position
above Main street, suspended on a
seven-strand steel cable from the top
of the First National Bank building
to the tower of the courthouse.
Every day, if the weather permits,
the flag is swung out over the street
at 11:00 o'clock in the morning. At
5:30 o'clock in the afternoon it is
taken down and the "storm flag" put
out in its place. And throughout the
night a floodlight from the roof of the
Ann Arbor Savings Bank building
bathes the flag in a luminous glow.
Yesterday the weather was somewhat
inclement, and therefor the storm flag,
which is just half the size of the larger
banner, was flown.
It is quite a problem to keep the
flag straight in windy weather and Mr.
Oldrin has found it necessary more
than once to ride out on the cable in
a sort of life-saver's car and untangle
the folds of the flag.
Mr. Oldrin regrets that the flag must
be taken down without the proper
bugle calls each night and hoped to
secure the services of the Varsity
band on Sundays to honor the flag.
This has been found impossible. But
Mr. Oldrin has made another sugges-
tion which quite admits of accomplish-

ment. When the band leads the stu-
dents around the town in a good old
snake dance after the Varsity beats
M. A. C., Syracuse and Pennsylvania,
he would have it strike up the "Star
Sangled Banner" when passing under
the flag and the students doff their
hats to Old Glory.

CALL AT
The Fountain of Youth
WHEN YOU WANT
Candies -- LightLunches -- Refreshments
The New State Street Ice Cream Parlor
CORNLR LIVERTY
REMEMBBR THAT
"Flanders is to flowers what Sterling is to Silver"
When ever an occasion arises where you want the freshest
blossoms grown, just call 294 and your order will be taken care
of in the best possible manner. Corsages are our speciality. Our
ideas are always the newest.
We are also members of the Florists Telegraph Delivery Service.
Flowers sent to all the world by wire.
FLANDERS
LOWERS
213 E. LIBERTY ST. PHONE 294

0
2:d

b

1l..

QMART
for a go
give me a;
slowly an'.j
VELVET gets i
ness that way-t
natural ageing.

IJ

POF PILLSBURY URGES
Psychology Head Discusses Degen-
erates Before University of
Iowa Students
That the increasing number of
criminals can only be curtailed by a
series of tests, made possible by the
use of psychology, was the statement
of Prof. W. D. Pillsbury, of the psy-
chology department in an recent ad-
dress before the students of the Uni-
versity of Iowa.
"There will be an increasing number
of criminals until those who are men-
tally efficient are made economically
of. value. This can be accomplished
only by a series of tests which are
something new in the field of psycho-
logy. You should understand man as
you do a machine; his mental machine
as well as his material machine. The
problem of the psychologist of today
in his tests of the mentally deficient
that he may discover who is not cap-
able of life in society, is, what in-
dividual persons will do under certain.
conditions."
Professor Pillsbury then went on to
discuss the morons, who through their
mental defectiveness, are a menace to
society. Provisions of a suitable place
where these may be sent, to prepare
them to go back into society, or a
means of isolating them from society,
was also discussed by Dr. Pillsbury.
MIRIAM GERLACH APPOINTED
ASSISTANT TO DEAN OF WOMEN
Miss Miriam Gerlach, of the Uni-
versity of Illinois, has been appointed
by the Board of Regents to act as as-
sistant to the dean of women, as well
as secretary. Miss Gerlach took her
degree in 1911, since which time she
has been teaching English in the man-
ual training high school in Indian-
apolis. She is to be found in her of-
fice in Barbour gymnasium every day
from 9:00 to 12:00 o'clock in the morn-
ing, and from 2:00 to 4:00 o'clock in
the afternoon.

3'

Takes Pictures
Develops Films
makes Prints
and Enlarge-
713 E. Uments

no

To learn tyewriting well
requires alose applioatiom
A t §wrjter andfe
instruction boo from
O.D.Morrill. 322 S State1
will do the rest.
ASKS THATCROWD STAND

klecs may be all right but 0
od, honest workin' partner
man that's got his learnim' 0
naturally.
its good-.
woyears
_ _ _ wrrrrwwrwur

t

WRITER
SEATS
DAY'S

SUGGESTS THAT NO
BE PROVIDED AT SUN-
ANN ARBOR SERMON.

Editor The Michigan Daily:
Billy Sunday is to speak in Ann
Arbor on October 23. 1 think it is rea-
sonable to conclude that Weinberg's
colliseum will not seat one-third of
the people who will want to hear Sun-
day's famous talk on "Booze." Why
not make the most of this opportunity
to allow as many people as possible
to hear this famous preacher? If seats
are installed the place will not seat
more than one-half as many as it will
be possible to accommodate if people
stand. Usually two can stand in the
same space that is required for one.
Surely if Mr. Sunday can stand and
preach for an hour his hearers can
stand and listen for that length of
time, and by so doing twice as many
will have a chance to hear him. I
make this suggestion to the commit-
tee on arrangements for the benefit of
those who greatly desire to hear Sun-
day but who will not be able to do so
if seats are installed.
Respectfully,
GEORGE HORTON.
'Phone 600 for signs and show cards.
oct3 to 29
Buy a Davis shirt, $1 to $4, and a
tie with the money saved. Davis at
119 Main. oct5,7,10,14

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