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October 10, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-10-10

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.NN ARBOR-
FAIR AND
COLDER

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DAI

UNITED PRESS WIF
DAY AND NIGHT SERVICE
THE ONLY MORNING PAPER
ANN ARBOR

-MMMS

L.

VOL. XXVII. No. 7AANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1916 PRICE FIVE C:

SUBMARINE U53
DISSAPPEARS AFTER1
SINKING_6 SHIPS
ADMIRAL GLEVES DOUBTS PRES-
ENCE OF MORE THAN ONE t
SUBMERSIBLE.
BERNSTORFF VISITS WILSON;
Daniels Reports Germans Apparently1
Comply With International
Law Rulings.
Newport, R. L, Oct. 9.-Kaiser Wil-
helm's submarine U-3, after bringing
the war to the very doors of America,
had disappeared this afternoon, al-
though the whole Atlantic seaboard
was on edge awaiting news of the
grim little submersible, and allied war-
ships patrolled the waters off the;
coast.
Not one word concerning the move-1
ment of the U-53 filtered in during
the day. Admiral Gleves expressed'
the conviction tonight that only one
;ubmarine was engaged in the raid!
that sent six unarmed ships to the
bottom. Other sources had previously
reported that at least two and possi-
bly three had been engaged. Late this
afternoon the entire American torpedo1
flotilla stationed here was ordered out
to search for the missing crew of the
steamer Kingston, one of the victims,
of the submersible.
Two survivors of the Kingston were
picked up late in the day off the
Nantucket light ship. Wild rumors
were circulated this afternoon that
three allied warships searching for the
U-53 had been torpedoed off Nantucket
but the commandant of the training
station reported that no wireless con-
taining such information had been re-
ceived.
Ambassador Visits White House
(By Roger J. Bender, United Press
Staff Correspondent.)
Long Branch, N. J., Oct. 9.-Less
than an hour after President Wilson
had publicly announced he would hold..
Germany to a "complete fulfillment"
of her submarine pledges, Ambassador
von Bernstorff late this afternoon as-
sured the President that the German
government intends to keep its prom-
ises made during the Lusitania ne-
gotiations. The President's statement
was issued just before the German
ambassador arrived at the summer
white house for the first conference
these two have held in many months.
Von Bernstorff was with the President
15 minutes. They did not discuss peace.
The President was advised this aft-
ernoon In a preliminary report from
Secretary of the Navy Daniels that the
German submarine active in the steam-
ship lines off Nantucket had appar-
ently complied with all rules of in-
ternational law before acting. Daniels
was expected to submit a detailed re-
port later. The German government,
President Wilson declared in a state-
ment this afternoon, "will be held to
the complete fulfillment of its prom-
ises to the government of the United
States," regarding its conduct of sub-
marine warfare.
The President issued this statement:
"The government will of course first
imform itself as to all the facts that
there may be no mistake or doubt so
far as they are concerned and this

country may rest assured that the
German government will -be held to
the complete fulfillment of its prom-
ises to the government of the United
States. I have no right to question
their willingness to fulfill them.
(Signed) "WOODROW WILSON."
In official circles the situation was
regarded as fraught with. ominous pos-
sibilities, but pending definite informa-
(Continued on Page Six.)

U-. Ioat Keeps
Ships in Ports
New York, Oct. 9.-Terror caused
by the U-boat raids off the New Eng-
land coast held ships in Atlantic sea
board ports today. Only a single
British freighter cleared this port
while a number of vessels, including
the Frederick VIII, bearing American
Ambassador Gerard, were in or near
the danger zone. Ships of the Inter-
national Mercantile Marine company
were ordered to remain at anchor un-
til further notice.
The Scandinavian American liner
Frederick VIII, will dock here at 8:00
o'clock tomorrow, according to a wire-
less from her captain today.
Glee Club Holds
Final Try-outs
The final try-outs for the Glee club,'
according to Director Theodore Harri-
son, will3be held at the School of Mu-
sic at 7:00 o'clock tomorrow evening.
Up to date there have been two try-
outs and there are still vacancies in
the various sections to be filled. All
those who have talent along this line
are urged to attend the try-out.
This year the musical clubs will
take a ten thousand-mile trip, the'
greatest one ever undertaken by the
students of this university. The
itinerary will include stops at Chicago,
St. Louis, Omaha, Kansas City, Denver,
Sterling, Colo., Laramie, Wyo., Salt
Lake City, San Francisco, Berkeley, Los
Angeles, Pasadena, San Diego, Phoe-
nix, Ariz., Dallas, Houston and El
Paso, Texas; New Orleans, Memphis,
Tenn., La Porte, Ind., and Chicago.
Twenty-five men in each club will
be taken on the trip across the states.
Elaborate preparations are being made
along the route for the entertainment
of the men by the various alumni as-
sociations.
Earl V. Moore, director of the Man-'
dolin club, was well pleased with the
instrumental try-outs.
FACULTY RECITAL TOMORROW
Varied Program Marks First Appear-
ance of Artists in Hill
Auditorium.
The first complimentary faculty re-
cital will be held in Hill auditorium
tomorrow afternoon at 4:15 o'clock.
The general public as well as the stu-
dent body is cordially invited to at-
tend.
The following program will be
given:
Quartet, E flat, Op. 12.... Mendelssohn
Adagio non troppo-Allegro non
taradanto; Canzonetta (Allegret-
to); Andante expressivo; Molto
allegro e.vivace.
Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Lockwood, vio-
lins; A. J. Whitmire, viola; Lee N.
Parker, cello.
From the Land of the Sky-blue Wa-
ter .................. .. Cadman
The Moon Drops Low,
The Secret............... ....Scott
Mr. Kenneth N. Westerman.
Capriccio, Op. 76, No. 5......Brahms
Undine ........................Ravel
Spanish Rhapsody...............Liszt
Mr. Albert Lockwood.
Frances Louise Hamilton, accom-
panist.
On account of the non-arrival of
Miss Johnson's harp, she will make
her Ann Arbor debut at the next con-
cert, instead of at this time as pre-
viously announced.
Classical Club Will Meet Tonight

The Classical club will meet for the
first time this year at 7:15 o'clock this
evening, in room A, Memorial hall.
Plans for the current year will be
discussed, and some of the standing
committees will be appointed. There
is also other important business to
be transacted; and it is especially
urged that all members of the club
be present.

MICHIGAN UNION
STARTS CAMPAIGN
FR6 MEMBERS(

"Golden Rule" Warden Resigns
Buffalo, Oct. 9.-Thomas Mott Osborne, philanthropist, reformer and
"golden rule" warden of Sing Sing prison, has resigned as warden, Su-
perintendent of Prisons Carter announced this afternoon. The resigna-
tion will take effect October 16th. Osborne retired voluntarily, Carter said,
the resignation, however, was not entirely unexpected.
Several escapes of other prisoners from Sing Sing during the past
few months had aroused the displeasure of the state superintendent, who
on one occasion declared that if the escapes did not stop something would
be done. In a speech before the American Prison association here Sat-
urday, Carter advocated "a little more sense and a little less sentimental
slush in prison matters."~

Banquet Tendered Captains of
ious Competing Teams
in Contest

Var.

DISCUSS METHODS TO BE USED
Work to Be Placed Upon Competitive
Basis; Winner to be Taken
on Opera Trip
The opening gun of the Michigan
Union's hovse to house membership
campaign was fired last evening, when
a banquet was tendered the captains
of the various competing teams, at the
Union building at 6:00 o'clock.
During the general discussion which
followed the dinner, final arrange-
ments were made concerning the
methods to be employed in this fall
campaign which is to deal both with
life and yearly memberships.
In order to increase the enthusiasm
among the sub-committeemen, it was
decided to place the work upon a com-
petitive basis, the winners to receive
appointments to various important
Union committees, according to the
number of points gained by them. The
following basis of points was adopted:
each yearly membership shall count
one point, each pledge to a life mem-
bership three points, and each life
membership, upon the first payment,
will count five points. The captain of
the winning team is to receive a com-
plimentary trip with the Union Opera
cast on the annual tour.
This evening a supper will be given
at 5:30 o'clock at the Union, for the
captains and members of the various
committees. Following this, talks will
be given by Staats Abrams, '17E, Glen
M. Coulter, president of the Union,
Robert Collins, 17E, and-Joseph Meade,
'17E, general chairman in charge of
the campaign.
The following men have been chosen
as captains for the various competing
committees: F. J. Thieme, Jr., '18E,
Harold A. Taylor, '17E, T. S. Cox, '17,
Wm. K. Niemann, '17, J. W. Neumann,
'17, J. D. Hibbard, '18E, C. W. Brain-
ard, '18M, J. W. Langs, '17-'19L, Carl
Neumann, '18, C. W. Fischer, '18,
Bernard Stenberg, '17E, Waldo McKee,
'18E, E. B. Palmer, '17, Ferris Fitch,
'17L, Allan Livingston, '18E, and Kemp
S. Burge, '17.
OR, RICE TO ADDRESS WOMEN
Remembered as Speaker at 1914 "Pep"
Mass Meeting.
Dr. Rice last night gave the first of
a series of addresses that he will de-
liver this week at the Methodist
church in the interests of the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A.
He took for his theme the tempta-
tions that assail the university student
and pleaded with his hearers not to
give the devil the advantage by giving
him "the under-hold."
The meetings, which are to be held
every night this week, are to be de-
voted to discussions of constructive
Christianity, and Dr. Rice has an-
nounced that in line with this pur-
pose he will be glad to consult with
any student on Thursday, Friday, or
Saturday afternoons.
Dr. Rice will be remembered as the
speaker at the "pep" mass meeting
held in the fall of 1914, and the stu-
dents who heard him then will un-
doubtedly be glad to have this oppor-
tunity to hear him again.
Dr. Rice has consented to talk to
both university women and men. This
was arranged because of the great de-
mand which the women have made
for an opportunity to hear him.

ALLIES CONTINUE
GAINS ON SOMME
British Cavalry Pursues Bulgarians;
Russians Destroy Turkish Boats
in Torpedo Raid.

HUGHES ATTACKS
EIGHT-HOUR LAW
Candidate Hits Hard at Administra-
tion in Third Campaign
Tour Speech.

LARGE TRANSPORT

SUNKI ANALYSIS OF SETTLEMENT

London, Oct. 9.-Further allied vic-
tories were reported from various war
fronts today. On the Somme the Brit-
ish war office announced allied troops
are now within two miles of Bapaume,
the immediate objective of their great
drive. They pushed forward today
east of Le Sars. For the first time it
was stated the allies are now fighting
on territory north of the Ancre brook.
In the Balkans, occupation of the
villages of Cavearmah, Ormanli, and
Haznatar by the British was an-
nounced and British cavalry has
joined in pursuit of fleeing Bulgarians
and has reached the line of Kararaska-
Homondos. After several unsuccess-
ful attacks against the Bulgarian
lines on the Dobrudja the Russo-Rou-
manians have withdrawn to their
former positions.
Petrograd seemingly contradicted
this claim with the statement that "in
the Dobrudja the Russians are fortify-
ing newly conquered positions." Aus-
tro-German lines in the region of
Vladimir-Volynski have been occupied.
Destruction of numerous Turkish sail-
ing vessels by a Russian torpedo
flotilla that raided the Black Sea
ports of Samsun and Sinope was
claimed by Petrograd.
The allies suffered a serious blow
in the destruction of the transport
Gallia, bearing 2,000 French and Serb-
ian troops, by an enemy submarine.
The official Paris statement did not
indicate the location of the disaster,
but reported that 1,362 of the soldiers
had been rescued and landed at Sar-
dinia. The Gallia was a (vessel of 14,-
966 tons, built three years ago.
WORK ON YEAR BOOK STARTS
EARLY; TO INCREASE SALES
E. F. Walsh, 117, and R. W. Harbert,
'17, Secure Engraving Work
in Chicago.
With the outlook bright for a very
successful year, work has already been
started on The Michiganensian, the
University year book. The subscrip-
tion campaign will be put in motion
earlier this year than last with the
hope of a greater sale than before.
Managing Editor Edward F. Walsh, '17,
and Business Manager Ralph W. Har-
bert, '17, have just returned from a
business trip to Chicago where they
secured the highest grade of engrav-
ing for this year's edition.
It has been the general opinion of
the campus in the past that The
Michiganensian was a book to be pur-
chased by seniors only. As an au-
thentic record of all the classes on
the campus The Michiganensian should
be of great interest to every student,1
both underclassmen as well as seniors.
All seniors are asked to arrange sit-
tings for their pictures as soon as pos-
sible. Promptness in the matter will:
greatly aid the staff in the production'
of The Michiganensian.

(By Perry Arnold, United Press Staff
Correspondent.)f
Newark; N. J., Oct. 9.-=Candidate
Hughes loosed his heaviest battery of
assault on the Adamson eight-hour/
law here today in a speech inaugurat-
ing his third campaign tour. WithoutI
using names he ironically declared "do
not run away, and dream that yout
will have courage in a future day," in
referring to what he said was the
Democratic administration's "capitula-i
tion and humiliating surrender to
n4t
duress."
It was the Republican nominee's
most careful analysis of the Demo-
cratic settlement of the railroad strike,
which in his previous speeches he had
dubbed, "the paramount issue of thet
campaign." He went into great detail
to declare that the bill was not an
eight-hour measure but "merely an in-I
crease of wages by fixing a differentt
basis for calculating wages."
'He read letters dated as far back as{
July 29, 1916, to controvert the Demo-t
cratic claim that the crisis in the rail-
road situation was a "sudden" one.
The letters came from the chamberI
of commerce of the United States, urg-
ing an inquiry.-
"What is the purpose of this at-
tempt to make the public believe that
this bill fixes an eight-hour working1
day?" he asked. Manifestly in order
to endeavor to justify this extraor-
dinary action of the administration in
its abject and humiliating surrender{
of principle in demanding and secur-
ing this legislation without any proper
inquiry as the price of peace."
COMEDY CLUB TO MEET SOON,
PLAY NOW BEING SELECTED
A meeting of all members of the
Comedy club will be held in the Cercle
Francais rooms Thursday afternoon at
4:00 o'clock. A play for this year's
production is now being selected and
will be announced within a week.
Practically all of last year's cast
will be back this year, but according
to Morrison Wood, '17, there will be
lots of room for good material. Try-
outs will be held within the next
two weeks.
DAMES WILL BE HOSTESSES;
ANNOUNCE PLANS FOR YEAR.
The Michigan Dames will open the
year's program with a party next
Monday evening at Newberry hall.
The Dames are wives of University
students. For the present year, a pro-,
gram has been outlined which includes
educational meetings and talks by in-
teresting speakers, also many 'social
events. The party Monday evening is
in honor of new students' wives, all
of whom are cordially invited to be
present.

We. Be HINSODALE TO
SPEAK AT FOURTH.-1.
.F
All Classes Dismissed By 3:00 O'elock;
Students To Form In
Line
FRIDAY, OC1, 13, DATE SET
Rev. L. A. Barrett to Give Invocation;
Prof. L. M. Gram In-Charge
of Event
The fourth annual all-university ,
Convocation has been set for Friday,
October 13, at 4:00 o'clock, Prof. L. M.
Gram, of the engineering college, who
is in charge of all arrangements for
the occasion, announced yesterday. It
will be held in Hill auditorium.
Dean Wilbert B. Hinsdale, of the
Homeopathic Medical school has been
selected to give the principal speech.
He has chosen for his subject "Per-
sonal Economics." Musical numbers
for the program are being arranged
by Prof. A. A. Stanley, of the School of
Music. The invocation will be given
by the Rev. Leonard A. Barrett, of
the Presbyterian church.
As usual, there will be no classes
held after 3:00 o'clock, and the faculty
and various classes will assemble at
their designated places, as follows:
The president, board of regents,
and Dean Hinsdale, the orator of the
day, will assemble in the president's
room at 3:00 o'clock.
The members of the several facul-
ties will assemble in University hall,
where they will don their robes and
form a column of twos facing the
front entrance.
Seniors, students who have received -
degrees, other than those registered in
the Graduate school, and students
registered iA five and six year courses
who have not received degrees and
have been on the campus at least
three years, will assemble on the lawn
west of the Law building in five equal
columns of twos, with the head of the
columns in line with the north. end
of the Law building.
Juniors will assemble on the pave-
ment of North University avenue, west
of Thayer steet, in four columns of
twos, with the head of the column 50
feet west of Thayer street.
Sophomores will assemble on the
lawn west of the north wing of Uni-
versity hall (Mason fall) in five col-
(Continued on Page Six.)
GRADUATE CLUB WILL ELECT
OFFICERS AT MEETING TONIGHT
The first meeting of the Graduate
club will be held at 4:15 o'clock to-
day in room 205 of the north wing of
University hall. This is to be an im-
portant meeting of the club, as a sec-
retary and treasurer must be elected
and also the nominations for gradu-
ate representative to the Student Coun-
cil will be held.
Graduate club dues of one dollar for
the year will be due and payable at
this meeting.

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Turn over
this page
and just
notice the
"Y" ad on
the other
side. Read
it too.

** * * * * * * * * *

p S

S
I,

Freshmen
Complimentary
Get your tickets at New-
berry Hall before Wed-
nesday at 6 P. M.

Opening BanqutofYWC
U U
BA RBOUR G Y MNASIUM
SATURDAY., OCTOBER 14th-6 O'CLOCK.

Upperclass Tickets
50 cents
Get your tickets at tal
in Library before We
nesday at 6 P. M.

U

..
... .

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